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Subject: Six Newbies at War – Part 9 rss

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Gary Goh
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After completing my solo introductory session of the Global War campaign, I came to know four fellow gamers who were interested in playing out this monster with me and my brother-in-law.

This report is part of a longer series of session reports about what transpires during the game. While I write these reports from Japan’s perspective, I try not to give too much away since this game is still in progress and my opponents are regular BGG members who read these forums often.

Players:

Jamie – Russia/Communist China
Boon – Britain
Ian & Jasmine – US/France/Nationalist China

Nigel – European Axis
Gary – Japan


Links:

Part 1: Six Newbies at War – Part 1
Part 2: Six Newbies at War – Part 2
Part 3: Six Newbies at War – Part 3
Part 4: Six Newbies at War – Part 4
Part 5: Six Newbies at War – Part 5
Part 6: Six Newbies at War – Part 6
Part 7: Six Newbies at War – Part 7
Part 8: Six Newbies at War – Part 8
Part 10: Six Newbies at War – Part 10
Part 11: Six Newbies at War – Part 11
Part 12: Six Newbies at War – Part 12
Part 13: Six Newbies at War – Part 13
Part 14: Six Newbies at War – Part 14
Part 15: Six Newbies at War – Part 15
Part 16: Six Newbies at War – Part 16
Part 17: Six Newbies at War – Part 17
Part 18: Six Newbies at War – Part 18
Part 19: Six Newbies at War – Part 19
Part 20: Six Newbies at War – Part 20
Part 21: Six Newbies at War – Part 21 (end)

==================================================================================


As this session was held at the beginning of a long weekend, Ian represented the Allies as the others were not available.


Fall 1941 (Allies):


EUROPEAN THEATER


The U.S. mobilizes for the fifth time in Europe, as USAT reaches 40. It looks like the Allied juggernaut is going for overwhelming air support, as one SBP is mobilized along with five AAF.

Not to be outdone, Russia mobilizes the second half of its peacetime M4. The Soviets can mobilize up to 12 BRPs worth of units this round, after adding the two BRPs that are brought forward from the first half of their M4. One AAF and one 4o5 armour unit are mobilized at a total cost of 11 BRPs, and the remaining mobilization BRP is carried forward to the next Russian mobilization or production activity.

The British opt to take the army and construction oil effects to conserve their dwindling oil reserve, which is now down to two oil counters.

This turn sees action in the Mediterranean front, involving the British TF2 which is based at Haifa in Palestine. Though the TF will draw supply and oil from the South African box and Mosul respectively for this turn, it is in perceptible danger of having its supply line cut off by the Axis in subsequent turns so Ian decides to withdraw the TF to safer ground. Anticipating an Axis interception near Malta, Ian sends the Gibraltar-based British and French TF1s on a patrol mission to a water hex neighbouring Tunis, and which is slightly out of range of the nine German land-based air factors stationed at Messina.

The two Italian submarines at Cagliari intercept the British and French TF1s at their patrol hex, and each TF deploys as a different combat group. As these onboard submarine interceptions occur outside of naval combat, each intercepting sub will 1) select a combat group to attack, 2) roll for an eligible category of ships to target, 3) select its target from the category rolled, and 4) attack its selected target separately:

RULE CALLOUT:
22.93 SUBMARINE TARGETS:
A. AGAINST SINGLE ENEMY COMBAT GROUPS: Whenever submarines attack a naval force, that force deploys into combat groups, following the procedure set out in 22.42 (EXCEPTION: A naval force attacked by submarines outside of naval combat may contain more than six combat groups). Submarine attacks are made against single enemy combat groups, whether the enemy naval units are engaged in naval combat or not. Submarines never attack a multi-TF naval force as a whole.

C. SUBMARINES ATTACK ALONE: Submarines may not attack in conjunction with other naval units.
D. ATTACKS RESOLVED SEPARATELY: After all submarine attacks have been announced, each attack is resolved separately.
E. SELECTING TARGETS: Each attacking submarine targets a category of defending naval units: fast carriers; capital ships (non-carrier named ships); or light ships.
- If there is a single category of defending ships, that category is attacked.
- If there are two categories of defending ships, the target category is determined by rolling one die: 1-3: the higher category (fast carriers or capital ships); 4-6: the lower category (capital ships or light ships).
- If there are three categories of defending ships, the target category is determined by rolling one die: 1-2: fast carriers; 3-4: capital ships; 5-6: light ships.
- Within each category, the attacker chooses his specific target; light ships are attacked as a group.



Nigel rolls for the first Italian sub and gets light ships as the target category. However, the following combat roll doesn’t go well and the sub fails to score a hit after a -2 modifier is applied to the roll. The second Italian sub also targets the light ship category, but has better luck and manages to sink a CA. Both subs return to Cagliari and are inverted for the rest of the Allied turn.

The British TF2 now changes base towards Gibraltar by sailing along the Middle Eastern coastal hexes, though the TF is intercepted in a water hex two hexes away from Malta by German AAF and both Italian TFs*:

*We had wrongly assumed that the naval base change activity required the TF to touch on a friendly port within 20 hexes from the port of origin, when in fact there is no such requirement as stated in 21.3613:

RULE CALLOUT:
21.361 RANGE RESTRICTIONS: The range of naval activities is restricted as follows (EXCEPTION: Range restrictions do not apply to countries in theaters in which they are not at war). These limits apply to both fleets and carriers. The notional hexes off the western edge of the Atlantic mapboard and the eastern edge of the Pacific mapboard are considered to be Western Allied ports for purposes of rules 21.3611-3615.
21.3611 INTERCEPTIONS, COUNTER-INTERCEPTIONS: The maximum range for naval interceptions and counter-interceptions is 40 (European) or 20 (Pacific) hexes (22.22).
21.3612 SEA SUPPLY, NRs, SEA ESCORT: There is no range limit for sea supply (30.33), NRs and sea escort (28.5), although such activities must touch a port (21.36C) at least once every 20 (Europe) or 10 (Pacific) hexes. (EXCEPTIONS: See 21.3615 and 21.3616 for exceptions in the Pacific). Islands without port access (21.37) from which units are being NRed are considered to contain ports for the purpose of meeting the range requirement for that sea escort only.
21.3613 BASE CHANGES, NAVAL DISPLACEMENT: Base changes may not exceed 40 (Europe) or 20 (Pacific) hexes. Displaced naval units may not move more than 40 ( Europe) or 20 (Pacific) hexes. (EXCEPTION: See 21.3616 for exceptions in the Pacific).
21.3614 OFFENSIVE NAVAL MISSIONS: Offensive naval missions may not exceed 40 (Europe) or 20 (Pacific) hexes, and must touch a port (21.36C) at least once every 20 (Europe) or 10 (Pacific) hexes. (EXCEPTIONS: See 21.3615 and 21.3616 for exceptions in the Pacific). In addition, the following exceptions apply specifically to seaborne invasions:
- The range of a commando unit using its special capability to invade a port is restricted to 10 ( Europe) or 5 (Pacific) hexes.
- Dutch Harbor may not be used as a base for seaborne invasions.
- Japan may only invade Dutch Harbor from Japan, and only if it first controls and fully supplies another Aleutian island. The invasion must pass through the required island en route to Dutch Harbor.



Because of this rule misinterpretation, the British TF2 has been unnecessarily exposed to early interception by the Italian TFs at Genoa and Trieste. To keep the game moving though, the naval combat as played out and described below will remain especially since the Axis came out of the battle in a far worse state.

While the patrolling British and French TF1s attempt to counter-intercept in the interception hex, their patrol hex is eight hexes away from the latter. This means that the two Allied TFs can only participate in the naval combat after two combat rounds have taken place between the Italian TFs and the British TF2 as per 22.163:

RULE CALLOUT:
22.163 OFFENSIVE PATROL SUPPORT FOR FRIENDLY NAVAL ACTIVITIES: Naval units on offensive patrols, including submarines, do not roll dice to counter-intercept. Instead:
A. Patrolling naval forces may only counter-intercept in the hex in which the intercepting enemy naval forces intercepted the original naval activity.
B. If the interception hex is within three hexes of its patrol hex, the patrolling naval force moves to the interception hex and participates in the first round of naval combat.
C. If the patrol hex is more than three hexes from the interception hex, the patrolling force does not participate in the first round of naval combat; its participation is deferred by one round for every additional four (European) or two (Pacific) hexes it is from the interception hex. In Europe: patrol hex within 3 hexes: round one; 4-7 hexes: round two; 8-11 hexes: round three, and so on; in the Pacific: patrol hex within 3 hexes: round one; 4-5 hexes: round two; 7-8 hexes: round three, and so on.



Nigel activates his German land-based air factors at Messina as air support in the interception hex, where each activated German AAF is broken down into one attack AAS, one cover AAS and one search AAS. Since Germany’s Air Nationality level of two limits the capacity of any Axis air strike to a maximum of eight air (attack AAS) squadrons, Nigel will only use eight of the nine German air factors at Messina:

RULE CALLOUT:
23.7 ATTACKS ON ENEMY NAVAL UNITS AT SEA:

23.73 SIZE OF AIR STRIKES: The number of air squadrons that may attack a defending combat group in a single air strike, whether from land bases, carriers or both, is limited by the Air Nationality DRM of the attacking air squadrons (EXCEP­TION: Kamikazes – 17.47D), as follows:
- Air Nationality DRM of one or less: up to four air squadrons.
- Air Nationality DRM of two: up to eight air squadrons.
- Air Nationality DRM of three or more: up to 12 air squadrons.
This limit applies separately to forces containing air squadrons with different Air Nationality DRMs:
- The first four air squadrons conducting an air strike may have any Air Nationality DRM;
- The next four air squadrons must have an Air Nationality DRM of at least two;
- The final four air squadrons must have an Air Nationality DRM of at least three.



While deploying the TFs into combat groups, we realize that the British TF2 exceeded the 25 naval factor limit so it is decided that the excess naval factors will be split off into a different TF. This means that Ian will deploy the intercepted British TF2 into two combat groups (instead of one, as it ought to be the case):

RULE CALLOUT:
Size of TFs:
20.16 TFs

20.162 A TF marker, if available, may be placed on the board to represent a naval force, subject to the following:
A. A TF must consist of no fewer than 10 naval factors and no more than 25 naval factors (EXCEPTION: Japan’s Pearl Harbor strike force - 51.12).


Grouping of TFs during naval combat:
22.42 COMBAT GROUPS:
22.421 FORMATION: Naval forces seeking to engage in naval combat secretly deploy into combat groups as follows:
A. Prior to the first round of naval combat:
- Each TF unencumbered by cargo forms a separate combat group. Unencumbered TFs may not be broken down and may not combine with other unencumbered TFs to form combat groups.



The Axis are hard-pressed to end the naval combat before the counter-intercepting Allied naval forces arrive, so Nigel deploys his Italian TFs into CG1 and CG2. This allows him to maximize the availability of his TFs to engage in naval combat if either of the British combat groups is found through search rolls. On the Allied side, Ian deploys his intercepted naval forces into CG1 and CG2 as well.

Again, naval combat is conducted in the following sequence:

RULE CALLOUT:
22.4 NAVAL COMBAT SEGMENTS:
22.41 NAVAL COMBAT SEGMENTS: Each naval combat round is divided into the following segments, not all of which will necessarily occur in each naval battle:
A. FORMATION OF COMBAT GROUPS…

> This segment is completed for the first round of naval combat, as described above.

B. ATTACKS AGAINST ENEMY AIR BASES…:
> Ian opts not to counterair the German AAS and Italian AAF with his carrier-based NAS. As an air combat result may have resulted in a number of German AAS being shot down or aborting, this means that Nigel can use all of his AAS in this round of naval combat.

C. ALLOCATION OF CARRIER-BASED AIR UNITS…:
> Ian allocates any carrier-based NAS in the Allied CGs for CAP and air strike missions.

D. ALLOCATION OF LAND-BASED AIR UNITS TO AIR COVER…:
> The eight German cover AAS are assigned individually to the Italian CGs to provide air cover against any Allied air strikes.

E. SEARCH…:
> Nigel and Ian roll for search, with the number of dice determined in accordance with the search table in 22.45 which is replicated below. To find an opposing combat group, each of them has to roll at least one “1” or “2”, with reference to the opposing side’s combat group numbers. As Nigel is able to assign a maximum of three search AAS to aid in his search rolls, he rolls a total of four dice (i.e. three for land-based squadron search, and one for CG1 which is considered a friendly active combat group and contains at least ten undamaged naval factors) while Ian rolls only one die (likewise for his CG1)^:

Search Table – 22.45:
+1, (for) each land-based air squadron assigned to search (22.451A). (Maximum: +3);
+/-1, codebreaking advantage (48.51A, 48.62);
+1, (for) each previous round of naval combat. (No maximum);
+1, (for) each friendly active combat group consisting of at least ten undamaged naval factors (22.451D). (Maximum: +6);
+1, (for) each friendly distant combat group containing at least one fully operational fast carrier (22.451D). (Maximum: +5);


^Since this is the first round of combat, the CG1s on each side are considered to be active combat groups and the CG2s are considered to be distant combat groups.

22.425 STATUS: At any given point in a naval battle, each combat group has one of the following statuses:
A. ACTIVE: If a combat group’s number is equal to or less than the number of the current combat round, that combat group is “active”.
B. DISTANT: If a combat group’s number is greater than the number of the current combat round, that combat group is “distant”.


F. REVEALING COMBAT GROUPS:… :
Only the distant British CG2 is found during the search roll, and is engaged by the Italian CG2*.

*Again, another rule was misinterpreted here. While we understood that a search result allows for fleet combat against a distant combat group, we did not realize that only active unpaired combat groups could be used to engage in fleet combat against the enemy’s found distant combat group as per 22.452C. Since this was only the first combat round and both sides had a CG1 which automatically pair off, the Italians would not have an available active unpaired combat group to initiate fleet combat against the British CG2 (since the Italian CG2 was itself a distant combat group and would not be eligible) and would therefore not be able to achieve the results during the following fleet combat between the two CG2s.

RULE CALLOUT:
22.452C. MULTIPLE SEARCH RESULTS: If more than one search result against the same combat group is achieved, that enemy combat group may be attacked more than once:

- Fleet Combat: For each search result against a distant enemy combat group, one active unpaired combat group may initiate fleet combat against that combat group (22.52). No search results are required for fleet combat between active combat groups and such fleet combat does not count against the limit on the number of air strikes.
...



G. AIR STRIKES AND ATTACKS…:
Air strikes can only be made against combat groups which are found during the search rolls. Though the British CG2 was found, Nigel had opted to initiate fleet combat against the CG so no air strikes are made this turn.

On hindsight though, the fact that we had wrongly conducted naval combat for the CG2s because of the search roll did not negate the alternative option of an AAS air strike against the found British CG2. This means that the British CAs would nevertheless go down as described in the following paragraphs, though the primary difference would be the form of Axis losses, i.e. German AAF in place of Italian light ships.

H. FLEET COMBAT…:
Since this is the first round of naval combat, the CG1s will engage in fleet combat with their counterparts. As Nigel and Ian rank their capital ships in descending order in terms of size & speed and subsequently pair off each ship with an opposing capital ship, Ian assigns an unpaired BB3 to support another BB3 in naval combat against the Italian BB3 A. Doria. All ships take single hits during combat, except for the unpaired BB3 and the A.Doria which is damaged after taking two hits from the two British BB3s’ combined fire. The next sub-segment of fleet combat for the CG1s involves the light ships pairing off as a single group, pitting twelve Axis light naval factors against ten from the Allied side. Though the Axis has a numerical factor advantage, an unskilled Axis die roll and negative Naval Nationality DRM modifier result in the Italians taking a higher number of naval factor losses.

As mentioned, the CG2s (illegally) pair off with only six cruiser factors forming the British CG2. The Italians have seven BB factors which fire first at the light ships and damage one British CA. The Italian light ships finish off the other two undamaged British CAs, though the British light ships heroically destroy one Italian CA before they go down.

I. SUBMARINE ATTACKS…
No submarines are involved in this interception, so we skip this step.

With the conclusion of naval combat round one, the British and French TF1s move four hexes closer towards the interception hex.

Round 2 sees the Axis successfully finding the British CG1 during the search segment, while the Allies do not enjoy similar success. Each successful search result allows for an air strike or (additional) fleet combat to be initiated against the found combat group. However, Nigel is not allowed to initiate a surprise air strike on the British CG1 though none of the Italian CGs is found by the Allies, since surprise air strikes can only be carried out by carrier-based NAS which the Italians do not have. Instead, he initiates a non-surprise air strike with the eight German attack AAS on the British CG1:

RULE CALLOUT:
23.741 SURPRISE AIR STRIKES:
23.7411 ONLY ONE SURPRISE AIR STRIKE PER COMBAT ROUND: Only one surprise air strike may be made in each combat round:
A. Surprise air strikes may only be made by carrier-based air units. Carrier-based air units may not combine with land-based air units to make a surprise air strike.
B. A surprise air strike may only be made by the side that found at least one opposing combat group, and only if none of its combat groups were found.



As the two British NAS flying CAP engage the aerial attackers, two of the eight attack AAS are forced to engage the defending units as per 23.415B:

RULE CALLOUT:
23.415B. ATTACKER’S PARTICIPATION MANDATORY:
- If defending air units flying air cover or combat air patrol over an attacked naval force or combat group elect to engage attacking air units, air combat is resolved between the defending air squadrons and an equal number of attacking air squadrons.
- If there are fewer attacking air squadrons than covering air squadrons, all the attacking air squadrons must engage in air combat with the defending air units.
- If there are more attacking air squadrons than covering air squadrons, the attacker decides which of his air squadrons will engage in air combat with the defending air units. The attacker’s Air Nationality DRM for the air combat is that of the air squadrons actually engaging the defending air squadrons. The attacker may not commit more air squadrons to air combat than the defender.



Each side takes a 1/1 result after modifiers. The British CG’s air defence roll takes out one more German AAS and aborts another to leave only four AAS available for the air strike proper. Nigel concentrates all of the AAS on the fast BC3 Renown and successfully sinks it. The following fleet combat between the capital ships of the two CG1s ends with an Italian BB4, three Italian BB3s, and two British BB3s being damaged. Light ship fleet combat ends on even ground, with both sides taking a similar number of naval factor losses.

In view of the fact that only two capital ships in the Italian CG2 are able to engage in further fleet combat and the approaching British and French TF1s which will join the naval combat in the next round, Nigel aborts his interception attempt and withdraws the remnants of his TFs to the Italian shipyards at Genoa and Trieste for much-needed repair work. This allows the British TF2 to succeed with its base change to Algiers, though at a price of two damaged BB3s (Ramilies and Royal Sovereign) and ten light ship factors lost. The Italians fare far worse though, as four of its battleships are now in need of repair. The damaged British BB3s are subsequently NRed to Glasgow during the Allied redeployment phase for repairs, while the remaining naval factors in the British and French TF1s are uninverted using oil.

On the Eastern Front, the Russians are now able to DOW the Germans at a cost of 35 BRPs since RGT has reached 50. During the turn though, we find out that six of the starting Russian DDs have not been deployed on the map. Since this will be a game-changer if the DDs deploy in the Black Sea (and are hence available for an unexpected seaborne invasion into Rumania from the port of Sevastopol), the decision is to delay a Russian DOW to give the Germans an additional turn to adjust their defence of the Balkans to take this “new” naval force into account.

During the unit construction phase, Russia produces an IC and sites it at the city of Chelyabinsk which borders the Urals box. Four 3x3 infantry units are added to Russia’s force pool from its M3 two turns before, built out and deployed along the Nazi-Soviet front.

On the Western Allied side, Britain launches the BB4 Duke of York with one Western Allied transport and the two newly-produced ASW, builds two NAS, one 1x2 Australian and one 1x3 South African infantry, and one British and South African 3x4 mechanized infantry unit each. The U.S. Atlantic shipyard advances the BB4 Washington, and builds a CVE which will be launched during the next Allied turn. The 3x4 mechanized infantry unit and five AAF which are added to the U.S. force pool are built out too, and are deployed in the U.S. Atlantic box.

Supported now by an ASW fleet of six factors, 13 transports are NRed to the U.S. Atlantic SW box from Glasgow. Three Indian infantry factors NR from the India box to Basra with the use of one Indian Ocean transport in an attempt to challenge the Axis advance in the Middle East.


PACIFIC THEATER


Japan suffers no losses from Communist China’s attrition combat roll. Nationalist China attrits too, though it only manages to inflict a loss of only one Japanese unit counter. This is great news, since much-needed infantry factors will be added into the force pool during the winter from the Summer 1941 M3 and the minor loss will allow Japan to allocate more of its remaining BRPs to build out and deploy these new forces.

RULE CALLOUT:
36.35 TIMING OF FORCE POOL INCREASES: Force pool increases from mobilization are subject to the following delays:
A. SHIPBUILDING: None.
B. AIR: Four turns.
C. INFANTRY: Two turns.
D. MECHANIZED INFANTRY: Four turns.
E. ARMOR: Six turns.
F. TRANSPORTS: None.



The U.S. receives force pool additions from its Fall 1940 M1 in the form of five AAF and five NAS. The AAF are built out, though only four NAS can be built in accordance with the U.S.’ current Naval Air Training rate:

RULE CALLOUT:
27.6 NAVAL AIR CONSTRUCTION:
27.61 NAVAL AIR TRAINING RATES: The number of factors of naval air which may be built each turn is limited for all major powers as follows: the U.S.: 4; Japan: 3; Britain: 2; Germany: 1; Italy: 1. These limits apply to both the construction of new force pool additions and the rebuilding of naval air units which have been eliminated. American construction of CVEs is limited by, but not counted against, naval air training rates (17.353B). Naval air training rates may be increased by the investment of RPs in production (42.23D). France, Russia and China may never build naval air units.



Mirroring its Atlantic shipbuilding strategy, the U.S. Pacific shipyard advances the BB4 North Carolina and builds two CVEs which will be launched during the next turn.

Nationalist China empties its non-partisan force pool of one 1x2 infantry and three replacements during the unit construction phase. In response to Japanese landings in Haiphong, these reinforcements are deployed along the border between mainland China and French Indochina to defend the road to the Chinese city of Kunming^:

^The significance of Western Allied/Chinese control of Kunming lies in the fact that Nationalist China can receive BRP grants from the U.S., and where all BRP grants have to go through Kunming. As long as the Western Allies or Chinese keep a path open through which BRP grants can flow to Kunming, Nationalist China will have sufficient resources to replace any losses that are sustained from Japanese attrition attacks. This will weaken Japan’s ability to exert pressure on Nationalist China’s resistance level.

RULE CALLOUT:
40.8 BRP GRANTS TO CHINA:
40.81 Before the outbreak of war between Japan and the U.S., the U.S. may grant BRPs to China only as permitted by the USJT level. After the outbreak of war between Japan and the U.S., American BRP grants to China are limited only by the capacity of the BRP routes to China.
40.82 MECHANICS: American BRP grants to China are made by sending the granted BRPs along one of the following routes. All land hexes along the route must be under Allied control and free of Japanese ZoCs.
A. From the Pacific U.S. box through the Pacific, then on the Pacific mapboard to:
- a port in China, then to Chungking or Kunming;
- a port in French Indochina, then to Kunming;
- a port in Burma or India, then to Kunming via the Burma Road (40.84) or over the Hump (40.85).

40.83 CHINESE PORTS AND FRENCH INDOCHINA: Up to ten BRPs may be granted to China via a Chinese port or French Indochina each turn.
40.831 RESTRICTIONS:
A. BRP grants may be made through a Chinese port only if the Chinese or Western Allies have recaptured such a port from Japan.
B. BRP grants may be made through French Indochina only if the Western Allies control Haiphong and can trace a supply line from Haiphong to Kunming without passing through Burma.

40.84 THE BURMA ROAD: Up to ten BRPs may be granted to China via the Burma Road each turn.
40.841 RESTRICTIONS: The Burma Road is closed if there is no supply line from the India box to Mandalay, then from Mandalay to Kunming.

40.85 THE HUMP: Up to five BRPs may be granted to China over the Himalayas each turn.
40.851 MECHANICS: One uninverted Western Allied air transport factor must be used to fly BRPs to China. The air transport must fly from a Western Allied air base in India or Burma over the Himalayas to Kunming. Both must be operational air bases. The air route of the grant may be traced over hexes adjacent to Japanese units, but not over hexes under Japanese control, and may not be more than three hexes in length.



Since Japan controls all waterways to Chinese ports (and will effectively achieve the same with respect to French Indochina ports upon conquest of the Philippines and Dutch East Indies, since the Western Allies will not be able to meet the offensive operation naval range restrictions for BRP grants in the absence of friendly ports within range), the first two paths described in 40.83 are closed. Taking over Rangoon and Mandalay city in Burma will close off the option stated in 40.84, while stationing AAF in range of Kunming to intercept air transport missions over the Himalayas will be the final nail in the coffin for BRP grants to China.

Meanwhile, somewhere in the Pacific, Kido Butai sails not-so-secretly…


Ending state of events:


European theater (continental Europe, Western Front)



European theater (continental Europe, Eastern Front)



European theater (Mediterranean and North Africa - West)



European theater (Mediterranean and North Africa - East)



Pacific theater (mainland China)



Pacific theater (Asia)



Pacific theater (South-East Asia)



Pacific theater (Australia)

==================================================================================

Links:

Part 1: Six Newbies at War – Part 1
Part 2: Six Newbies at War – Part 2
Part 3: Six Newbies at War – Part 3
Part 4: Six Newbies at War – Part 4
Part 5: Six Newbies at War – Part 5
Part 6: Six Newbies at War – Part 6
Part 7: Six Newbies at War – Part 7
Part 8: Six Newbies at War – Part 8
Part 10: Six Newbies at War – Part 10
Part 11: Six Newbies at War – Part 11
Part 12: Six Newbies at War – Part 12
Part 13: Six Newbies at War – Part 13
Part 14: Six Newbies at War – Part 14
Part 15: Six Newbies at War – Part 15
Part 16: Six Newbies at War – Part 16
Part 17: Six Newbies at War – Part 17
Part 18: Six Newbies at War – Part 18
Part 19: Six Newbies at War – Part 19
Part 20: Six Newbies at War – Part 20
Part 21: Six Newbies at War – Part 21 (end)
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Eric Krug
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The Flying Tigers are often deployed forward along the Chinese coast just before Pearl Harbor.

This forces Japan to either counterair them (which takes 2 AAF away from elsewhere) or else allows an air attack on a Japanese supply route, which might do some damage to escorting naval units.

Japan will need to be careful to avoid having unescorted supply if the FT are able to attack, as that allows a supply line to be cut.

It's a minor annoyance but it's about as much offensive action as the Allies can achieve right after Pearl Harbor.
 
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Ian Yeo
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That idea did come to mind of forward deploying the Tigers. And 2 Air away for the japs sounds like a very good idea. However, there is a debate of being conservative or otherwise.

There were already some miscalculations on the part of the allies with regard to fleets and the atlantic war.
 
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Gary Goh
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Added link to part 10
 
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Gary Goh
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Added links to parts 11, 12 and 13
 
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Gary Goh
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Added link to part 14
 
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