Tom Vasel
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Interviews by an Optimist # 103 - Chris Palermo

Chris says this about himself…

I’ve been intrigued by games for as long as I can remember, starting in elementary school, when I designed my own ‘Dice Baseball’ game. Sports games have always been my true passion; I can also recall converting Mille Bornes into a cross-country ski game, and designing a dice-based ski-jumping game (apparently, inspired by the Winter Olympics).

In terms of mainstream games, I began with RPGs, starting clubs in my local library and school. For a few years, that was the entire scope of my gaming. In 8th grade, I was introduced to Statis Pro Baseball, which was an eye-opening experience – here was a game that had done what I’d try to replicate as a child. More than just exposing me to that game, I then learned about Avalon Hill, and proceeded to start buying their line of sports games pretty heavily (as well as other sports games).

By high school, I’d migrated to war/boardgames for my multi-player games of choice, learning/playing Iliad (GDW), Swords and Sorcery (SPI) and War of the Ring (SPI). I never looked back, and really, since then, have played precious few RPGs.

I attended my first Avaloncon/WBC in 1996 or 1997 and was exposed to MANY games, including my first Euro (Settlers of Catan). The breaking point (where gaming stopped being a hobby and became an obsession) came in 1998, with the sale of Avalon Hill. The latter caused me to decide, rather quickly, to invest in the AH catalog. I located a store in Connecticut, and, with the size of my order getting me a 30% discount, promptly dropped approximately $1200 on games. Thus began the addiction.

The Long Island Boardgaming Organization (LIBO) began because I wanted to get through my collection (probably about 700 non-sports games and maybe 300 sports games, at this point). Previous attempts to host meetings had failed, and the clubs I joined in my area were all more interested in playing the newest and greatest games. LIBO is very organized and doesn’t focus on any type of game, playing new games and old games equally.

I’ve been intrigued by games for as long as I can remember, starting in elementary school, when I designed my own ‘Dice Baseball’ game. Sports games have always been my true passion; I can also recall converting Mille Bornes into a cross-country ski game, and designing a dice-based ski-jumping game (apparently, inspired by the Winter Olympics).

In terms of mainstream games, I began with RPGs, starting clubs in my local library and school. For a few years, that was the entire scope of my gaming. In 8th grade, I was introduced to Statis Pro Baseball, which was an eye-opening experience – here was a game that had done what I’d try to replicate as a child. More than just exposing me to that game, I then learned about Avalon Hill, and proceeded to start buying their line of sports games pretty heavily (as well as other sports games).

By high school, I’d migrated to war/boardgames for my multi-player games of choice, learning/playing Iliad (GDW), Swords and Sorcery (SPI) and War of the Ring (SPI). I never looked back, and really, since then, have played precious few RPGs.

I attended my first Avaloncon/WBC in 1996 or 1997, and was exposed to MANY games, including my first Euro (Settlers of Catan). The breaking point (where gaming stopped being a hobby and became an obsession) came in 1998, with the sale of Avalon Hill. The latter caused me to decide, rather quickly, to invest in the AH catalog. I located a store in Connecticut, and, with the size of my order getting me a 30% discount, promptly dropped approximately $1200 on games. Thus began the addiction.

The Long Island Boardgaming Organization (LIBO) began because I wanted to get through my collection (probably about 700 non-sports games and maybe 300 sports games, at this point). Previous attempts to host meetings had failed, and the clubs I joined in my area were all more interested in playing the newest and greatest games. LIBO is very organized and doesn’t focus on any type of game, playing new games and old games equally.


Tom: Tell us a bit about this organization of the club...

Chris: For years, I'd attempted to set up impromptu Gaming events with my friends and family. I had been buying games at an ungodly pace, and really had no one to play them with. My wife and I would play some games, but a great many sat unplayed. Unfortunately, as my friends and I got older, and moved from our 20s to our 30s, our free time seemed to shrink even more than before. Scheduling a day where we could play 4, 5 or 6 games was becoming harder and harder.

In 2003, I had a series of GameDays that I was hosting -- where we'd provide food, etc., and in rapid succession, each time, more than half the potential attendees bailed out. Irritated, I decided, instead, to join another group, which I did. However, almost immediately, I saw ways I could create my own group that would truly meet my needs and expectations.

I realized that part of the reason people canceled was because nothing was ever 'scheduled,' so we began scheduling 4 month blocks (not hard, since our inaugural meeting was in September 2003). Currently, we schedule one Saturday GameDay and one Friday GameNite each month, with the Friday evening get-together essentially reserved for replaying games from the Saturday GameDay.

I realized people would continue to come if they had a reason -- besides having fun -- so, with a spreadsheet in hand from Randy Cox, and armed with some statistical ideas from Arthur Field, I created a slew of statistics, which LIBO tracks after every gaming get together. These statistics are tracked for a full year, with certain stats being designated as "award stats." At the end of the year, those winners receive award plaques, which are paid for with the dues the club collects.

Over time, this number of statistics has increased fairly dramatically. Normally when someone in the club makes a statement like, "wouldn't it be great if...", they've since learned to not make such idle comments, as typically that results in them being asked to do something to facilitate such statistics being kept.

For example, one such member - Bill - once opined that it would be interesting to see if different players played games with different mechanics better. This became a group-wide effort to categorize each game's theme and mechanic. This task is still ongoing, but fortunately, it will have longer lasting implications. Our monthly GameDays are typically themed -- for now, they're themed by publisher (so, a given GameDay may only feature Mayfair Games or Avalon Hill Games); eventually, with this new information, we'll be able to have themed days by mechanics or game theme.

Of course, another hallmark of LIBO is its relatively new bi-monthly online publication, INDEPTH. Ever since we began, we've had 'writeups' of the games we've played. Initially, those were placed on our website; but, finally, about a year ago, I decided to compile them into a magazine format. I don't have much experience as a graphic designer, but I was a magazine editor for about 10 years, so I have some rudimentary knowledge. I think it's really developed so far, as we've expanded the magazine to include not only session reports but also reviews, strategy articles, gamer personality interviews and reports on LIBO splinter groups (like the Heroscape League and Strat-O-Matic Football League).

We do feature some other things that make us slightly different. All games played each GameDay are selected by me, although I do use games from each player's collection to make up the offering. We track the players who perform the worst each month, and those players, at the next GameDay, are able to select a game to be played (in addition to those I choose). We also use randomized table and seat assignments - those players who play the worst get a free table choice. In addition, those people who turn in writeups, etc., on time, also qualify for a free table choice -- so players that really wish to avoid a game (or really want to play a different game) can do so.

Tom: What made you decide to start up Indepth?

Chris: Laziness, predominantly. As I mentioned, from the start, LIBO had always done writeups. Very few members are active on BGG, so very few writeups made it 'to the masses.' From the beginning, we loaded all the writeups on our website, but a host of difficulties emerged. First, it was nearly impossible to get pictures and text on the same page, because it would take too long to load. Second, there was no real traffic to speak of. Finally, there was no real way to control how much stuff would eventually get posted -- eventually, it would become laborious to navigate the site.

In July 2005, I decided that it made sense to create an e-zine. This way, reviews/reports would get published to a specific issue. In so doing, a number of things happened: the overall writing elevated in quality; we were able to match pictures with text for a 'full version'; and there was a sense of 'completeness' to the writeup. Initially, I'd wanted to really set up the magazine, so it could be printed (in 4-page sections), but that became impossible. I settle now for simply ensuring every issue is even-paged.

Granted, some of INDEPTH isn't very interesting if you don't know the people. I think the hope was that people would start to 'identify' with individuals from LIBO -- since many have unique personalities (as an aside, there's an interesting page on our website: http://www.libogroup.com/ourselves.htm that uses a thread from BGG a few years back to ask people how they saw themselves, in terms of style of play; and how they saw others). Even still, we've tried to include more interesting things in each issue: coverage of our splinter leagues, reviews of games, strategy articles, game puzzles and gamer personality interviews.

That's also why there's a marked difference in quality from the issues prior to July 2005 and the subsequent issues. All the pre-July issues were assembled post-event, which made the issues a bit bare. From July-on, I think every issue has improved; sometimes due to others' recommendations (e.g., the idea for a year-end index was a suggestion from a reader).

Tom: How has feedback been for it?

Chris: Better than I expected; not as good as I would've hoped!

In all seriousness, it does seem as though the fan base is growing. It helps that people keep 'finding' us, and posting on BGG, for example, which only helps OTHERS find it.

I'm to blame for much of the lag - I want to get the XML feed up; want to redesign the website; want to get it listed on many of the search engines; but there are only so many hours in the day.

What I find interesting are some of the stats from the website -- in 2005, we had nearly 6000 unique visitors, with the INDEPTH page getting the most hits. Of those visitors, 13% added us as a favorite or bookmark.

In 2006, so far, we've already had more than 4000 unique visitors, with 11% adding us as a favorite (I think the unique visitors reset each year, but I'm pretty sure the favorites does not).

In April, which was the first bi-monthly issue we released, 19% added us as favorites, which is great! And, to be sure, the day INDEPTH is 'announced' on BGG is always one of our biggest (3383 hits out of the 28000 for the month). But, what is truly encouraging is that the visitors 1) seem to be spending longer on the site, and 2) seem to be selecting more pages (2005 - under 4 pages per visit; 2006 - almost 5.5 pages per visit).

I think, overall, once I'm able to get the redesigns done and get the site and magazine added to more search engines, we'll really see an increase in visitors. We took a big hit this past year, when we were scheduled to attend the New York Toy Fair and were unable to go, due to the massive blizzard -- that would've helped our exposure immensely.

But, so far, everyone that has looked at the magazine SEEMS to like it -- it's getting the word out that is the tricky part.

Tom: Tell us about the time and effort that goes into putting this together. Ever thought about making a paper version?

Chris: Wow - well, it's a LOT of time and effort, obviously. Most people who hear about it, wonder why I do it at all!

Obviously, the first step occurs on the GameDays themselves, when people volunteer to do their writeups. I try to ensure no one ever does more than two, and more typically, more than one. We have some outstanding writers - Michael Albergo, Andrew DiGregorio...really do an exemplary job of reviewing the game with great insight, and providing engaging, illustrative session reports. Many others to a good job as well; those are the first two to jump out. Additionally, Bill Herbst is probably THE most valuable person, because, besides doing an equally great job with reviews, etc., he also comes up with great ideas and does those stories, as well. Our Strategy Articles, Designer Interviews -- he designs the questions. The Game Puzzle is designed by him. Most of the things that make our magazine a more quality publication are completely due to him.

Getting writeups is always tough - people sign up, but real-life interferes, quite often. We've tried several different things; the newest 'project' is to award people game choices at our GameDays, which are rescinded if their writeups are late. This sounds AWFULLY harsh, and makes it sound like work -- and, unfortunately, for me, it's close to that, because the amount of time I need to spend is substantial, and I cannot begin until I have the writeups. So, although it sounds awfully Draconian, it's necessary.

Anyways, once I've gotten the writeups, my job begins. The first thing I do is copy-edit every writeup. That means reading it, and correcting spelling, grammar, etc. I spent 10 years as a magazine editor, so this is one component of INDEPTH I feel fully comfortable performing. An average issue (now) will probably have 14-18 articles (plus other features), so it's fairly time-consuming.

I then have to edit all the photos. I'm not a graphic artist, so much of the photo and layout work is very rudimentary. All the photos need to be converted, so they'll print well (since INDEPTH is intended to be both an online publication AND one that can be printed and read like a standard print magazine).

After that, I need to run the copy to determine the length. Also, I need to enter the scores and ratings into our "Game in a Box" graphic that accompanies all the reports. When I determine how long the piece will be (based on copy length, # of photos and the graphic), I can determine how many pages I need to assign, and which pages in particular. This is the 'mock-up' phase, where I essentially 'lay-out' the magazine on paper, before doing it on the computer.

After some minor tweaks to each page (dates, etc.), I follow my lay-out, and generate the magazine. Now that we're a bi-monthly magazine, I think each issue will average around 40-56 pages. Once all the articles are done, I have to capture our statistics from our Excel spreadsheet - convert those to images, and drop them into the pages. Then, save the whole thing as a PDF, and upload to the site.

This is a highly simplified version of the tasks - total time for everything, from the editing on, is probably somewhere in the ballpark of 12-16 hours per issue, not including the statistics compilation or my own articles I need to write.

As far as a paper version goes, INDEPTH, as I mentioned, is intended to be printed out to BE a paper version - that's why there's always an equal # of pages, and why everything is set up to be printed on an 8.5 x 11 sheet of paper. This is different from blogs or other online magazines, where there's no need to ensure everything 'fits on the page', since it's far easier to accomplish when not restricted by margins, etc.

But, to actually PRINT INDEPTH, to distribute it, will probably not happen. Printing is expensive, as is distribution. My time investment would increase, probably triple the amount it is now, PLUS there'd be a financial burden on me. The only way to offset that would be to sell advertising (or subscriptions), and, I think we fit a nice niche right now...we don't sell ad space, so we can completely retain objectivity; and we don't sell subscriptions, so we can be fairly well-read.

That's really the best I could hope for -- I'm quite willing to give of my time, freely; but moving to a pay-based model would probably kill INDEPTH, I think...

Tom: As a writer yourself, what other internet pages or paper resources would you recommend?

Chris: Hmmm...that's a tough one. As far as games go, I think BoardGameGeek is pretty much in a be-all, end-all category when it comes to writing. However, I'm also aware that blogs and news sites are popping up almost daily. I know Rick Thornquist's site features some great writing, but I get over there so rarely...

For non-game writing, it gets even tougher. Clearly, the first step towards improving one's writing skills is improving one's READING skills; so, as far as advice, I always just recommend people try to read whatever they can, whenever they can. I have a host of writing sites that I refer to on occasion, but again, with time so fleeting, and having to deal with this whole "gainfully employed" status, my time to delve into more enjoyable pursuits is limited

Tom: How strictly run is your gaming group? Do you have set rules, set times?

Chris: LOL - well, here's the part where I hope my members DON'T read your article!

Yeah I think we're pretty structured. Strict isn't a word I'D use, but I'm sure some others would.

We meet, basically, once a month, on a Saturday - normally the late-middle of the month - and we meet from 11am, until everyone gets tired (sometime around 1am). This allows us 1) to play long games, when we want to; and 2) to play a LOT of games, when we want to.

Typically, we use 'themes' for our GameDays, although, a massive project to categorize each game is still ongoing. Right now, the only 'themes' we use are manufacturer -- eventually, we'll be able to have theme/mechanic days, where we can play games that are auction games and ancients games.

Before the GameDay, once everyone has committed to attending, I'll set up the list of games. Some players, occasionally, will also get a choice of a game; but most of the time, I just make up the complete list, pulling games from each of our respective collections.

The 'strictest' part comes after the GameDay, when the articles for INDEPTH are due. I normally run statistics immediately after the GameDay (and my new program, thankfully, has reduced the time from around 6-8 hours down to around 15 minutes!). The articles are another story. Obviously, it's tough, because, the more time that passes, the harder it is to remember and write about the game effectively.

We've tried many different options. Our newest option, probably, is the best, because it rewards those who DO the writeups. Every GameDay, people will want to play one game over another. Typically, there are always two games being played at one time (occasionally three!). We use seating cards to randomize tables and seats for all participants. Each member AUTOMATICALLY receives one free table choice (meaning, they still get a randomized seat, but they can CHOOSE the game they wish to play), PROVIDED they turned in their writeup on time the previous month. If not, the free choice is gone.

Additionally, twice a year we have Players' Choice GameDays, where each player can select a game, regardless of theme, to be played. Again, if writeups in the previous months have all been submitted on time, the player retains that choice; otherwise, it too is lost.

We also meet once a month on a Friday evening, for a Replay GameNite, which, typically, means we can replay games from the previous session. With nearly 1000 unique games in the group, games come out so sporadically, so the opportunity to replay a game is pretty valuable. These evenings tend to be less strict, because there are normally fewer people (typically fewer than 6) - so there's no need to have more than one game played at any time.

Tom: Don't those who don't enjoy writing consider this unfair?

Chris: What's your point? (no, I'm kidding!)

I think, yes, it's been one of those 'sticking points' in the group so far -- actually, not the WRITING, per se; but the deadlines (a little more than a week). However, there's a very definite minority that simply doesn't really pay attention to the deadlines.

We had actually started out - in the beginning - with everyone writing about every game they played. This got chaotic, because everyone wrote their thoughts as soon as the game was over and then turned in sheets to me -- I then had to 'edit' and cobble together a coherent article based on all the different assessments. Even there, we had some people who would need extra paper; and some who summed up the game in 2 sentences.

When you realize what our origin was, suddenly, writing about ONE game, a WEEK later, is nothing, comparatively. And, to be honest, as I said, no one in the group really complains about doing the writeups -- they see the fruition of their work, and everyone thinks INDEPTH is a pretty valuable resource.

That being said, if I suddenly decided to stop publishing and told the group there'd be no more writeups, I can't think of one person that would argue with me.

Now, when we recruit players, they all know up front they'll be expected to do one writeup a month -- it's understood. And, because of that, there's far less resistance.

There are virtually no expectations about the specific articles, either. While it would be GREAT to think everything would be award-wining, some of it isn't, and that's okay too. I think it adds to the charm of the publication

Tom: Does doing writeups produce positive effects on individuals as gamers? Are people afraid to come because they don't want to do any "work"?

Chris: I've never had anyone not come, because they didn't want to do the writeups. I think they may gripe about it; but they all view it as something that comes with the territory. We offer a great deal of things that other groups don't; and sometimes, there's an investment required on the part of the members.

I'd like to think there's a positive effect. I know some members definitely read the issues, and read what other members say. Some members read to get a review on a game they were considering buying, and didn't get to play. I know I've personally added and subtracted games from my wish list, just by reading a colleague's writeup on the game.

It's not ideal (and, I don't know what would make it ideal), but for now, the situation seems to be working. I think my group is just happy that it's been a while since I had a new 'idea' (although, I have noticed fewer of them make comments like, "hey, wouldn't it be great if we could..." around me anymore!)

Tom: With all the writing you do, what tips do you have for a prospective board game designer?

Chris: I don't know if the amount of writing I do necessarily affords me any additional insight into my tips for board game designs, but I'll try to answer this anyway

To me - and this is exclusively my opinion - the single most important thing a game can offer is well-presented, organized, easy-to-understand rules. Nothing is more frustrating than purchasing a new game, rushing it to the table, and spending far too much time trying to decipher what the rules are supposed to be.

I think, additionally, player aids are also proving valuable - all you need to do is look on BoardGameGeek at the number of aids being generated as files, to see that people really think they're incredibly functional (and, in some cases, necessary).

My own personal pet peeves - since my group tracks SO many statistics, I really would love every designer to have tie-breaking rules, as well as a scoring mechanism. Not that my group is hyper-competitive, because we're not; but since so much of our statistics are based on score, etc., a game that doesn't offer ANY scoring mechanism really thwarts the program.

But, I think the first two are hands-down the best advice. It doesn't matter if your game features nice bits, great new mechanics, a rich theme, borrows from the best games - if players can't understand your rules, it won't get played, and the word-of-mouth advertising will be non-existent.

Tom: Let's talk about your favorite games, then. What are the groups' favorite games? What about you personally? And what games are you most looking forward to?

Chris: We actually have a LIBO Hall of Fame - based on specific criteria, a list is generated for members to vote on. Those games receiving the requisite number of votes automatically gain entry to the LIBO Hall of Fame; our first 'class' included Atlantic Storm, El Grande and Puerto Rico.

The group has a pretty eccentric feel - some like the aesthetic games, like Descent and Arkham Horror. Others go for the more straightforward brainburners like Tigris & Euphrates and Princes of Florence.

Personally, my favorite games are Age of Steam, Advanced Civilization and Vinci. But, for the most part, I'll try almost any game once, normally twice, and then I'll still try it if I find variants or rules fixes (if I had not planned on playing it again). I'll play any number of sports simulaton games, as well.

LIBO has a great diversity, which makes the group so dynamic. We do play primarily Euros, but we have a Wargame Day, and a Sports game Day. We also just wrapped up a really successful/fun Heroscape league, which will be something we continue year over year.

Tom: Who brings the games to the club? Do you have community games?

Chris: The group is a nice mix of collectors and non-collectors. There are about 6 of us who collect games (with collections ranging from probably 75 games up to around 900 games), and the rest of the group doesn't really collect (they may have a handful, but no one with more than 20, and almost certainly no unique titles).

We rotate hosting duties around 4 people - 2 of whom handle GameDays, typically, and 2 of whom handle GameNites. When it's at my house, it's easy, because I can just bring up games from the basement. At someone else's, I'll pack just the games we're playing.

When I make up the game lists for the day, I'll try to pull games from each person's collection, so that no one has to lug too many games. But, no, we don't have a 'community' area where all the games are stored, unfortunately...

Tom: What do you have planned for the future - any big ideas or plans?

Chris: Oh, I always have big ideas and plans; it's the time that keeps things from getting done.

Moving INDEPTH to an every-other-month schedule was a huge time-saver, so that will continue. I'm working now on plotting out a pretty substantial redesign of our web page, including an RSS feed for INDEPTH (not a true feed; just one to let people know when a new issue is released), and a dynamic, real-time database for the games owned by the group. Plus, of course, all the aesthetics will change, hopefully.

We had a MILD redesign of INDEPTH, just recently, so that'll probably be good for two years or so...then, I may look to flex some creativity muscles again.

The Spreadsheet program we designed to keep our stats was a MAJOR project that I worked on from December - March of this year, so that was a huge accomplishment. Two things will happen with that going forward, however:

1) All the games we own as a group will be categorized by theme & mechanic, as well as by game weight (just a scale of 1-3). In doing so, we'll actually generate 'weighted' stats (potentially more meaningful), and for curiosity, we'll be able to tell who plays auction games the best; who plays area control games the best; who plays games set in ancient times the best. All of which will be interesting fodder for INDEPTH, as well.

2) I'll need to take the entire spreadsheet and transfer if completely into a database program. While the spreadsheet works fine now; and - quite honestly - has cut my 'stat-tracking' time from 4-5 hours every GameDay to about 15 minutes, it's still a HUGE spreadsheet (about 40mb), and really needs to be placed into a database environment.

Tom: Chris, you mention that your board game plays any kind of games. How do wargames, collectible card games, miniatures, and role playing games fit in? Do any of them tend to dominate other games, or have you excluded any of them?

Chris: We do have one Wargame Day a year - where the day is devoted to just wargames. More often than not, when it comes to wargames, the members will just set up meetings outside the normal get-togethers. This is easy to do, since primarily, wargames are 2-player affairs.

We haven't really done any CCGs, but they are on tap for the future -- I just need to do some restructuring of our database to facilitate that.

No one is really into miniatures - 2-3 of us have Warhammer sets; largely unassembled and unpainted...The group DID get into Heroscape in a big way, however, and just wrapped up our inaugural Heroscape league, which was a tremendous amount of fun, and already has people looking forward to October, when we'll kick off the second season.

RPGs have long been on my 'to do' list; and, we actually set up another splinter group to play RPGs -- however, the one thing that thwarts most of our plans -- TIME -- gets in the way. It's hard to do an RPG on anything other than a weekend; and most of the members have families, etc., where weekends are tough to free up. So, for now, RPGs are out (but the Pollyanna in me keeps trying to find a way to work it back into our rotation).

To be sure, all these other genres are dwarfed by the amount of Eurogames and card games we actually play; but none is excluded for any primary reason besides lack of time. If we were all millionaires (or college students, same thing as far as this is concerned), and were meeting on a 'couple-of-times a week' basis...rest assured, all these genres would be getting some playing time (and I'd be able to PAY someone to assemble and paint my Warhammer figures!)

Tom: Chris, thanks for taking the time to answer these questions. Do you have any final thoughts for our readers?

Chris: I think it's important to know that I would never prescribe my approach to EVERY game group that exists (or starts up). For my group, this has *mostly* worked; and I know that other groups are equally as 'strict' (and, in some cases, stricter ), but I'm also aware of groups that are equally successful with a far less rigid approach.

I modeled my group, in many ways, using the format of the World Boardgaming Championships, since that was what I was most familiar with. So, many of the features - the plaques, the scheduling, etc., owe their origin to the convention.

Most important, to me, is that no one ever be 'discouraged' from gaming. So, when we do get prospective members that - for some reason - aren't a good fit for the group, I try to get them into other groups that have different focuses or structures from my group. The social dynamic of LIBO is really, in many ways, the aspect that makes us different from many other groups. Even still, the very LAST thing I want to do is ever deny someone an opportunity to play games.

Tom, thank YOU for asking some really insightful questions. I really had a blast with this (as I suspected I would!), and I greatly appreciate the opportunity!

Edited by Tom and Laura Vasel
June 26, 2006
"Real men play board games"
 
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Chris
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TomVasel wrote:
(as an aside, there's an interesting page on our website: http://www.libogroup.com/ourselves.htm that uses a thread from BGG a few years back to ask people how they saw themselves, in terms of style of play; and how they saw others).



Just to clarify - since this interview was completed, the LIBO site has undergone a massive overhaul...that page can now be located at:

http://www.libogroup.com/libomembers.htm

Chris
 
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