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Subject: Yellow victory - romans and scots ruling them all :) rss

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Konwacht
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Yellow had a very good game today. The romans rushed the island - and, what has never been before: They managed not to loose any of their legions in their nation turns battles within the first round, so they could score a lot and get into positions for storming the rest of england in round two. They forced the welsh into submission and encircled the belgae with strong fortified troops. The romans did not try to force them into submission - they simply encircled them and waited for that nasty revolt - while beating the hell out of the welsh and the brigantines in the west. The belgae revolt could brake through and burn the roman fort in Essex, but in round two the romans wiped them from the map and made intense pressure on the brigantines which had to submit. So the romans had everything under control - and could score in round three for scotish areas far up to the east coast of scotland. It was the first time in our games that the romans conquered a territory equal to the historical expansion. They even tried to force the picts under their control, but they had luck to survive with three areas and did not need to submit. Well, the romans had immense luck with their dice - so the invaders in round four and five could not brake the strongholds of the romans in strategic areas - even not with supremacy. We saw three invaders despairing on one roman fort... And that was one significant factor in our game today - yellow had such a luck... I never saw that - beside the unlucky norwegians that got smashed by the danes and normans - romans, scots and dublinors scored so well together in one game session. Because of that the game map often was paved with yellow game markers - the scots kept the back of the dublinors free of norsemen and angles and the dublinors could marsh into York and hold it with strong forces. Sometimes they could make pressure on the saxons, so that the romano-british stayed in the game (and scored one point or another in the scoring rounds). The scot nation profitated from the free back itself and could install a strong nation that resisted all invasions. Together with the norsemen it reamed the caledonians and almost the picts. At some point it looked like red could be the only one to beat yellow in this game because the norsemen and saxons did so well but the welsh and irish fought a "guerilla war" - each round the control over the three important welsh areas changed. And the norsemen got stopped by the scots... The saxons did well but in the end they could not score enough to compensate the irish disappear when the welsh finally won the small war. The reason was that the saxons got strucked hard in the last rounds by the danes and the normans. As normally in our games the normans whiped off the saxons and since the norwegians and danes had themselfes mutually destroyed (several fights between the two nations left behind completely empty areas without any control) they could conquer england easily. And so - surprisingly (it really did not look like this) - red got last... One addional comment: The whole game the four colours were represented in england in such an equal way that never (!) it was possible to score Bethwalda or King (with the exception of round XVI and the normans since no other leader survived the struggle in the middle of england ^.^).

YELLOW = 255

Romans 123
Romano-British 12
Scots 60
Dublinors 30
Norwegians 30

BLUE = 228

Belgae 20
Picts 68
Angles 78
Normans 62

GREEN = 184

Welsh 64
Caledonians 40
Danes 60
Jutes 20

RED = 180

Brigantes 18
Irish 24
Norsemen 50
Saxons 88
 
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Marc Mistiaen
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Hi there.
I will concentrate on the yellow player, since it is the matter at hand.
I posted a session report I won with yellow just a few days ago, you may be interested in a shared experience.
It seems like you are an experienced yellow player, so do you think your strategic choices made you win the game, or was it it this incredible stroke of luck? Or rather, do you think you would still have won the game should you have had an average game, luck-wise?

About the way you handled the Belgea, if I understand you well, you made sure to leave them alone on turn one so that they could not submit. What was your reasoning? If they submit, you get the points for the territories but you can't fight them anymore until they unsubmit, so they can strike you with impunity that turn, that I get. But if you don't attack them at all, then you've won nothing. Of course, you will score the point on turns 2 and 3 when you wipe them out. Still, I'm not sure why you would want them not to submit. Or is it so that you can send the troops elsewhere, i.e. in Wales and northern England?
Has it been a tough task to make the Welsh submit? I understand you were very lucky, but what is your usual experience in fighting the Welsh in the difficult terrain at the frontier with England? Did they submit as soon as they could?

It seems you did quite well with the Dubliners too. I find it really difficult to imagine how you could score thirty points with them. The main problem for me is just simply how few troops they get total. Of course, this is a factor if the Scots could eliminate the Norsemen and the Angles that could have harmed the Dubliners – although I would be concerned by the Danes too, at that point, especially considering they share the York objective with the Dubliners – but I fail to see how the Dubliners can secure a strong presence in York. This is because of population reduction. Indeed, it would be tempting to mass forces on York, but it would mean you haven't left troops on other areas and that you can't support all the troops you have. Remember that the overstacking rule that allows you to have one territory with unlimited armies is different from the one that stipulates you cannot support more troops than twice the number of territories you own at the end of the turn.
In my game, the forces I left on York were as numerous as I could, which was enough to keep the Danes away, but not enough to prevent the Dubliners from being wiped out on the subsequent turns. And this is because I had to leave single units on other areas just so I owned enough to support all my troops. Those areas could then easily be conquered by other players. Matter of factly, I had made the York objective my only goal with the Dubliners, and I was prepared to see them die immediately after. I simply could not see how to save them. True, the Scots could help a little, but not much withtout fear of letting Scotland too weak behind them.
One last thing about the Scots. I scored approximately 75 points with them, and I mainly spent the whole game in Scotland, sitting on my main objectives and leaving the Caledonians alone. You scored 60 and seemed to have done well with them. You also state that you fought the Caledonians with help from the Norsemen. In the end, do you think it was beneficial to you? Did the Norsemen occupied some of the areas the Scots score four points for?

I'm also quite interested to know how the Jutes could score twenty full points, especially considering the Romans could not be broken.
 
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Konwacht
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Corwin1980 wrote:
Hi there.
I will concentrate on the yellow player, since it is the matter at hand.
I posted a session report I won with yellow just a few days ago, you may be interested in a shared experience.
It seems like you are an experienced yellow player, so do you think your strategic choices made you win the game, or was it it this incredible stroke of luck? Or rather, do you think you would still have won the game should you have had an average game, luck-wise?


I play Britannia often and since many years (the new FFG version only since this year) - but I don´t believe I´m a "very experienced" yellow player The strategy which I used this time often works very well, but in "normal" games with less of that luck I received this time the score of especially the romans mainly remains at 90 to 100 points. This time was VERY unusual. With average luck I believe the scoring in scotland would not have been possible - with more losses there would have been the legions missing to conquer parts of scotland and beating up the brigantines.

Corwin1980 wrote:
About the way you handled the Belgea, if I understand you well, you made sure to leave them alone on turn one so that they could not submit. What was your reasoning? If they submit, you get the points for the territories but you can't fight them anymore until they unsubmit, so they can strike you with impunity that turn, that I get. But if you don't attack them at all, then you've won nothing. Of course, you will score the point on turns 2 and 3 when you wipe them out. Still, I'm not sure why you would want them not to submit. Or is it so that you can send the troops elsewhere, i.e. in Wales and northern England?


Right - encircling the belgae made sure they could not brake out and make a lot of damage. With that decision I had enough troops to concentrate on the task of submitting the welsh and beating the brigantines in northern england. When forcing the belgae into submission - what is won? I score for their territories - but they automatically unsubmit in their nation turn. And the romans score for their territories even in round 2 when wiping out the whole nation.

Corwin1980 wrote:
Has it been a tough task to make the Welsh submit? I understand you were very lucky, but what is your usual experience in fighting the Welsh in the difficult terrain at the frontier with England? Did they submit as soon as they could?


Yes, because I forced my troops towards the "normal" terrain while ignoring most of the difficult terrain. The welsh player knew that he needed a good "birth rate" to defend against the later coming irish nation - which got true as you can see from the session report. So I got into short negotiations - he would submit as soon as he could and I would let him get the full "birth rate" for cumulating troops against the irish and later nations which try to land ashore the welsh territories.

Corwin1980 wrote:
It seems you did quite well with the Dubliners too. I find it really difficult to imagine how you could score thirty points with them. The main problem for me is just simply how few troops they get total. Of course, this is a factor if the Scots could eliminate the Norsemen and the Angles that could have harmed the Dubliners – although I would be concerned by the Danes too, at that point, especially considering they share the York objective with the Dubliners – but I fail to see how the Dubliners can secure a strong presence in York.


They got only Ceshire and the territory above and stayed there. You are right - in most of our games the dublinors have not much chance in scoring so high. But this time the scots harmed the norsemen and angles and so only the danes got a danger. But the danes were under pressure by the saxons and other nations, lost three armies short time before against one territory of the saxons - without getting it! - and so the dublinors left their territories and just moved to York - with all of their troops. And four dublinors against two danes... well, the danes could have tried to reconquer the land but they had such a hard stand that they decided in fighting for other territories, so scoring points for sure and not risking armies at three dublinors remaining in York...

Corwin1980 wrote:
This is because of population reduction. Indeed, it would be tempting to mass forces on York, but it would mean you haven't left troops on other areas and that you can't support all the troops you have. Remember that the overstacking rule that allows you to have one territory with unlimited armies is different from the one that stipulates you cannot support more troops than twice the number of territories you own at the end of the turn.


Right, but one army in Ceshire and one in the territory above are enough - when, and that was fact this time, the scots secure your back and the welsh are in hard fights against the irish. The welsh could have wiped away the dublinors, but for Ceshire they score less than their home territories which were under continuating pressure of the irish.

>snip<

Corwin1980 wrote:
One last thing about the Scots. I scored approximately 75 points with them, and I mainly spent the whole game in Scotland, sitting on my main objectives and leaving the Caledonians alone. You scored 60 and seemed to have done well with them. You also state that you fought the Caledonians with help from the Norsemen. In the end, do you think it was beneficial to you? Did the Norsemen occupied some of the areas the Scots score four points for?


Yes - when eliminating the caledonians the three remaining nations of the picts, the scots and the norsemen fought each round about the control of those key-areas. The picts were weak and only hold their three home-territories and so mostly norsemen and scots fought upon the "4" of scots home territory. Both nations profitated at some scoring rounds, at the end the scots had problems to hold those northern areas because some bad luck made the norsemen take this key-territory. But at the end, 60 points for the scots is in our group a good scoring since in most of our games the scots have only a 33% of chance in getting the nation stably. Often enough they are smashed between norsemen and a blue front of picts and angles.

Corwin1980 wrote:
I'm also quite interested to know how the Jutes could score twenty full points, especially considering the Romans could not be broken.


Well, very easy ^.^ - the saxons did nothing to prevent this because the romans made so well they had strong troops manning the coast, so that the saxons concentrated on key-areas which were worth more points for them than Kent. And: In most of our games it is a lot easier to kill the Jutes some rounds later because they only hold Kent and score there - but the saxons and angles conquer much more land and grow a lot faster. So after two rounds or three the Jutes are very weak - you don´t need to fight them first. The saxons score a lot more points for killing romans forts and armies and fighting over Wessex and Sussex than by fighting the Jutes in Kent. And when the Jutes get Kent, kill a roman fort and one legion they score good points too - but since in most of our games green has the hardest chance to win these points are no matter. It is a lot more important for red to score a lot points to get a good start compared with the angles than bashing the Jutes
 
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Marc Mistiaen
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Hey, thanks for taking the time to reply thoroughly. I really look forward to play more games so as to become familiar with the different developments the game can offer.
 
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