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Joshua Van Horsen
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In-between play testing my other game idea Planet Heist and the usual real-life stuff, I've started thinking about the idea of a Cooperative Roleplaying Card Game that offers Campaign style game play. I wanted to create a game that offered a lot of options and different ways to play, while eliminating all the dice rolling associated with most roleplaying boardgames that I've seen.

This is still very much a Work-in-progress, but I wanted to share it and see if anyone had any initial thoughts. Ultimately I will probably need to pare this down a bit. I think I'll be nearing 1,000 cards in it's current iteration.


UNFORTUNATE MONSTERS

1-4 Players

Game sessions take place in 24 hour Adventures (tracked using the Moon Tracker board), where Players work together to take down the evil monster.

A game session is broken up into three distinct play areas:

1. The Town
2. The Forest
3. The Monster’s Lair


PHASE 1 :: The Town

Players have a choice of actions to make on each turn, but may only do one of the following:

Purchase / Sell equipment from Merchants.
Players start with a pre-determined amount of gold which can be spent on items, weapons and spells at the town Merchants. In a campaign, at the begin of each Adventure, Players may sell the loot they acquired in the previous play session.

Hire / Level Up Adventurers in the Tavern
Players may hire and/or level up Adventurers in the town Tavern. While available Adventurers are usually young and inexperienced, overtime these Adventurers will become strong and powerful. Players may trade in already owned Adventurer cards along with some experience points to level up their characters, gaining new skills and abilities.

Ransack a Home
The monster hunting business can be expensive, so Players may choose to ransack local homes in search of valuables to use or sale. While Ransack cards are free to draw on the Player’s turn, be warned; if the local authorities stop you with stolen goods, you may find yourself even poor than you were before.

Make a Purchase from the Black Market
The Black Market is a shady place, full of unsavory characters. Unfortunately, these questionable characters often hold some of the more exotic goods. Make purchases at your own risk. Black Market items can not be sold in town, but may be used, traded or removed from the game through other means (eg. potion creation, etc.).

Enter the Forest
Once a Player enters the Forest they are unable to return to town this adventure. They may ask other Players still in town to purchase items for them, but they may not retrieve those items until that Player has also entered the Forest and/or Lair.

Each player takes turns completing one of the above actions. After each player has completed a turn in a round, the Hour token is advanced one spot. Players may continue to outfit their Adventurers for as long as they want, but should be warned that the monsters attacks will only become more frequent the longer they delay.


PHASE 2 :: The Forest

Once a Player decides to Enter the Forest, the Player is allowed to choose one item to equip on their inventory card. These items remain available through the Players turns until it is either expended, or destroyed. The effects of this item are ongoing, and may be utilized per the cards text during their turn. Players may equip an item in this slot that provides them additional storage (eg. backpack, thief’s pouch, potion bottle, quiver, etc.). These items will provide information on what types of items may be stored in them. For instance, the thief’s pouch may only hold small items, whereas the quiver may hold only arrows, or the potion bottle may only hold herbs or liquids. All other items will still be available to the player, but may only be played from their hand.

Any remaining gold coins the Player may have are set to the side. During a campaign, this is yours to keep. These coins will be available to you at the beginning of next game session.

The Player then shuffles their remaining cards, drawing the top 5 cards to form their starting hand. The remaining deck is set to the side and will act as their draw pile.

For each Player in the game, the Players deal a travel card into the center of the table plus one extra, and place the lair card on top (eg. 4 player game, deal 5 travel cards and the lair card). Shuffle these cards and place on the table face down. The Player that first entered the Forest receives the first player token. The Player then draws the top travel card and resolves it. Players continue to draw from the travel cards and resolving the text until a player draws the Lair card. Once the lair card is drawn, move the hour token forward one spot. Phase 2 now ends and players advance to Phase 3.

If a creature is drawn in the Travel phase. The player that drew the card is attacked first. If the player is unable (or unwilling) to play a card to block the damage, the player takes direct damage to their Life Pool and may not attack this turn. The next player in turn may attempt to block and attack the creature. Damage done to the creature is tracked with damage tokens on the creatures card. The creature will continue to attack each player until it is killed. The Player that killed the creature may draw from the Travel Loot deck.

PHASE 2 GAMEPLAY EXAMPLE:

Player 1 flips the first Travel card, revealing a non-event. It is now Player 2’s turn. Player 2 flips the second Travel card, revealing the "Stolen Goods" card. Player 1 and Player 3 destroy a total of three ransack cards from their hands. Player 3’s turn now. Player 3 flips the third card, revealing the "Spider Nest" card. Player 3 is immediately attacked by two Giant Spiders for 2 damage total. Player 3 plays a Warrior card from their hand, blocking both points of damage. Because Player 3 also has a shield equipped, his Warriors Bash skill is engaged. Player 3’s Warrior Bashes back at the Spider for 1d2. To determine the damage, Player 3 rolls a 1d6. The roll produces a 3, which means the first spider is stunned (Roll of 1-3= Stun, Roll of 4-6=1 Damage). Player 3 then uses his Warriors attack to do 3 damage to the non-stunned spider, killing it. Per directions on the “Spider Nest” card, Player 3 collects a 500 Experience Point token. Turn proceeds to Player 4. Player 4 may attack the spider that is still in play if able. Because the spider is stunned, it does not have an attack round. Player 4 plays his level 1 cleric. Since Player 4 has no special weapons or spells equipped, the cleric delivers a base damage of 2. Still enough to easily kill the stunned spider. Player Four collects a 500 Experience Points token as directed by the “Spider Nest” card. It is back to Player 1’s turn. Since the “Spider Nest” card has now been resolved, Player 1 may reveal the next card. Player 1 flips the next Travel card, revealing the Lair card. Phase 2 is complete.

Players may now proceed to Phase 3.

PHASE 3 :: The Monster’s Lair

Now that the players have made it to the Monster’s Lair, the real battle begins.

Players refer to the Encounter Chart to see how many monsters will be in the Lair to start. Because there are 4 Players, the Players select 6 of the Giant Rat cards from the Level 1 Monster Deck. The Players then split the deck into Treasure Cards and Event cards. They shuffle each deck separately, then deal out six piles, each containing a treasure card and an event card, and place one of the Giant Rat cards (Healthy side up) on top of the pile. These six piles of cards make up the Lair.

At the beginning of Phase 3, if any Players had played cards during the travel phase, those players draw cards to bring their hand back up to 5 cards.

Starting with the Player that revealed the Lair card, each Player takes turns playing their hand, lying down cards and resolving the effects. Any damage done to the monster is tracked through the use of damage tokens placed on the monster card. Once all Players have made a turn, the hour token is moved and a new round begins.

Play continues until either the Players defeat the monster, or the players decide to withdraw from the fight. At the end of a monster fight (regardless if players defeated the monster or withdrew), all cards that were destroyed are removed from the game. These cards will be shuffled back into their corresponding deck before the next adventure takes place.


PHASE 3 GAMEPLAY EXAMPLE:

Player 1 starts the fight. The Lair is filled with 6 Giant Rats. Because this is the beginning of the 7th hour round, the Players know there will be a Monster Attack following this round. Being such, the Players want to try and finish these Giant Rats off as quickly as possible. Player 1 starts their turn by playing a Poison kit and places a “Wart Moss" card inside it. Player 1 also plays two Thief cards, and a Dagger card. The Thief cards do 2 damage each, but gain a bonus of +1 for each additional Thief played. This brings their damage up to 5 total, plus an additional +1 bonus for the dagger which is a piercing weapon. Player 1 does 6 Damage to one of the Giant Rats, killing it outright. Player 1 then removes the event card and the treasure card out from under the Giant Rat. Flipping the Giant Rat to expose the Dead side. Player 1 reads the Event card: “In a fit of rage, the wounded beast lashes out with a bloodied claw, 2 damage : Gain 2,000 Experience”. Because Player One still has two Thief cards in play, Player One may decide to either take the damage to one of his Thieves, or take direct damage to his overall Life pool. Because the Thief cards only have 2 HP, the blow would kill one of his cards, so Player One opts to take the direct damage, knowing their is a long battle ahead of him and he will need his Thieves. Player 1 removes two health from his Life Pool, bringing him down to 6 Life. Player 1 then reveals the treasure card “Divine Blast”. This is a Cleric Spell, which Player 1 places into his discard pile. Player 1 puts the rest of his played cards into his discard pile, saving for the Poison Kit and Moss cards which stay in play until the end of the Adventure. The Poison Kit is an ongoing card, that Player 1 will be able to continue play cards to throughout Phase Three, hoping to create three vials of poison if they draw the right cards. Player 1 then draws 5 new cards from his deck. It is now Player 2's turn. Play proceeds until the end of Player 4's turn. The Players have been able to kill two Giant Rats, and have severely injured a third. Player 1 moves the Hour Token to the 8th Hour, starting the next round and the Monsters Attack.

MONSTER ROUND EXAMPLE:

At the Beginning of the 8th Hour Round, the Monsters attack. Because the Players have already killed 2 of the 6 Rats, only the remaining four will attack. The Players add up the damage values of the four remaining Giant Rats. They will do a total of 8 damage to the players. The players may decide how this damage is shared amongst them. Using either cards in their hands, in their inventories, or by taking the direct damage to their Life Pools, the Players distribute the damage accordingly.

Note: Players that play a Adventurer Card during a Monster Round must take full damage to that the Adventurer card before any other damage is dealt directly to a Life Pool. (For instance, if there is three damage left to be assigned, Player 2 may not play a Warrior card and say that Warrior is only taking two damage. That Warrior card must take the full damage available on that card. However; If there were only two damage left to be assigned, Player 2 could play a Warrior card, and absorb that extra two damage, without killing the Warrior.

The Players play the following cards:

Player 1 plays a shield which absorbed one damage.
Player 2 is able to Play a Cleric which takes two damage. Killing the Cleric in the process.
Player 3 plays a Smoke Bomb which prevents 2 damage. Destroying the Item in the process.
Player 4 has a set of Armor equipped automatically preventing 2 damage, and agrees to take the 1 remaining damage directly to his Life Pool.

Players then move any cards that were not destroyed to their discard piles, and draw back up to a full hand. Player One starts the next round.


Winning the Fight
As Players do damage to the monster, they will gain loot to add to their decks. The player that makes the killing blow to the monster gets to take the loot. Players may barter or trade for items (Not Adventurer Cards), during their turn. Only cards that are currently equipped or in hand may be traded. However, traded items are placed into each others discard pile and will be available to that Player once it is drawn.

The Adventure is over when all the Monsters have been killed, every Player’s Life pool has been depleted or the Hour Token reaches the 24th hour.

At the end of a Play Session, Players may not conduct any in-town actions until the beginning of the next Adventure. If this play session is done for the moment, each Player may store their cards and gold within one of the provided colored treasure bags.



Card Types

Monster Decks
[i] 70 Cards – 15 Monster Cards (8 Minions cards, 1 Elite (made-up of 2 cards), 1 Boss (made-up of 5 cards). 25 Event Cards, 30 Treasure Cards.

Each Monster Deck is built for a particular level of Adventurers. Players may decide to play the Level 1 monsters repetitively to gain more loot and experience, or they may decide to jump to a higher level for more of a challenge.

Level 1 – Giant Rats

Level 2 – Skeletons

Level 3 – Bandits

Level 4 – Gnolls

Level 5 – Goblins :

Level 6 – Serpents :



Item Cards
All item cards have the same backside artwork. Because a Player may take a merchant card, treasure card, or ransack card into their hand, or sell it to a merchant, this card must be useable from all item piles. Item Cards consist of an Item name, a Gold value to buy/sell, a size, description, keyword and color.

Loot Cards
These are special treasure and magic items that can only be found on monsters. There are different levels of loot cards, dependent upon the Monster Deck they were pulled from. Loot Cards may also include experience points. Once you receive a loot card with an experience point number, collect experience point token equal to that number. These experience points can be spent to upgrade Adventurers or improve weapons.

Merchant Cards
Merchant cards contain everyday items that adventures might take on their quests. Items such as rations, bandages, torches, satchels, craft kits, weapons or spells. If playing a campaign, you might find stolen items appearing in the Merchant piles.

Ransack Cards
Ransack cards are a good way to scrounge up some extra cash, or find an interesting item. Sometimes it’s just extra food for your adventures, antique silverware to sell to the merchants for extra dough, or a seemingly useless bowl of Wart Moss. But every once in a while you may find a truly impressive item. Be careful though. If the authorities catch you with stolen items, you may have to face the consequences.

Black Market
Much like the Ransack Cards, Black Market cards are a combination of seemingly useless or exotic items and weapons. While Ransack Items may be sold, Black Market cards may only be used, traded or removed from the game through another means (eg. potion creation, etc.).

Adventurer Cards
Adventurers are not cheap, and unless they get some gold up front may be hard to pursued into being your hired hands. The Adventurer Card deck contains an assortment of hirable adventurers to add to your party. Some adventures love to work in groups and are more effective when coupled with other members of their class, or some classes like to work alone being less effective when more than one adventurer is on the table. Adventurers have a cost to hire, but once they join your party, with the right amount of experience, you can level them up and watch as they gain more and more skills and powers.

Travel Cards
Travel Cards are used during the travel phase, and are a combination of good, bad and neutral event cards. These cards may include events where adventurers join a players party, players are robbed of gold, or players are all effected by weather conditions. These may also include quests that players can collect and complete or monster ambushes and surprise searches for stolen goods. Travel Cards provide an exciting element to the game, where you never know what might happen on your search for the Monsters Lair.


Adventurers

Adventurer cards feature a specific class of Adventurer. Each Adventurer card has a cost (to hire), an attack number, hit points, keywords, skill and a level up cost.

For Example

Thief
Cost: 3 Gold
Damage 2
Hit Points: 2
Keywords: Piercing • Stealth
Skill: If played sideways, the Thief is stealthed and may stay in play until they attack. Thieves gain +1 attack for each other Thief in play.
Level Up: 2 Gold + 3,000 Experience Points.


Crafting

Crafting items is a unique element of Unfortunate Monsters that allows seemingly useless items to be combined to create powerful objects for the Players. Individually, the crafting elements may be bulky, and dilute a players deck with useless items, but once combined within a crafting kit, these items are removed from the game and are turned into objects that can provide a distinct advantage in battle.

While some crafting components may be found at a merchant, some of the more rare items may only be found from ransacking homes, shopping in the black market, in the Forest or from the corpses of creatures and monsters you encounter throughout the game.

Example of a Crafting Kit:

Fletching Kit

Cost: 4 Gold
Keywords: Crafting
Capacity: 4 Arrows
Recipes:


1. Stone, Plank and Feather : Create 4 Arrows (+1)
2. Rat Fang, Pine, Feather : Create 4 Diseased Arrows (+3 DoT)
3. Bone, Pine, Feather : Create 4 Reinforced Arrows (+2)
4. Bugbear Claw, Sapling, Harpy Feather : Create 4 Thunder Dart (+2 & 2 turn Stun)
5. Serpent Scale, Steel Rod, Goblin Headdress : Create 4 Envenomed Bolt (+3 DD & +3 Dot)

 
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John Farrell
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Re: WIP – Loot Wh*re - A Cooperative Roleplaying Card Game with Campaign Play.
Don't call it Loot Whore, the grief that will cause you here and in the marketplace is just not worth any benefit you could gain from using that provocative name.
 
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Joshua Van Horsen
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Thanks. It was a placeholder name, but I hear ya. The new name doesn't excite me, but at least it's not offensive or otherwise.
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John Farrell
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This is certainly the sort of game that interests me. It sounds a bit like the Pathfinder card game with some more structure. In particular the campaign-style play is a winner.

I'd say a lot of the players over in the 1 Player guild would be interested in this.
 
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