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Subject: How many cards in the game? rss

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Sean Johnstone
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How many cards are in this game and how many per faction?
 
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Michael Wheet
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US & Germany 40 cards.
UK 39 cards.
Soviet Union 34 cards.
Japan 33 cards.
Italy 30 cards.

Total: 216 cards.
 
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Sean Johnstone
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Does the card totals seem to skew the balance in favor of allies or? I'm just trying to read and get a feel for the game, so far I'm impressed!
 
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Barry Miller
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Sean,

Here's an excerpt from my review that might help answer your question. (Go here for the whole review: No Dice, No Charts, & Only A Few Pieces, But Wow!)

A primary reason QMG works so well, as a WWII game specifically, is due to the careful attention paid toward designing each of the decks. As mentioned earlier, this is a game of hand management. Each country’s play is managed by its own deck of cards. Do not underestimate this point: Each country’s deck is very different from one another in both size and content. Despite this deck imbalance, the individual design of each deck ensures a level playing field for the smaller countries, and overall, a balanced game between both sides.

Naturally, the size of each deck represents a country’s depth of power. For instance, the two largest adversaries each have 40 cards, while the smallest (Italy) has 30. The UK, Soviets, and Japan fall in-between.

Regarding content, what the decks do share in common is the same eight types of cards. Most decks have the same consist of types (except as noted): Each county has cards to build navies and armies (place an army or a navy token, if you have one available). Each has cards to conduct land and sea battles (see the “Twilight Struggle” paragraph, above). Each (except the Soviets) has “Economic Warfare” cards (they represent destruction of a country’s industrial power through activities such as strategic bombing, anti-shipping, V-rockets, etc. Damage is inflicted by the opponent discarding a number of cards). Each country (except Japan) has “Event!” cards (the typical catch-all for driving actions which are beyond the boundaries of the normal rules).

Each has “Status!” cards (usually persistent once played, and allow a player to take advantage of certain game conditions as they arise or continue). And finally, each country (except for Germany & the U.S.) has “Response!” cards (as the name implies, allows a player to respond to certain actions for either his, or on a friendly country’s behalf. Also is the closest mechanism this game has to conducting counter-attacks). One note about “Response!” cards – unlike other games, they’re not played from your hand! As a turn, they must be “played” face down in advance of need, and later put into action when called for. Oh, the simple elegance.

OK, so that’s how each deck is similar. Yet its how they’re different that makes the game so intriguing. Of the eight types of cards mentioned above, each country not only has a different mix of all cards, but also different effects from the, “Economic Warfare”, “Event”, “Status!”, and “Response!” cards… I.e., the methods of economic warfare, events, conditions for advantage, and response abilities of each country. While these cards are different from one deck to another, they are not disparate in effect. For instance when you compare the size and scope of the U.S. and Italian decks, there’s an obvious imbalance. Yet upon a closer look you’ll notice that the design of Italy’s deck enables that country to hold its own against the others.

Additionally, all decks appear to be specifically tailored so to mirror (albeit abstractly) the role and behavior of each country during WWII. Perhaps it was some fluke for the one game I played, but I developed the distinct opinion that each country was playing, through its cards, in a very historical fashion. But this is a game afterall, so it doesn’t mean it ends the same as history, as evidenced by the Allies getting their arses kicked! (Oh, did I mention the game has an optional “Mercy Rule”)?
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Sean Johnstone
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Yeah I did read your review, pretty awesome one at that

I'm very close to picking this game up. I hope the expansion provides some more interesting cards.

Another question I've got. How feasible in this game is it for Japan to attack Russia? Or would they just get slammed by the US if they tried?
 
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Randy Dickens II
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I played one game as the Axis where I just could not get any Build Navy cards. I decided to push towards Moscow with the Japanese army and we made it to the outskirts of town. My main goal was to relive pressure off Germany and that worked like a charm. I was not able to do anything after landing next door but it helped turn the tide in my advantage.
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Sean Johnstone
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Interesting. So does it just kind of exhaust the military to push that far into Russia than?
 
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Peter Bakija
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CountingGardens wrote:
Does the card totals seem to skew the balance in favor of allies or? I'm just trying to read and get a feel for the game, so far I'm impressed!


The size of the decks are certainly factored into the game balance--the decks are all very different in composition (the Italians have a lot of ways to get extra VPs; the Soviets have a lot of ways to build armies over and over again; the Japanese have a lot of "reaction" cards; etc.) So while the Allies certainly have more total cards than the Axis (which is an issue on any number of fronts--when you run out of cards, you can't do anything anymore; when you run out of cards and then need to discard more cards, you lose VPs), it is all part of the game design.

In terms of your second question (i.e. "can the Japanese attack the Russians"), I mean, yes? But really, the game isn't as tactical as, say, even Axis and Allies. QMG is a very solid, fun game, but it is, by design, a pretty light one--you can easily play a 6 player game (which is the optimal size, really) to completion in, like, an hour, including set up (assuming everyone is reasonably quick in their decision making).

Things like "can the Japanese attack the Russians (as opposed to the USA)" is, while not completely beside the point, sort of more of a nitty/gritty level than the game gets into. I mean, yes, the Japanese *can* attack the Russians, but the concept of "attack" in QMG is far more abstract than, like, even Axis and Allies (or World in Flames or whatever). You generally only have, like, 5-6 units on the map per country at any given moment, and while you certainly have areas that you focus on (i.e. the Japanese can generally focus on a "lets get into a land war in Asia!" or "Lets fight the US in the Pacific!"; sometimes both; rarely neither), it is all very fluid. You can, as the Japanese say, be very invested in the land war in Asia and very quickly find yourself out of the land war in Asia and instead focused on fighting the US in the Pacific, as that is just how things end up in the game.
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Sean Johnstone
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So the game board typically doesn't have large sprawling armies than? That can be nice actually. I love how approachable this game sounds!
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Peter Bakija
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CountingGardens wrote:
So the game board typically doesn't have large sprawling armies than?


Correct. You generally only have a single unit in a given space (a single power can only have a single unit in a space; you can have multiple units in a given space if each unit belongs to a different power, so, like, the Germans and Italians can each have an army in Western Europe, say). You are counter mix limited, and each power only has, like, somewhere between 7 and 12 total units. Just having played a couple games tonight, most of the time, you have about 4-5 units on the map per power. Sometimes you have only 2 or 3. I think the biggest number of units I saw tonight was the Soviets having an insane sprawl across Asia with 7 or 8 armies total. But units don't really move--you either have a unit in a space or you don't. Combat isn't random or complex--you just play a card and kill a neighboring unit. Once and a while, you have special cards that let you blow up more than 1 unit per turn, or build more than one unit per turn, but those are an exception.
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Jon Snow
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If you are interested, my list of all the cards and their effects (by nation) in in the Files section below.
 
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Sean Johnstone
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Awesome

Am I also correct in saying that air power is represented by deck destruction rather than airforce pieces?
 
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Barry Miller
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CountingGardens wrote:
Awesome

Am I also correct in saying that air power is represented by deck destruction rather than airforce pieces?

Yes.
 
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