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Subject: Exiles - A Nebulous Strategy Guide rss

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Locke Balenska
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I've been meaning to finish this up and post it for a while now. Of all the races, Exiles seem to get the most comments about being not very good overall or very difficult to win with. I happen to love the Exiles and seem to have a really good track record with them, though I chalk that up more to a combination of feng shui, luck, loud distractions and emotional blackmail than any particular skill (this is true of all my wins, regardless of the race I pick). So, below I will discuss my incoherent and tangential thoughts about what makes the Exiles a valid competitor to the space ballet and how you, too, can learn to just stop worrying and love not having starbases.


Chapter 1 - Ewwwwwwww

What are the Exiles? Well they're fish. Except they sort of look like lizards. Or maybe they're lizards, that look like fish? Lish? Fizards? Either way they're pretty gross. No wonder the Seven shunned them.



Chapter 2 - Okay, they're gross, but what are they like in space?

What makes the Exiles good in a game of Eclipse? These are their advantages over other races:

The Wily Chameleon: Starting Tech - Most races start with only 1 tech from the first or second column. Exiles start with a fourth-column tech *and* a rare tech. Awesome. In fact, Exiles have the most expensive starting tech of any race (15 base cost, next highest is Eridani at 12).

Reefing on Coral...wait, what?: Orbital VP - Like many races, they have a racial bonus related to one of their top strengths. The good news is that this one is much less situational than, say, the Magellan (who might by pure luck get very few discoveries in a given game). In order to maximize this bonus, you'll of course want an Orbital in every hex you end the game with. Depending on the size of the game, you can probably hope for around 6 extra VP from this - probably vaguely about the same as Draco or Planta but less than Lyra. A helpful bonus, not enough to carry you to the finish by itself.

The Flopping Fish: Orbitals instead of Starbases - This one is certainly a mixed bag. You can't build starbases. Your orbitals cost 6 materials instead of 5. Orbitals are not very good for battles (they're just okay early on and the lack of initiative will hurt a lot later), and you can't stack them like starbases. But, they give you a population cube slot, they're worth 1 VP, and you can build more than 4 of them. This is the thing that makes Exiles unique, so you absolutely need to use it, but because it is a mixed bag you can't rely on it to do all the heavy VP-lifting. You need to pace yourself with these.


Then the big notable disadvantages compared to other races are...

...wait, nothing?

Pretty much. Your starting colonies are perhaps the closest thing to a disadvantage, in that you only get two starting population cubes, but this is no different from Mechanema, Draco, Orion, Rho Indi or Eridani, and you at least get to choose if one of your cubes will be money or science. Exiles get 9 starting resources, which is exactly median and the same as Mechanema, Draco and Hydra (and better than Lyra, Terran, Rho Indi or Magellan).

Other than that, Exiles is standard - ordinary ship blueprints, 4 hybrid rep/ambassador slots, start with 1 interceptor, the usual amounts of influence discs, colony ships and ambassadors, etc.

So you don't have any HUGE strengths like Lyra, Hydra, Orion, etc do, but you don't really have any weaknesses, either.



Chapter 3 - Swimming with the Current: when should I pick Exiles?

Are you about to play a 2-player game of Eclipse? Or perhaps a 9-player Eclipse? Good, you're done, close this window and go pick some other race.

Okay, that's a bit harsh, but the Exiles' strengths do not lend themselves to especially small (2-3) or large (8-9) games. It's not that they do anything particularly bad in those scenarios, but there are plenty of other races out there who's special characteristics are better suited to small and large games. Every race has their sweet spot. Exiles' natural sweet spot is 6 players - everyone having their one Tier 1 explore and getting all cozy-cozy. 5 players is basically the same as 6 with an empty spot, so still fine (even better if you are next to the gap and can grab a few more hexes away from Tier 1 to put orbitals in later). 4 players is usually fine, too.

7 players is a tough scenario to analyze and I would say that sometimes it is even better than 6 - it might be a little too squishy for Exiles, but on the other hand starting out in Tier 3 can make up for it. We'll come back to this.


Chapter 4 - Uncharted Waters: early actions

Exiles start out like most races - you'll probably want to do a lot of explores first and maybe a research to grab something juicy, like Improved Hull. Usual principles apply. You want some Ancients but not too many, if possible. You want to connect to other players and exchange ambassadors if you think they won't betray and attack you early-on, otherwise you want to wall off from them. Generally, you don't want to turtle entirely nor be too open (this varies of course... if your neighbours are Rho Indi and Orion total-turtling may be a very good idea).

Exiles, though, make the best use of materials early-on than anyone else since they start with orbitals. Materials planets are most common in Tier 3. So, while you may still want to explore a couple Tier 1/2 hexes for science/money planets and to ensure they are oriented how you want them, most of your explores should actually be in Tier 3. As usual, if you get an empty hex with a discovery grab it and tactically bankrupt yourself to get the disc back. Try to get as much materials as you can, but in the early few rounds you will have many 1-planet hexes and it is hard to afford a lot of them.

Exploring a lot in Tier 3 also gives you a good chance of finding a Supernova or Pulsar, if you are playing with them, which are great for Exiles - with two starting tech it is fairly easy to stay ahead of the Supernova's explosion chances for at least a little while, and the Pulsar gives you a planet while letting you build a quick Cruiser or Orbital for 'free' when you only have 5 or 6 resources (every second round, of course).

In 7+ player games where you start in Tier 3, this same strategy generally applies, but I'll further add that you don't even need to bother trying to reach Tier 1. Go ahead and let yourself get cut off - you don't usually care about the center and it makes it that much harder for other players except your immediate neighbours to reach you if people start to realize you are doing well. This is dangerous if everyone else also does lots of Tier 3 exploring though - there are not a ton of Tier 3 hexes and they can run out quickly, leaving you with too small of an empire. For that reason, exploring multiple Tier 2 hexes early may be beneficial.



Chapter 5 - The Path of the Komodo versus the Path of the Clam: spending your materials

The biggest mistake players commonly make the first time they play Exiles is that they immediately start building more orbitals.

It makes intuitive sense, right? You start with orbital tech, your orbitals help defend the territory you just explored, the earlier you build and colonize those orbitals the more resources you'll get out of them, and they give you more VP... what's wrong with that? You're the orbital fishards, of course you're going to build orbitals!

The problem is that orbitals are not very good tactically or in battle. They're costly, stationary, can only be deployed one-per-hex, and have lacklustre blueprints (especially the lack of initiative and starting computer). They'll probably be enough to intimidate a Terran or Hydra player - at first - but those players will just go grab discoveries and better hexes from Ancients, then come back to stomp your orbitals later. Orion, Eridani or Rho Indi players won't even blink at an Exile orbital or two.

On the other hand, spending all your materials on dreadnaughts or cruisers to ensure your military capabilities defeats the point of playing Exiles altogether - might as well have just picked Terran and grabbed Cloaking Device if it came up, right? At least then you'd have starbases!

So like most races, the first things you want to spend your materials on is ships, especially if you explored ancient hexes with good planets underneath. Like most races, you want to stomp the nearby Ancients quickly and grab the delicious discoveries, reputation, hex VP and planets before anyone else can (or even if you explored them in such a way as to block other players from reaching them you still want their economic boosts early).

You can go with either Dreadnaughts or Cruisers, whatever works best for you. If you do go with Dreadnaughts, you will either want to grab Fusion Drive so they are mobile enough to defend your whole space (whereas with 4 Cruisers you can spread them out more) or you will want to turtle a bit more so there are fewer entrances to your empire to worry about. Rounding out your materials purchases with orbitals is an optimal strategy - if you have 11 materials buying a cruiser and an early orbital is a great boost for your economy (if you can get by with just the one cruiser).



Chapter 6 - Mimicing the Mimic Octopus: the grand strategy of being everything at once and spraying clouds of ink in space

The Exiles are not a military powerhouse. They are also not a turtle race. They are also not prime researchers, diplomats or explorers. Their ships cannot go toe-to-toe with the Orion, they only have 4 reputation slots, they can't plop down a bunch of starbases in a single choke-point hex, they start with a terrible choice of +2 money or +2 research, meaning at least half the time you're only getting +2 research for the first few rounds or have even less money for exploring.

The Exiles are a jack of all trades, masters of fucking up your plans.

(That is, other players' plans, not you who is playing them.)

Every bit of the Exiles either make them an unappealing target for your opponents, or let you adapt yourself to counter whatever strategy your opponents are pursuing. If your opponents all focus on their money income to try and out-action each other, you have the tools to deploy tons of orbitals with money cubes on them. If your opponents are fighting a lot instead of researching, you can put all your orbitals towards research and become a science powerhouse. If your opponent is saving up a huge virtual fleet, maybe a bit of both is the best path - get just enough research to obtain Advanced Robotics/Advanced Economy/Quantum Grid and a few good military techs, put the rest of the orbitals into money, then wait until he runs out of actions and use Cloaking Device to make guerilla strikes on hexes he can't defend without bankrupting himself. At the start of the game, everyone wants Improved Hull right? Exiles have just enough science with their Cloaking Device discount to grab it first.

When it comes to players attacking you, your orbitals won't necessarily give you that much clout in battle, but they will still pin. Trying to run a fleet of ships through border defenses to attack more valuable hexes inside an enemy empire is a strategy that falls apart handily against Exiles.

This also leads to the infamous Sea-Pig Standoff: a few Exile ships are sitting on a border hex. A giant fleet moves in to fight them. The Exile player sees that [s]he won't likely win, so instead uses Cloaking Device to move a couple of those ships into the now-undefended hex(es) the fleet just came from (or deeper, into even more valuable hexes). The big fleet is still pinned by the weak Exile defenders (no doubt the cheapest of the Exile ships, sacrifical prawns and all) and cannot move back. At best, the giant-fleet-owning player gains one hex but loses another, breaking even.

The Sea-Pig Standoff is hardly ever actually used... or at least it rarely needs to be used more than once. Once your opponent realizes the cost of attacking Exiles, they'll often choose to fight more profitable ventures elsewhere.

This explains how the Exiles might thwart their enemies, but how do they actually gain VP to win at the end? As said above, they must do a bit of everything. You'll need to find a few 2- or 3-VP hexes. Try to fill at least one tech track, preferably two. Keep a few discoveries for VP. Fight enough to get a few 3- or 4-VP rep tiles. Save some resources for a few monoliths or Developments in the last couple rounds. The half a dozen VP or so from your orbitals will be the icing on the cake.

You cannot win with Exiles by only doing one or two things, the way Hydra can win by focusing on research and a bit of late-game combat, the way Orion can win by conquering everything around the GC, or the way Lyra can win by hiding and continuously spending resources on infrastructure. Exiles win like Terrans win, with the sum of their parts.



Chapter 7 - Follow the Cuttlefish: putting it all into practice

I'll do a quick, vague walkthrough of the most recent game I played as Exiles. Obviously it's all situational and your own game will never go quite the same, but hopefully it gives an idea of the pace of the game.

It was a 4-player game. The other players were Draco, Orion and Hydra.

Things started off as usual - lots of exploration, Orion pumping out a second cruiser and attacking ancients Draco couldn't get to very quickly, Hydra gobbling up all the cheap techs, Draco spreading around Tier 1 and the Exiles grabbing empty discoveries in Tier 3. By the end of round 3 I had my homeworld, another Tier 2 hex, and three Tier 3 hexes that I could just barely afford to keep influenced (with 2 more empty ones I took discoveries from and left). I had waited until Tier 3 to build 2 cruisers at once for better action efficiency and used them to grab an Ancient hex with a money and science planet.

The Tier 3 explores soon ran out, but I got a Pulsar at the end of them, and I took a second Ancient hex with the cruisers. It was a double Ancient, but with Improved Hull I managed to take it with 3 cruisers. I had 11 materials at the time, so I built my first orbital at the same time as the third cruiser, putting it in the other Tier 2 hex since it bordered a Tier 1 hex owned by Hydra. Still feeling the bite of a not a ton of money/science just yet, so I was a bit action-constrained, but the Pulsar helped with that.

By the end of round 5, I had built 2 more orbitals, researched some more tech (especially bottom row - Nanorobots, Advanced Robotics, Fusion Drive) and had consolidated my space - cruisers were on the front lines, upgraded, and I didn't need to tactically bankrupt every round or two anymore thanks to the money from the orbitals. Money was in the black, and materials were through the roof now (I had had 5 materials planets {including the grey ones} for 3 straight rounds now). Science was still not competitive compared to Hydra or Draco, but I had plans to fix that soon!

Round 6, I grabbed Advanced Labs and sent the cruisers at a Tier 1 owned by Draco (plus an Ancient) since Draco was getting hit by Orion on the other side.

By Round 8, I had 7 hexes and 7 orbitals. Using Artifact Key, I put Plasma Missiles on my Orbitals to help them deter Hydra who had nearly finished upgrading her Dreadnaughts into something very nasty. She had Distortion Shield but her Dreadnaughts only had 3 HP each, so I just went with 6 missiles per orbital and no computers (usually you'd want to toss a Positron or Gluon on there, otherwise). With cruisers and interceptors just waiting to pin her and then rush past the Dreadnaughts into her homeworld and other valuable hexes, she built some starbases for defense and wisely attacked Orion instead.

Round 9 came about. I sent the cruiser/interceptors to attack Hydra anyways - they died but I got a 3-VP rep to replace my last 1-VP tile, so not a total loss. Draco attacked two of my hexes but only succeeded on the 1-VP one. I finished the bottom track with monoliths and built 4.

Final score for the Exiles was:

Hexes: 10
Tech: 9
Rep: 9
Ambassadors: 1
Monoliths: 12
Orbitals: 6
Total: 47

If I'd succeeded in bombing the Hydra hexes, it would have been a landslide victory. As it was, I still just barely edged out the Hydra player, who ended with 45 after taking the GC from Orion (typical Orion not squashing Hydra early like they should!).


Chapter 8 - The last Caviar Caveat

Hopefully, this has encouraged some players to give Exiles a[nother] try if they weren't enthusiastic about them previously. Certainly they are not for everyone - you need to enjoy having a bit of a slow start and perhaps less interaction with other players than many other races. But for those of us who enjoy the mixed playstyle and sedate pace of Exile life, swimming the fishard lanes of space can be rewarding indeed.
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Starkiller
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Thanks for doing this! It was needed!

Very good & informative.thumbsup
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Paul Olson
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So first off, I think your guide is awesome. I love playing as the Exiles for many of the reasons you mentioned. In fact, behind Hydran, they are the race I pick in competitive games most often. This is mostly due to starting tech (which is great in combination) which as you pointed out, is the most any race starts with science cost wise (15). I agree with most of your points and strategy mentioned except for a few ideas/thoughts I wanted to bring up:

1. 2-3 player games: I think the Exiles are a great choice. Why? Because you can focus on orbitals without worry of anyone coming hard after them. In bigger games, you paint a target on your back by building a lot of orbitals right away. In a smaller game (especially 2 players), due to the limited # of players, you are already a target in general no matter what race you pick. I have played a lot of 2 player games (20 something at this point) and have picked the Exiles 4 or 5 times and won handily each time picking them. Part of this is in a smaller game, star bases aren't quite as important because you don't have the extra player variable to worry about (a player betraying you for example) and it's easier to abandon hexes that aren't as good in tier 3 for better ones in tier 1. The Exiles have a great snowball like quality that I would say is almost easier to get rolling in smaller games. I will agree that in larger games (7-9 players), I would avoid picking this race.

2. Early actions: Dread it up. In the above guide, you mention dreads or cruisers will do ship wise. I agree that one of the first priorities in any game playing as the Exiles would be to get a fleet going, but I would argue that your resources are better spent on getting 1 dread instead of cruisers. This is for a couple of reasons. First, materials are precious to the Exiles. Because orbitals are a must in the long run, you can't afford to lose any ships (or at least early on) because Orbitals are expensive. Cruisers can be great, but they have a higher chance of being lost to ancients in battle (again, especially early on). Dreads can be bulked up and with the absence of star bases, you'll need the extra fire power in the late game (this is especially helpful if you are in an initiative battle late game). This might mean you have to wait until round 3 to build said dread, but usually I say the wait is worth it in the end. From that point on, you can focus on Orbitals and when the time comes, build a second dread.

3. Tech to focus on: Neutron Bombs, Drives, and Computers. I'll start with what I would avoid. You mentioned improved hull is a good one to pick up early. I would disagree. Yes, improved hull seems like a logical choice and can help your fleet survive Ancient battles early on. However, I like to look at what tech I can put on my orbitals that would benefit defense. The Orbitals only have three upgrade slots with one built in hull. Typically, you always want an even number of hull spots on your ship design when defending. This means only one of the three slots on your Orbitals needs the improved hull upgrade tile to be most beneficial in the long run (1 built in hull, 1 hull in one slot, and 2 hull from the improved hull slot = 4 hull). And that means you can't have computers if you want to be the most efficient. Rather, a better option would be the Conifold Hull and a computer in combo with the duel ion cannon ship part on your orbital or simply a computer or two with missiles due to the lack of initiative. Orbitals are only meant to pin unless they have missiles. I hope that makes sense as I fear I wasn't clear enough. Main point being, I would avoid the improved hull tech unless there isn't any other better option. What tech should you focus on? Neutron Bombs is a must. Cloaking in combination with Neutron Bombs makes you a constant threat of picking up high VP systems deep in enemy territory. To travel that deep into territory, better drives are a must. If you pick up the ancient drive ship part, look out opponents, however, picking up either of the researchable drives are great choices. Sometimes the best defense is a good enough offense which is all you need to start snowballing. Lastly, computers are a must. They give precious initiative to your orbitals as well as make the need for improved hull not as needed for your other ships. A Dread with enough computers to only need a 2 or better when fighting an ancient is just as deadly as a Dread with improved hull if not more so.

I hope all of that made sense, and thank you, Locke Balenska, for starting this thread. I agree with Starkiller that it was needed.
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Locke Balenska
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Some very good points, Dymond, thanks!


Good reasoning for the Exiles in 2-3 player games. I think it depends on your opponent a lot, though. Any race that can make especially good use of the Tier 1 hexes like Hydra or Draco is going to have even more of a leg up to start than you, so I worry about them or powerhouses like Orion/Rho Indi simply dominating the middle of the map and being able to crush the Exiles before they can get enough Orbitals built to catch up. In order to focus on getting materials to build those Orbitals, you have to focus on Tier 3 hexes rather than the middle, so the other player gets at least 3, if not 4 or 5 Tier 1 hexes for their economy and research very early on. I haven't played as many small games as Exiles as I'd like though, so I'll have to get some more tries in and see how they fare for myself.


re: Dread vs Cruisers - most of the time I would lean towards Dread, too, but I didn't want to make an absolute statement. There could be times when 2 Cruisers is preferable.

ie: if the only Ancients you can attack is a double Ancient that one Dread won't beat but two Cruisers will

or, if you have the technology to beat a single Ancient Ship with just one cruiser, and want to attack two of them in the same round (pretty rare scenario, but especially with cloaking device letting you attack a second Ancient beyond the first, it's plausible)


Improved Hull is not great for your Orbitals in mid-to-late game, no, but my point was more that it can be grabbed in round 1, and since it is often in high demand its not uncommon for several Improved Hulls to be available round 1, all researched and no more appear until late in the game. If you're Terran, tough luck you won't get it, but Exiles can.

It is possible an enemy player might try to grab a hex off of you with just an interceptor or so, early in the game, when they still have Ion Cannons. An Orbital with Ion Turret and 2 Improved Hulls, for 6 HP total, can often be a valid defense against such a move, and then hurrah you've got an orbital built early that will help your economy/science a lot, rather than building a Cruiser to defend instead.

That's probably not all that common, though. More often I think the Improved Hull is just useful for your Interceptor/Cruiser(s)/Dreadnaught against the Ancients early on. Or, you might want to grab it round 1 just so the Orion next door can't get it.

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Tuomas H
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Thank you for the effort you put in writing this guide. I'd like to add a few things to the discussion.

In my 95+ games of eclipse I've found the exiles to be the hardest race to win with, and this is why:

1) starting technologies and 2sci-resource are ill-suited to early combat
2) bad luck with hex-draws can comparatively often break the game, I think
3) a lousy starbase with a high cost, few slots for parts, and ESPECIALLY the 1-per-hex-limit are together the bane of the exiles
4) in order to use the race advantage, exiles must build orbitals, but that makes the fleet weaker and hexes more lucrative to the enemies

--

You face a crucial choice even before the game begins. Cube on money or science? Usually actions are so important, particularly in the early game, that I'd pick money, but if sentient hull is available, I might pick science and pass first to get 5sci by round 2. It depends: bombs? gauss shield? neighbors? planta in game? Ambassadors can help the exiles with the combo of resources and added security.

The "sea-pig" strategy in the OP is a fine last option on defense, provided that you have neutron bombs. If your fleet is losing, you can move your strongest ship (or, if enemy is pinned & has no materials, the weakest) to a valuable enemy hex, essentially making a trade. The problem afterwards is that you have likely lost ships before they could retreat, and your empire is probably divided at this point, and you may have also lost the investment on the orbital until you retake the lost hex. On offense the same strategy works with similar problems / rewards.

An important clarification to your guide; exiles can afford improved hull with starting resources ONLY by exchanging 3 money + 3 materials for 2 sci. Don't do it. Some of the best early technology choices, in my opinion:
1) neutron bombs to make your enemies think twice about attacking
2) gauss shield to beat single ancients
3) imp.hull / sentient hull on round 2

The most common start I've tried to work with is as follows:
1) EXP a mat planet on tier 3 to get 8 materials by round 2
2) EXP a single ancient (choose the hex-tier with best odds for a desirable hex)
3) RES a tech or UPG hull to dreadnaught + interceptor
4) Round 2: UPG & BUI & MOV to the single ancient with your dreadnaught & interceptor

Exploring several tier 3 hexes during early game and massing orbitals on them later is also a fine choice if you find enough planets, but tiers 1&2 have more valuable hexes - they can't be given away. If you can get through the early game without dropping behind in production, there is a good chance for a solid, profitable game. In the late game your cloak can really shine, but your defence will likely be complicated.

TL;DR
It's tricky, what can I say?
Hope for good t3-hexes & peaceful neighbors.
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skir wrote:
Then the big notable disadvantages compared to other races are...

...wait, nothing?

Pretty much. Your starting colonies are perhaps the closest thing to a disadvantage, in that you only get two starting population cubes, but this is no different from Mechanema, Draco, Orion, Rho Indi or Eridani, and you at least get to choose if one of your cubes will be money or science. Exiles get 9 starting resources, which is exactly median and the same as Mechanema, Draco and Hydra (and better than Lyra, Terran, Rho Indi or Magellan).

Other than that, Exiles is standard - ordinary ship blueprints, 4 hybrid rep/ambassador slots, start with 1 interceptor, the usual amounts of influence discs, colony ships and ambassadors, etc.


I disagree. Their starbases are terrible. This VERY MUCH matters.

Their starbases have high cost, a total of 3 slots, and Most importantly, they are limited to 1 per hex. This is brutal.

This race needs to defend their hexes (orbital points), and they, of all of the races, have nearly the hardest time doing so.

Their starting advanced tech requires them to be aggressive. They have a very weird balance of powers.

Our experience is, and I have 50+ games, is that Exiles are the hardest to win with, even harder than Eridani. We haven't played Pyxis enough yet, but they seem tough to win with as well.
 
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Krister Dahlgren
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ghbell wrote:


I disagree. Their starbases are terrible. This VERY MUCH matters.


Orbitals ARE NOT starbases. Treating orbitals as a 1:1 substitute to starbases is the biggest mistake most players seem to do with the Exiles.
 
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Correct. Exiles having no starbases is a reason they are brutal to play.
 
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