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Subject: Deck building HELP rss

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Ryan-Iver Klann
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I have been dying to give this game a try, and a fellow gamer said he will gladly be my opponent so we can learn the game. I have acquired all but 10 cards of the 101361 expansion (missing 8 rares and 2 URS), and I have about 300 of mostly commons and uncommons from the Premier series. I do have a handful of rares from that set, like Agents Krycek and Skinner, Alien bounty hunter, Alien harvester, Shotgun, a couple rare combat cards, and 2x Teamwork and 1 Not on the menu. I would like to build 2 fun, competitive decks with some (but not too much) strategy so we can learn this game. I've heard this game is like 'Clue on speed', and I LOVE Clue! And, being a huge fan of the show, I really want to believe (pun intended) that this game is awesome-sauce. Any deck ideas would be much appreciated! Thanks!
 
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Michael Schwarz
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Ugh... Alien Harvester.

Anyway, one of the downsides with the game was, there really only were a couple ways you could build your decks.

Okay, not quite, but deck construction was a little weird.

For a 60 card deck, you need roughly 16 sites, these should be split pretty evenly between all four questions. If you're using Mono sites, that's easy, but expensive, and prone to bogging down. If you're using multi sites, it's harder to multitask your agents, but you're less likely to end up with sites that only focus on questions you already know the answers to, until very late in the game.

Also, mono sites can be flushed from your hand for your conspiracy pool at a better rate.

Personally, I usually go with 8 multi sites, and 8 mono sites, with an even split between the question types.

When picking sites you want to also make sure they're skill prereqs are ones your agents can actually make on their own, without equipment or witnesses.

For the rest of your deck, you want to split roughly evenly between Active and Conspiracy cards.

For Active cards, you want a mix of cheap cards that will help you deal with sites or predictable issues. Witnesses and equipment to help clear bluffs. Cards like Government Car and Geiger Counter can be useful to boost agents so they can clear a site on their own.

Shotgun's biggest value is actually to be sold. At least in my experience. But, I also tend to run cards like Fast Draw and Running Gun Battle, so the once per combat limitation becomes problematic.

Combat is incredibly costly (for the conspiracy player), which means you probably won't deal with it much, unless you're specifically building your deck for it.

When you get into your conspiracy cards, you need to keep a close eye on their costs. Unlike when you're playing as the Agents, your conspiracy doesn't generate resources on it's own. This makes stuff like Rejuvenating Caves incredibly useful, even if it is a long term payout.

Krycek is also very useful for funding a conspiracy deck, if planned right. His ability converts res to CP as it's being generated. It starves your agents, but it makes fielding an Alien Bounty Hunter with Ambush a lot more manageable.

The primary focus for conspiracy cards should be bluffs and events that shut down your opponent's investigations. Cards like Eliminating the Source can be very useful for shutting your opponent's deck down for multiple turns, at a fraction of what a single adversary would cost.

Cards like The Video Trap and Captive Hybrid give you nice cost saving measures or more ways to mess with your opponent.

Adversaries are your tactical nuke options. You can flat out kill opposing agents for less than an Alien Bounty Hunter will cost. Cards like Red Haired Man, The Mechanic, The Sandman, and Crew-Cut Man are all solid workhorse adversaries, but they will cost a lot of CP, which you could just spent to block investigations at two or three sites with much cheaper bluffs.

Also, adversaries like Living Machine and even Abduction, tend to be a little unreliable. If you know your opponent is going to be using computer or alien investigation sites, then they're fine, but otherwise you're gambling on your opponent using that specific skill during the game.

With Adversaries that can use Subterfuge combat cards, Ambush is practically a prerequisite to getting your money's worth. This means, for a lot of them, they're actually slightly more expensive than they look.

The real payoff for Adversaries are the Killer cards. You're looking at spending 24 CP for a single encounter, but Alien Bounty Hunter could potentially, permanently, wax one of your opponent's agents. But, to even play Killer keyworded cards, both players have to have agreed before the game started.
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Ryan-Iver Klann
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Wow, thanks for the info! I'll whip together a couple decks tonight and see how it goes. It's probably best that I streamline the decks to begin with anyway, that way we can learn the game flow before we get crazy with it. After your comment, I read the 'Alien Harvester' card. Seems a bit strange lol, flipping a card from 12 inches up and 12 inches away. We'll just leave that one out...
 
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Michael Schwarz
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Alien Harvester is patterned off a really old Magic The Gathering card... I think Falling Star, but it's been out of print for nearly 20 years now, so I might be misremembering the title.

When the game originally released the mechanic made more sense... or at least, wasn't as weird as it is today.
 
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