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Subject: Alternative means of tracking attached cards rss

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Epimer
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We find physically moving around stacks of cards (such as a dude with a weapon and a sidekick, as in the tutorial turn) to be quite fiddly. It's also not particularly conducive to learning the cards, as the text on lower cards ends up being obscured (we have the same issue with Mage Wars and Romance of the Nine Empires).

Does anyone have any alternative ways they use to track attached cards? I was thinking of cannibalising some other games for coloured wooden cubes or tokens that I could use to place one such token on the dude and a matching coloured token on the attached card, which is left off the game board.

Have other people done anything similar?
 
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Tomasz Wawrzyszko
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As with other card games that have some attachments.
Take Character card and put under it an attachment, put it in a way so you can read whole text box. Another way to your issue is. Take card, look at name, text box and art. Make a note art=text box or name=text box. It involve remembering each card you gonna use as an attachment.
 
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Alex GB
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We had our first couple of games yesterday - I agree that moving all the cards together is quite fiddly but I think it really helps with remembering which weapons etc have been attached to a dude and just as importantly, whether any attached cards have been booted or not.

If anything I found the most problematic thing was that I kept focusing on the action in the town square and on my opponent's side of the street, whilst forgetting to use dudes on my side!
 
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David Boeren
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Marietta
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Every game uses pretty much the same methods of stacking attachments. You either find a way to overlap them so the most significant bits are visible, or you can put some sort of marker on the card to help remember the effects.

In theory you could put a marker on the card, then put the attachments to the side with a matching marker - but this makes it easy to forget what attachments are there (compared to stacking) so I wouldn't recommend it.
 
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Eric Jome
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Epimer wrote:
I was thinking of cannibalising some other games for coloured wooden cubes or tokens that I could use to place one such token on the dude and a matching coloured token on the attached card, which is left off the game board.


And this wouldn't be fiddly? Now you still have to move things, only they aren't flat and you have a confusing reference array of colored tokens, allowing you to easily forget what is with what.

Stack the cards and play. You'll learn how they all work very quickly.
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Stanton Lackey
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Epimer wrote:
We find physically moving around stacks of cards (such as a dude with a weapon and a sidekick, as in the tutorial turn) to be quite fiddly. It's also not particularly conducive to learning the cards, as the text on lower cards ends up being obscured (we have the same issue with Mage Wars and Romance of the Nine Empires).

Does anyone have any alternative ways they use to track attached cards? I was thinking of cannibalising some other games for coloured wooden cubes or tokens that I could use to place one such token on the dude and a matching coloured token on the attached card, which is left off the game board.

Have other people done anything similar?


This is my experience from every card game I have ever played. The game is set up to where you can efficiently stack the cards with the left hand portion sticking out slightly as to see the bullet ratings and card value. As for knowing what the card is/says, I would just recommend memorizing what the cards do, there aren't that many of them. Remember, you can always reach over and pick up a card and read what it does if your not sure. I think using cubes would just add more complexity, and if losing track of where everything is is your problem then might I suggest Go Fish? (I jest, I jest)
 
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Konstantinos Thoukydidis
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As a personal project I've made custom tokens for resident effects and dudes.

You can see how the dudes look, here: https://plus.google.com/+KonstantineThoukydides/posts/beEmoU...
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Epimer
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DbZer0 wrote:
As a personal project I've made custom tokens for resident effects and dudes.

You can see how the dudes look, here: https://plus.google.com/+KonstantineThoukydides/posts/beEmoU...


That looks great.

I also like the idea of having custom tokens to mark location rather than having multiple stacks of cards spread out over an area larger than the location itself which - EDIT! - it seems you aren't doing but your photo gave me the idea of. Maybe it's ultimately fiddlier but there's no harm in experimenting.
 
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Konstantinos Thoukydidis
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I don't know why you say I'm not doing that. You can see me doing exactly that in my photos
 
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Epimer
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DbZer0 wrote:
I don't know why you say I'm not doing that. You can see me doing exactly that in my photos


Got confused and didn't want to d slander you with my potentially heretical idea
 
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