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World War II: Barbarossa 1941» Forums » Rules

Subject: Assault questions rss

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Patrick van Gompel
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I have a few questions about assaulting, see examples below.


The Germans are attacking the town. The PzII is ordered suppression fire at the (already weakened) Soviet infantry. And, the German infantry will then assault them.


The PzII rolled amazingly well and killed the Soviet infantry. Though, the PzII was then killed by the Soviet AT-gun which also rolled very well.
Anyway, with the Soviet infantry now being removed from the gameboard, the German infantry could not assault this unit anymore.
Question is: what happens next?
Does the German infantry still roll for close combat and attack the AT-gun instead? Or does the AT-gun fire only or none at all?

Then, some more questions arose for the next turn.
If the PzIII assaults the AT-gun, the gun will be flanked. So the AT-gun will have to roll for fortitude. If it fails, will the German infantry also benefit from this when it rolls for it's firetest?
Because of the tank panic ability, does the AT-Gun need to roll again for fortitude? In other words: does it matter from which side a tank assaults a unit with this ability?

An AT-gun can never move from a close combat both voluntarily and forced, because the unit has the 'withdraw' order box, right?

A unit needs to either be ordered to defend or ambush to occupy a trench. Since the AT-gun is engaged in close combat it can no longer be given those orders. Will it just pop out of the trench?

If an AT-gun is in a trench, does it really take 3 turns to only change kill zone (1 to withdraw and 2 to deploy)? That seems a bit harsh to me. It would have been rather foolish then to entrench the AT-gun, since you can quite easily flank it and be untouched for a couple of turns.
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Hello!
Sorry for the delay in getting answers to you, but hopefully this will help you out:

Question 1: Even though the Resolution Phase is divided into steps to make it easier to play the game, it is still assumed that the units are executing their orders more or less at the same time. Units fire before they move because, well, bullets move faster then soldiers do. But soldiers ordered to assault a position will continue to execute that order. In your example, that means that the German infantry will still assault the Soviet-occupied hex, even though their original target (the Soviet infantry) was eliminated. Once they arrive in the hex, they discover that their initial target isn't there any more, so they must assault the other defenders in that hex (in this case the ATG).

Question 2: The biggest weakness of most guns is the fact that they are large, heavy, and difficult to move. In the game, this is represented by the Withdraw and Deploy orders. This makes them particularly vulnerable to an assault from an enemy unit. If the enemy reaches the gun position, they can't get away! Basically, this means that a deployed unit cannot retreat from close combat (it would be impossible for them to drag their guns away from the fight fast enough to get away from the enemy). If such a unit is forced to retreat, it is instead destroyed (we assume that the gunners are forced to abandon their weapons when they run, effectively destroying the unit).

Question 3: Once a unit occupies a trench, it remains in that trench until it is ordered to leave (by receiving an order such as Move Out). If that unit is assaulted by the enemy, it will remain in the trenches, using that fortification to help resist the attackers. So, any unit (including deployed guns) that are located in a trench continue to receive the benefits during close combat. (Note that unlike terrain, the attacker does not receive the entrenchment bonus. Yes, this means that assaulting an enemy in a prepared position is a dangerous proposition!)

Question 4: Yes, it really does take 3 turns for a deployed gun in a trench to change direction, and yes it is very harsh. Trenches are built facing in a particular direction. In order for the guns to face in a different direction, they will need to withdraw from the trench, change facing, and redeploy—a very time consuming process. This does mean that you must be very careful when you choose to deploy your guns in trenches: since they cannot move very easily, they are vulnerable to being outflanked.
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More answers:

When a unit is assaulted from the flank or rear, it must make a Fortitude test. If that unit fails the test, it will fight the resulting close combat at a reduced ability. This will affect ALL of the close combats that unit fights in that round. So, in your example, the besieged Soviets are going to have to fight both the PzIII and the Infantry with the reduced close combat score.

As far as the Tank Panic goes, however, that will not force a second Fortitude test. Each "event" in the game can only trigger a maximum of 1 Fortitude test. All actions that occur simultaneously all count as a single "event" for this purpose. So, for example, if a unit was assaulted by two tanks and two flanking units during the same Assault Step, it would still only have to make 1 single Fortitude test, not 4.

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Patrick van Gompel
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Thank you so much! It's all very clear now. I do like the rules as you explained them, although we will think twice about putting At-guns in trenches.
Thanks again for putting time into answering questions. This really helps to appreciate the game.
 
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