richard pearce
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Warm up games and putting games in combination for gaming group.

I just got done playing sheriff of Nottingham last on Saturday evening at a local games store in Seattle and I had a super fun time several weeks previous I have been super interested in another game called Thesis of dark orbit. Both games where super awesome experiences. I like to speculate about how to take the user expense of playing games to the next level in different perspectives/appreciation/heighten of aspects.
-obviously one of the common archetype /category’s in the industry of board gaming is the category of a Filler game witch is certainly one derivative of the speculative general question I am posing for crowd collaboration/brain storm.
Past that this thread the question presentation more generally likely pertains to putting games in combination that may complement one another and or in the different psychology’s all kinds/category’s “warm up” a group of participants for possibly more intense games with introductory games that provide some form of a “warm up” this question can certainly be interpreted as some what philosophical.
This thread is posing a highly open ended question I expect that people will generate many different answers on many different wave lengths and interpret this question very differently please do  !

My first primary examples include:

Liars dice/pirates dice derivatives before examples: Sheriff of Nottingham and or Coup
Da Vinci’s Mancala process into Theseus: The Dark Orbit
 
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richard pearce
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Ps. This is my first thread post on BGG and I was certainly indecisive as to witch category would be best to post this collaborative brain storm question. If any persons that are more experienced on BGG would like to suggest pointing me in different direction possibly to a more appropriate meaning context organizational category please let me know
 
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Randal Marsh
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Let me simplify and clarify your question. What are some combinations of games - varying in length - that use similar mechanics, themes, or require related mental processes and skills?
 
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richard pearce
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yes that is one part of it but not quite completely what i am am asking i am posing the question of games acehving functions with a group of people example in party games a great game that gets people to pull out of there shell then into another game that benefits from that.

example: games have certain aspects, having other games that introduce people to those different aspects before game play

in the game sheriff of knotting ham players as a psuto party bluffing game are trying to sneak there goods thought customs inspector and a common by product is story telling and insincere comedic sales men ship. In the game of snake oil salesmen this is a main stay the players by this essence are much more involved in this aspect and it breaks the ice of possible social expiation of the new group of friends that story telling is not an award verbose process. Thus in this tread post the ult ate goal/result is that when a "test" group of new players that haven't ever met before go to play the sheriff game they are much more well versed at the process/aspects of story telling and co medially lying to the inspector. they are also more socially/emotionally comfortable around one another in this aspect.
it is intuitive certainly tho think of games that use similar mechanics yes but i am proposing other possibility as a brain storm for the enrichment of groups it is meant to be an extremely open ended general question.
 
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richard pearce
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Warm up games
I am suggesting that the games may not always be related by category/aspects as a strategy some games are just great at psychological functions with people and are a great introduction in some context.


One of the points of this is hypothetical about candid human behavior in the science that example who would have thought that having a group of adults first play a game of "pictionary" where there is collaboration and friendly laughter. who would have thought hypothetically that to watch several control groups of candid participants that it leads to a richer game play in some way.
 
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W Scott Grant
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I think I get what you're asking, but I may be off track. You're looking to categorize games not by genre, mechanic or length, but by the type of group or circumstance. Certain mechanics and game length will certainly lead toward various decisions in this grouping.

Let me throw out a few thoughts to this regard:

Hardcore Games: Games that take 2-6 (or more) hours to play, are immersive and typically have complex rules and mechanics. Games like this will sometimes suffer from "analysis paralysis", but are good for a group of players who are committed to playing the entire game, even if the outcome is determined somewhat early. These games often have variants allowing them to be played in multiple ways or with multiple scenarios. Examples include Arkham Horror, Game of Thrones Game, many of the classic Avalon Hill war/simulation games, etc.

Childrens Games: Board games that have a high reliability on luck and, while not necessarily abstract, are somewhat abstracted from real life situations. Examples include Payday, Candy Land, The Game of Life, etc.

Family Games: In this group I place the well-known classic family games. Serious, hardcore gamers scoff at these games because of the random elements (roll dice to move, etc). These games are good for mid-range time periods (1-3 hours), light-weight or well-known rules, and, oftentimes, the ability for players to switch in and out because there's little or no long-term strategy involved. Monopoly is the best example, but there are plenty of others.

Party Games: A large group of players, simple rules, and the primary goal is to make people laugh. Apples to Apples for most, Cards Against Humanity for adult-oriented audiences, Are You a Werewolf fits into this category as well.

Gateway Games: These games bridge the gap between family and hard-core games. These games are typically built around one or two mechanics, have a decent level of immersion, and are easy to learn and fun to play by hardcore and non-gamers alike. Most games by Rio Grande and Mayfair fall into this category, but it also includes Ticket to Ride and Dominion. Time frame for these is 30-90 minutes.

Filler Games: Often card games and dice, these are games that generally take less than 30 minutes to play and are easy to learn. While many are random in nature and lack decisions and strategy, they aren't completely devoid of decision making. What comes to mind are games like Totally Renamed Spy Game, Martian Dice, Zombie Dice, Love Letter, etc.

Workplace Games: These are games where co-workers in an office can get together and play either during lunch or after work. Lunch hour is limited to about 45 minutes (playing time), and after work limits to 2-3 hours at the most (gotta get up and work the next day). These games offer light-weight decision making to break up a hard day at the office, though can typically be more complicated from a rules/mechanics perspective. The gamers where I work like the challenge of trying out newly published games.

In no way shape or form do all games fit into these categories, nor do I expect this list of categories to be all inclusive. Not only that, games may fit into more than one of the categories I've proposed. The point of this categorization idea is not the perspective of genre (historical, fantasy, SF, etc) or mechanic (resource, worker placement, deck builder, etc) or any of the other commonly used categories. I think the point (as I go back and re-read the last post by the OP), is that it would be good to know what types of games are good for what types of circumstances and the group of players. You're not likely going to get far proposing Axis and Allies with the grandparents at Thanksgiving, nor would I recommend Cards Against Humanity in an elementary school classroom. If you have players that take things personally, despite the game mechanics, don't play Munchkin or Werewolf. On the other hand, if you have players that like to "play the part", try The Resistance, Battlestar Galactica, or Shadows Over Camelot.
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I thought it was more that, say you wanted to play Puerto Rico as the main event of a game night, what would be a good game to play to get into the feel of Puerto Rico, but is shorter and lighter? The answer in this case might be San Juan or Jungle Rumble. Like PR, they are both games where, when one player takes an action, other players take a lesser version of the same action.

And I thought the OP wanted to know what other pairs of games might exist where one game could be used to get your brainwaves flowing in the right way for something similar but meatier.

I think (if I'm right), the best suggestion might be to come up with a list of games that you'd like to find a match for, and ask on the recommendations forum. Even if you don't have a list of games in mind, the recommendations fourm is probably the best place to ask.
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