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Subject: Game Box Manufacturers rss

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D24 Wrestling
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Can anyone recommend some game box manufacturers? Also, how critical do you think a game box is in terms of a primarily "mail order based game,"---in other words, I don't sell it to retail stores yet.

Thanks!
 
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Richard Urich
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You usually do not separately source game boxes since it would not be cost-effective. Whoever is making your board, cards, or whatever can probably provide folded cardboard as well.

A box is actually really important to me. If a game has a bad box, or I've had to move it because the game has outgrown the box (expansions, sleeves, or whatever), I wind up rarely playing the game since it is not as readily recognizable. Less played means less valuable to me, less memorable, and less likely others will play and buy their own copy.
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Paul DeStefano
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Be prepared for your box to be the most expensive component of your game.
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Andrew Lieffring
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Geosphere wrote:
Be prepared for your box to be the most expensive component of your game.


To be fair, it will be by definition the largest.
 
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Bryan Thunkd
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IncompleteUserNa wrote:
Geosphere wrote:
Be prepared for your box to be the most expensive component of your game.


To be fair, it will be by definition the largest.
Really? What about a quad-fold board?
 
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D24 Wrestling
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I have some glossy black boxes that will definitely fit the game.
However, there is nothing on them. If I put a sticker on the box (cover art/etc) would that look too tacky?

My game hasn't been out long, and I'm wondering if I wait a while to do the box. However, it seems really important to some, as some fellow posters have already stated.

Any links? It doesn't have to be a super thick box etc.

Thanks
 
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Sean Haugh
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bluedevler wrote:
I have some glossy black boxes that will definitely fit the game.
However, there is nothing on them. If I put a sticker on the box (cover art/etc) would that look too tacky?

My game hasn't been out long, and I'm wondering if I wait a while to do the box. However, it seems really important to some, as some fellow posters have already stated.

Any links? It doesn't have to be a super thick box etc.

Thanks


I wouldn't be averse to a sticker for cover art on a regular box if I knew that's what it took to get that game off the ground, but make sure there is some identification on the sides as well.
 
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D24 Wrestling
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Chiselphane wrote:
bluedevler wrote:
I have some glossy black boxes that will definitely fit the game.
However, there is nothing on them. If I put a sticker on the box (cover art/etc) would that look too tacky?

My game hasn't been out long, and I'm wondering if I wait a while to do the box. However, it seems really important to some, as some fellow posters have already stated.

Any links? It doesn't have to be a super thick box etc.

Thanks


I wouldn't be averse to a sticker for cover art on a regular box if I knew that's what it took to get that game off the ground, but make sure there is some identification on the sides as well.


All four sides, or just two?
 
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rob stencel

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There was a good resource on how to make your own box here, http://boardgamegeek.com/thread/274094/make-your-own-box-and..., but the links don't seem to work anymore. The write up is still ok. Not sure how many boxes your talking about, but wrapping a box isn't that difficult if have a way of printing large enough sheet to cover it, aren't are not doing a ton of them.
 
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Sean Haugh
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bluedevler wrote:

All four sides, or just two?


All four. You never know which direction people are going to store the box in
 
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Richard Urich
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All four sides would obviously look more professional. Packaging for a product is one of the cheapest forms of advertising, and one of the best targeted to boot. While it's tempting to say "it's just a box", you're just shooting yourself in the foot with bad packaging.

And keep in mind your box is conveying a lot of implied value for a product. This is why a glass jar of cookies is far more expensive than the same cookies in a plastic container. So a more expensive box may very well pay for itself and then some by permitting a higher price point.
 
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Nick Hayes
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Thunkd wrote:
IncompleteUserNa wrote:
Geosphere wrote:
Be prepared for your box to be the most expensive component of your game.


To be fair, it will be by definition the largest.
Really? What about a quad-fold board?

A quad-fold board will always be more expensive than a lid and base box.

While a good box is a large part of a game's cost, it is not always the most expensive part.
 
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Andy Van Zandt
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A chipboard box is FREQUENTLY the most expensive component, if there isn't a quad fold board in the box then the box is PROBABLY the most expensive component (barring, say, a bunch of miniatures or something; or at the other end of the spectrum, if your box is just a tuckbox), and it's something that people who are new to the industry often don't know and will be surprised by, so it's good to tell them.

Or, another way to look at it- over half of all games won't have a quad-fold board. Almost every game will have a box. Advice about the box is more universally applicable.
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Nick Hayes
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truekid wrote:
A chipboard box is FREQUENTLY the most expensive component, if there isn't a quad fold board in the box then the box is PROBABLY the most expensive component (barring, say, a bunch of miniatures or something; or at the other end of the spectrum, if your box is just a tuckbox), and it's something that people who are new to the industry often don't know and will be surprised by, so it's good to tell them.

Or, another way to look at it- over half of all games won't have a quad-fold board. Almost every game will have a box. Advice about the box is more universally applicable.

Those are good points. I edited my reply above to sound less like a dick.
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monchi
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Black Canyon wrote:
Thunkd wrote:
IncompleteUserNa wrote:
Geosphere wrote:
Be prepared for your box to be the most expensive component of your game.


To be fair, it will be by definition the largest.
Really? What about a quad-fold board?

A quad-fold board will always be more expensive than a lid and base box.

While a good box is a large part of a game's cost, it is not always the most expensive part.


I would be curious as to where you have come up with the knowledge to make this assumption? A quad board will be no where near the cost of a game box. I was a bookbinder for almost 15 years and I can assure you that hands down the box is the most time consuming and expensive part. Any way you decided to look at it the box will always cost more than the board, be it creating new custom dies or using existing dies or making it all by hand.

What most people don't get is that to make a standard telescoping box you require 4 dies. 2 for cutting the board and 2 for cutting the printed wraps. Even if you are using a manufacture that already has all the dies for the box and board, you have 4 different die cutting setups and 2 setups for wrapping the box compared to 1 die setup and 1 setup for wrapping the board.

The reality is that unless you are doing a production run of 1000 boxes they will be made by hand which will cost way more. With boards you can blow these out fast regardless of if you use a machine or do them by hand as you don't need a special box making machine to run them.

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monchi
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bluedevler wrote:
Can anyone recommend some game box manufacturers? Also, how critical do you think a game box is in terms of a primarily "mail order based game,"---in other words, I don't sell it to retail stores yet.

Thanks!


How many boxes would you be wanting to have made? The reason I ask is that the machines that actually make proper boxes pretty much all require you to do a min run of 1000 boxes as this is the quantity required in order to make it cost effective to set the machine up and run it. If you are looking for small runs I think you are going to be shocked at how expensive it can be to make a box. That said there are a few ways to make professional looking boxes for cheaper. I worked on a project with a designer that was doing a small run of games. In order to get the prices to a place that made any sense at all we needed to print 500 copies worth of his game and then only produced 250 in the first production run. I designed a foldable telescoping box for him that allowed us to maximize the max sheet size of paper for the box and reduce the number of dies needed from 4 to 2. The printed wraps were glued to a white card stock and then this laminated sheet was then die cut. This allows us to ship the boxes to him flat rather than constructed. So rather than shipping skids of boxes we could send one skid with 250 boxes flat packed on it. It made it easier for him to store and he was able to make boxes as he needed. They looked pro as he had full printing over the entire box. I could dig out the cost on this if you are interested as I think I also quoted him on making conventional game boxes too.

If you want send me a GM as I would be happy to help you in any way I can.
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Nick Hayes
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monchichi wrote:
Black Canyon wrote:
Thunkd wrote:
IncompleteUserNa wrote:
Geosphere wrote:
Be prepared for your box to be the most expensive component of your game.


To be fair, it will be by definition the largest.
Really? What about a quad-fold board?

A quad-fold board will always be more expensive than a lid and base box.

While a good box is a large part of a game's cost, it is not always the most expensive part.


I would be curious as to where you have come up with the knowledge to make this assumption? A quad board will be no where near the cost of a game box. I was a bookbinder for almost 15 years and I can assure you that hands down the box is the most time consuming and expensive part. Any way you decided to look at it the box will always cost more than the board, be it creating new custom dies or using existing dies or making it all by hand.

What most people don't get is that to make a standard telescoping box you require 4 dies. 2 for cutting the board and 2 for cutting the printed wraps. Even if you are using a manufacture that already has all the dies for the box and board, you have 4 different die cutting setups and 2 setups for wrapping the box compared to 1 die setup and 1 setup for wrapping the board.

The reality is that unless you are doing a production run of 1000 boxes they will be made by hand which will cost way more. With boards you can blow these out fast regardless of if you use a machine or do them by hand as you don't need a special box making machine to run them.

Yes, you're right on these points. I hadn't considered small print runs.

I work in board games for the mass market. Our print runs are usually around 100k to 350k copies of each game and everything is fully automated and produced overseas. So when the manufacturer sends us a breakdown on the cost of goods, quad-fold boards are always more expensive than setup boxes. Labor certainly is minimal for the boxes because they are automated, so I think a lot of the cost comes from the paper spec. Game boards use a much thicker chipboard, a printed sheet, and a high-quality textured wrap while the boxes use a thinner chipboard and a very thin printed wrap.

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