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Subject: Game about emotions rss

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Kronos Master of all Time
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My wife teaches children that require special care. She started to use board games in her work with great success. However now she has that autistic child who needs to learn about emotions.

We are searching a game (any) which can help him to learn to recognize emotions, and/or teach about behavior in different social situations.

Maybe someone here have some experience with autistic children, any recommendations then would be appreciated.
 
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Doctor Tom
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I haven't ever played this, as I've only just found it online, but what about:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/6-Social-Skills-Board-Games/dp/B001G...

Ages 8 and up, teaches morals, manners, empathy, friendship, showing emotions and managing emotions.

I skimread the reviews on the link and many mentioned autism or Aspergers.
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Tony Go
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If you're having hull problems I feel bad for you son, I've got 99 problems but a breach ain't one.
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TauLeaderGames.com
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...and then, we held hands. uses emotions as its theme, but its a bit abstract.
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Kerstin
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I don't have much experience with this myself, but maybe games with some storytelling aspect?

Somthing like Dixit or "Es war eimal" (don't know the english name right now) might be adjusted to these situations.
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Adam Porter
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You could play a variant of Dixit where all the clues must be emotions. A lot of the cards show emotive situations. Name the card "happiness" or "anger" or "jealousy" etc - perhaps even simplify the scoring so that you score points for each player who selects your card (rather than the "not too obvious; not too obscure" scoring of the basic game).
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Scott Wheelock
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I wouldn't recommend Dixit. Depending on the individual, drawings are a level of abstraction above photos, and cartoony drawings a level above that. That can make it more difficult to process.

Your best bet might be to take pre-made materials focusing on emotions (like these) and work them into a game somehow.

Apart from direct teaching, you can also talk about emotions within the context of a lot of games. In Agricola (to pick a perhaps too-advanced example), you could talk about the farmer being tired after chopping wood, hungry at harvest time, and happy after a new calf is born. That's pretty abstract again, but it all depends on the game and the child.
 
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Jill Reid
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Rory's Story Cubes has 3 sets widely available now. The original has some facial expressions that could be used for discussing and recognizing emotions. But the blue box, Rory's Story Cubes: Actions, has even more types of situations/behaviors and facial expressions. Our nieces and nephews love to tell stories about how the people on the dice feel, and they often make it a story about themselves.
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Alex Cannon
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Horror Leader wrote:
...and then, we held hands. uses emotions as its theme, but its a bit abstract.


It's funny: I've always thought that emotions are abstract.
 
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Kronos Master of all Time
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Thomas Robinson: that really looked promising, unfortunately its not available in Polish language. I even tried to find high quality photos of boards from this particular game, so i could translate it and print it, but no luck.

And the other proposal "...and then we held hands..." that is very interesting. Thanks. Abstract images wouldn't be a problem... But since its about a couple and love relationship, it could be problematic for those boys. They might never in their life experience deep and complex relationship as love. My wife is afraid that would be unfair to them.

Anyway great examples, thanks all.
 
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TTDG
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http://boardgamegeek.com/geeklist/62912/item/1529359#item152... is a list by 1 guy about games he thinks work in counseling type situations. I got there roundabout by hunting for the ungame.

It is not a game, but a sheet of paper that is full of feeling words can be used as a conversation starter. I'd imagine it might help if the adult also participated. You can probably find a copy on the net somewhere. https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=feeling+words Once or twice a day consistently, plus maybe at times of frustration at not having the right words, might gradually help a person bring their inside out.

I suppose you might *make* a game out of it by inverting the process. Put all of the feeling words on spaces, 1 to a space, and landing on the space means you have to 'act out' the feeling. Ugh, I just recommended 'roll and move'. Well, maybe you can spice the game up a bit. If you make it like Parchesi or Sorry, where a player has multiple pawns, they get to choose which one to move and thus which feeling space they will land on. And at the end, they get all of their pawns 'home safe'.

Edit:
Add a 'choose your own emotion' space every so often on the board. On that space, the player can either pick an emotion of their choice to act out, or they move onto a parallel path a bit longer than 6 spaces long and at least 1 longer than the original path. (The message is, you always have choice, but if you choose not to participate you will proceed slower.) But, you might put 'lighter' emotions on the longer paths.

If you play with 3 pawns, a square (cube) can mark the number of pawns that have made it home safe so far (0-3). Why? Because you can keep the same number of choices by recycling pawns that have made it home back to the start (or to their pawn that is closest to start). The game still ends when any 3 of their pawns have made it home.

Heh, I like this game idea enough I might make it myself. But please, if it can help you, make yours now.
 
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