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Subject: Games with Closed Economies rss

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Cody Moultrie
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Hi all. I find that I like games with a "closed economy". I'm not sure if this is a universal term, but to me it means a game where there may be some new money or resources that enter play periodically, but where the bulk of the in game economic transactions happen between players. Some examples of this type of game are:

Container: The best example I know of. Most actions require you to buy resources from the other players. New money comes in to the game via the island, but that's it.
Monopoly: Passing go and a couple chance/community chest cards generate money, but that's pretty much it. Most transactions involve paying rent to and from other players. While I don't enjoy the game as much as I used to, it is a good example of this type of closed economy.
Batavia: Maybe not the best example, but the currency used for the initial bids each round is passed among the players depending on who wins the bid. If you win a bid one round, you will have less money to bid in later rounds.

Are there other games that have this type of closed economy?
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Eric Tama
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I think Planet Steam would count under this definition, although it has been a while since I've played it.
 
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Geoffrey Burrell
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Cedar Rapids
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You might want to try Warriors & Traders. That might fit the description of what you are looking for.
 
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Michael Carter
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Eric_Tama wrote:
I think Planet Steam would count under this definition, although it has been a while since I've played it.


I don't think Planet Steam fits since a lot of money comes in through the markets.

I can't think of any that are as closed as Container. Goa does to an extent, but players are able to spend actions to bring in money.
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Chris Grandy
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Wealth of Nations has a lot of player interaction...you produce resources and sell them to other players. I can't remember if there's any outside money or not...haven't played it in a long time.

Wealth of Nations
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Eric Tama
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Ahh yeah. Well same thing can kind of be said with the island's subsidy in Container, but then again in Planet Steam the economy can't crash as hard as in Container. Goa was the other one I was thinking of but didn't say anything because of the action thing.

You finally noticed something I posted Michael! It must be the dumb avatar.
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Justin
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Does Indonesia count? It's an awesome game either way.
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David H
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First thing that came to mind:

Goa

There is an action that brings money into the economy, but most of the money circulates between players.

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Derry Salewski
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Chris Broggi
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Dream Factory is the first one that comes to mind. It is an auction game where the winner pays the losers.
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Shane Larsen
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Brass fits.

In Brass, you start with a set amount. As it grows scarce, it gets more expensive. But players can inject more resources into the game by building factories (coal mines and ironworks), which then fill the empty markets up again.

Great game.
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Jordan Fraser
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Neue Heimat has a completely closed economy.
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David H
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broggi wrote:
Dream Factory is the first one that comes to mind. It is an auction game where the winner pays the losers.


Good call, this one is a completely closed auction/economy. Not quite an "economy" like container, but completely closed.
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David H
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thedacker wrote:
Brass fits.

In Brass, you start with a set amount. As it grows scarce, it gets more expensive. But players can inject more resources into the game by building factories (coal mines and ironworks), which then fill the empty markets up again.

Great game.


Brass is not even remotely closed.

There is a faucet/sink model, but that is not the same thing.

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Tim Thornhill
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Glen More and For Sale fit the description.
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Brook Gentlestream
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Chaosmos is the ultimate closed economy game, although its not economic. Most of the cards are re-useable, but can be dropped off face-down at locations and picked up later (perhaps by another player). So a lot of the game is tracking who is going where, what people might be picking up or dropping off what items, and trying to keep your opponents guessing as to what you are up to.

I might have a cool new weapon, but everytime I use it, I have to reveal it. Eventually, someoene's going to find the defensive card for that weapon, and when I start noicing that someone else has it, I may decide to drop some cards off at a nearby planet and pick some cards up there. Did I get rid of my weapon? Did I get a new one? Should you keep using the defense card (taking up valuable hand-space), or drop it off for something else useful?

Even though everything feels chaotic and cards are moving around and nothing's ever where you left it, it's all driven by player choices as they draw cards and pick them up, lock them on vaults, seal them behind traps, or teleport around.

There's even one alien whose unique power is to remove cards from the game, dropping it from the closed economy forever! Imagine if he did that to the life support system your race needs to survive on one of the toxic planets! Or the defense card to the weapon he's using! Or the key to the magnetic vaults someone's been activating.

Lots of weird wackiness can happen when you have a closed economy, especially a concealed closed economy.
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Rob Steward
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Not precisely what you're asking about, but I suspect you'd definitely like Chicago Express. Everything about the game and its economy is completely player-driven.
 
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James Ludlow
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WyantJM wrote:
Does Indonesia count?

No. The game starts with [player count] X 100 rupiah in the economy. That will grow by 10-20x by the end of the game.

Quote:
It's an awesome game either way.

Yes it is.
 
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David B
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Tim Thornhill wrote:
Glen More and For Sale fit the description.


Uhh...no they don't.
 
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Scott Nelson
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Gamenight was created around sticking with a closed economy. You know maybe I'll revisit this game and make it work better, and add fun to the mix.
 
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Tim Thornhill
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pfctsqr wrote:
Tim Thornhill wrote:
Glen More and For Sale fit the description.


Uhh...no they don't.


It's been a while since I've played For Sale. I was thinking of the bidding mechanic from Boomtown where the winner of the auction pays their bid to the remaining players. Boomtown is not closed either, as money gets introduced throughout the game.

Glen More definitely has a closed money system. Other than a single tile which gives three coins to the player that takes it, no other money is introduced after initial setup.
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Manuel Berger
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The Great Zimbabwe economic system is not completely closed, since thereare many ways to get money from the "bank", but once the money is in play, it will circulate between players (although a small part of it will beremoved from play too)

So, the system is not hermethic, but it rewards the players who manage to control the flow of the money better.

Really recommend this game
 
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Graham Charlton
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Already mentioned but I'll agree that Goa is an excellent example of this. The auctions move money between players most of the time, with occasional moments where money enters or leaves the economy. This has the effect of inflating or deflating the value of the currency, which is fascinating. Using a take 6 money from the bank action is next to worthless when there is tons of money floating about, but if there's very little in the game suddenly it becomes a very powerful move.
 
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Chris
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thedacker wrote:
Brass fits.

In Brass, you start with a set amount. As it grows scarce, it gets more expensive. But players can inject more resources into the game by building factories (coal mines and ironworks), which then fill the empty markets up again.

Great game.
I don't *think* it does. Surely income raises from tile flipping and taking loans mean that money comes into to game over it's course, which is exactly not what they're after? Either way though. Mmmm Brass....
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Virre Linwendil Annergård
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svasongha wrote:
Hi all. I find that I like games with a "closed economy". I'm not sure if this is a universal term, but to me it means a game where there may be some new money or resources that enter play periodically, but where the bulk of the in game economic transactions happen between players. Some examples of this type of game are:

Container: The best example I know of. Most actions require you to buy resources from the other players. New money comes in to the game via the island, but that's it.
Monopoly: Passing go and a couple chance/community chest cards generate money, but that's pretty much it. Most transactions involve paying rent to and from other players. While I don't enjoy the game as much as I used to, it is a good example of this type of closed economy.
Batavia: Maybe not the best example, but the currency used for the initial bids each round is passed among the players depending on who wins the bid. If you win a bid one round, you will have less money to bid in later rounds.

Are there other games that have this type of closed economy?


You should try Industria, this is much more of a closed economy then the games you mentioned. Also Hansa have money rotating between players more.
 
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