Recommend
24 
 Thumb up
 Hide
14 Posts

Warriors of God» Forums » Sessions

Subject: Replay of "The Lion in Winter" rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: WoG [+] [View All]
Adam Starkweather
United States
New York City
New York
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Welcome to a replay of one of the scenarios in Warriors of God. This is crossposted from Consimworld.

This is just the start - I will be updating this with more play as time goes on. Please come back and see what happens. Happy to answer any questions on mechanics as well.

So sit back and read on. I will be doing an explanation of mechanics and a game replay to show how the game works - please feel free to ask any questions you might have.

This scenario covers the period from 1135 - 1258 and is a bit more wide open than the 100 Years War.

Let's meet the cast of characters first. Starting for the Blue Team (the French), sporting blue counter colors is da current King of the Frenchies, Louis VII.

From the net, a little info:

A member of the Capetian Dynasty, Louis VII was born in 1120, the second son of Louis VI of France and Adélaide of Maurienne (c. 1100–1154). Construction began on Notre-Dame de Paris in Paris during his reign. As a younger son, Louis VII had been raised to follow the ecclesiastical path. He unexpectedly became the heir to the throne of France after the accidental death of his older brother, Philip, in 1131. A well-learned and exceptionally devout man, Louis VII was better suited for life as a priest than that of a monarch.



Next up for the French Team is Stephen of Blois.

A little background on ole Steve:

Stephen was born at Blois in France, the son of Stephen, Count of Blois, and Adela (daughter of William the Conqueror). His brothers were Count Theobald II of Champagne and Henry of Blois, bishop of Winchester. Stephen was sent to be reared at the English court of his uncle, King Henry I, in 1106. He became Count of Mortain in about 1115, and married Matilda, daughter of the Count of Boulogne, in about 1125, who shortly after became Countess of Boulogne. Stephen became joint ruler in 1128. In 1150 he ceased to co-rule, and in 1151, the County was given to his son, Eustace IV. When Eustace died childless, Stephen's next living son, William inherited the territory.



And starting for the red team, wearing a smart red counter (that needs a little brush up later), is Geoffrey V d'Anjou.

A little background on Jeff (he was a busy guy):

Geoffrey V (August 24, 1113 – September 7, 1151), Count of Anjou and Maine, and later Duke of Normandy, called Le Bel ("The Fair") or "Geoffrey Plantagenet", was the father of King Henry II of England, and thus the forefather of the Plantagenet dynasty of English kings.

Geoffrey was the eldest son of Fulk, Count of Anjou and King-Consort of Jerusalem. Geoffrey's mother was Eremburge of La Flèche, heiress of Maine. Geoffrey received his nickname for the sprig of broom (= genêt plant, in French) he wore in his hat as a badge.

King Henry I of England, having heard good reports on Geoffrey's talents and prowess, sent his royal legates to Anjou to negotiate a marriage between Geoffrey and his own daughter, Matilda. Consent was obtained from both parties, and the fifteen-year-old Geoffrey was knighted in Rouen by King Henry in preparation for the wedding. Interestingly, there was no opposition to the marriage from the Church, despite the fact that Geoffrey's sister was widow of Matilda's brother (only son of King Henry) which fact had been used to annul the marriage of another of Geoffrey's sister to the Norman pretender William Clito.

During Pentecost 1127, Geoffrey married Empress Matilda, the daughter and heiress of King Henry I of England, by his first wife, Edith of Scotland and widow of Henry V, Holy Roman Emperor. The marriage was meant to seal a peace between England/Normandy and Anjou. She was eleven years older than Geoffrey, very proud of her status as an Empress (as opposed to being a mere Countess). Their marriage was a stormy one with frequent long separations, but she bore him three sons and survived him.

The year after the marriage Geoffrey's father left for Jerusalem (where he was to become king), leaving Geoffrey behind as count of Anjou. John of Marmoutier describes Geoffrey as handsome, red-headed, jovial, and a great warrior; however, Ralph of Diceto alleges that his charm concealed his cold and selfish character. When King Henry I died in 1135, Matilda at once entered Normandy to claim her inheritance. The border districts submitted to her, but England chose her cousin Stephen of Blois for its king, and Normandy soon followed suit.

The following year, Geoffrey gave Ambrieres, Gorron, and Chatilon-sur-Colmont to Juhel de Mayenne, on condition that he help obtain the inheritance of Geoffrey's wife. In 1139 Matilda landed in England with 140 knights, where she was besieged at Arundel Castle by King Stephen. In the "Anarchy" which ensued, Stephen was captured at Lincoln in February, 1141, and imprisoned at Bristol. A legatine council of the English church held at Winchester in April 1141 declared Stephen deposed and proclaimed Matilda "Lady of the English". Stephen was subsequently released from prison and had himself recrowned on the anniversary of his first coronation.



Also, in the English corner is Matilda of Normandy. Don't let her good looks fool you, she is a tiger...

A little background:

On the death of her father in 1135, Matilda expected to succeed to the throne of England, but her cousin, Stephen of Blois, usurped the throne, breaking an oath he had previously made to defend her rights. The civil war which followed was bitter and prolonged, with neither side gaining the ascendancy for long, but it was not until 1139 that Matilda could command the military strength necessary to challenge Stephen within his own realm, including battles at Beverston Castle and other sites. Stephen's wife was another Matilda: Matilda of Boulogne, Countess of Boulogne. During the war, Matilda's most loyal and capable supporter was her half-brother, Robert of Gloucester.

Matilda's greatest triumph came in April 1141, when her forces defeated and captured King Stephen, who was made a prisoner and effectively deposed. Although she now controlled the kingdom, Matilda never styled herself queen but took the title "Lady of the English". Her advantage lasted only a few months. By November, Stephen was free, and a year later, the tables were turned when Matilda was besieged at Oxford but escaped to Wallingford, supposedly by fleeing across the snow-covered land in a white cape.

In 1141 she had escaped Devizes in a similarly clever manner, by disgusing herself as a corpse and being carried out for burial. In 1147, Matilda was finally forced to return to France, following the death of Robert of Gloucester, her half-brother and strongest supporter.



The neutrals at scenario start can go to either side (the French chooses one, the English get the other). David I below is sporting his English colors here. In this scenario, the Neutrals are a bit more powerful then in the 100 Years War scenario. Makes for a very different feel to the game.

First up is one of those troublesome Scots - David I. A little background:

King David I (or Dabíd mac Maíl Choluim; also known as Saint David I or David I "the Saint") (1084 – May 24, 1153), was King of Scotland from 1124 until his death, and the youngest son of Malcolm Canmore and of Saint Margaret (sister of Edgar Ætheling). He married Matilda, daughter and heiress of Waltheof, Earl of Northumbria, in 1113 and thus gained possession of the earldom of Huntingdon.

On the death of King Edgar in 1107, the territories of the Scottish crown were divided in accordance with the terms of his will between his two brothers, Alexander and David. Alexander, together with the crown, received Scotland north of the Rivers Forth and Clyde, David the southern district with the title of Earl of Cumberland. The death of Alexander in 1124 gave David possession of the whole starting on 27 April of that year.

In 1127, in the character of an English baron, he swore fealty to Matilda as heiress to her father Henry I, and when the usurper Stephen ousted her in 1135 David vindicated her cause in arms and invaded the Kingdom of England. But Stephen marched north with a great army, whereupon David made peace. The peace, however, was not kept. After threatening an invasion in 1137, David marched into England in 1138, but sustained a minor defeat on Cutton Moor in the engagement known as the Battle of the Standard.

He returned to Carlisle, and soon afterwards concluded peace. In 1141 he joined Matilda in London and accompanied her to Winchester, but after a narrow escape from capture he returned to Scotland. Henceforth he remained in his own kingdom and devoted himself to its political and ecclesiastical reorganisation. A devoted son of the church, he founded five bishoprics and many monasteries. In secular politics he energetically forwarded the process of feudalisation and anglicisation which his immediate predecessors had initiated. He died at Carlisle. David I is recognised by the Roman Catholic Church as a Saint, although he was never formally canonized.

He had two sons, Malcolm (not to be confused with Malcolm IV of Scotland, this Malcolm's nephew) and Henry and two daughters, Claricia and Hodierna.



Last up, the final leader in play for this game is neutral Robert of Gloucester. Looking dashing in his chosen French attire.

A little background on the Robster:

Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester (c. 1090 – October 31, 1147) was an illegitimate son of Henry I of England, and one of the dominant figures of the English Anarchy period. He was also known as Robert de Caen Count of Meulan "the Consul" and as Robert "the Consul" de Caen.

Robert was probably the eldest of Henry's many illegitimate children. He was born at Caen in Normandy before his father's accession to the English throne. His mother is not known for certain, though recent scholarship suggests she was a member of the Gay family, minor nobility in Oxfordshire. William of Malmesbury refers to Robert's "Norman, Flemish, and French" ancestry, but this may be a reference only to his father's side of the family. Robert was acknowledged at birth, and raised at his father's court. He had a reputation of being an educated man, not altogether surprising considering his father's scholarly inclinations. He was a patron of William of Malmesbury and Geoffrey of Monmouth and of the continuing building program of Tewkesbury Abbey in Gloucestershire initiated by his father-in-law, which resulted in one of the finest surviving Norman structures.

In 1119, Robert fought at the Battle of Bremule; he was already one of King Henry's foremost military captains. In 1122, he was created Earl of Gloucester. At his father's death, in the struggle between the Empress Matilda and Stephen for the English throne, he at first declared for Stephen, but subsequently left Stephen's service and was loyal to Matilda, his half-sister, until his death.

According to the Gesta Stephani:
"Among others came Robert, Earl of Gloucester, son of King Henry, but a bastard, a man of proved talent and admirable wisdom. When he was advised, as the story went, to claim the throne on his father's death, deterred by sounder advice he by no means assented, saying it was fairer to yield it to his sister's son (the future Henry II of England), than presumptuously to arrogate it to himself."


At the Battle of Lincoln, he captured Stephen, whom he imprisoned in the custody of his wife, Mabel. This advantage was lost, however, when Robert fell into the hands of Stephen's partisans at Winchester, covering Matilda's escape from a failed siege. Robert was so important to Matilda's cause that she released Stephen to regain Robert's services. In 1142 she sent Robert to convince her husband Geoffrey of Anjou to join her cause. Geoffrey refused to go to England until he conquered Normandy, so Robert stayed in France to help him until he learned of Matilda being besieged at Oxford. He hastened back to England, along with Matilda's young son Henry. In 1144 one of Robert's own sons, Philip, declared for Stephen and so Robert found himself and his son on opposite sides. Robert fought tirelessly on Matilda's behalf until his death in 1147 from a fever at Bristol. One of his illegitimate sons was Richard, Bishop of Bayeux (died 1142).



4 
 Thumb up
1.00
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Adam Starkweather
United States
New York City
New York
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The area in play is the same map as in the 100 Years War game.

Here is where the duel will take place:

2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Adam Starkweather
United States
New York City
New York
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
First up, which side gets which neutral? Just a dice off and the winner picks which he wants. French win and choose Robert (no civil war in England on the very first turn as both leaders start in England). The English get the leftovers and have David I on their side (Scots and English? What is next? Cats and dogs living together? Republicans are gonna hate that!)

Now, to the game:

The first thing done in a game turn is to decide who has the initiative. Having the initiative means getting an extra move and getting to go both first and last in the turn - but - the other player will get to pick the neutrals for next turn. Sort of a built in catch up mechanism.

Each player rolls a 6 sider and possibly applies one modifier to the roll - if he doesn't currently have a King on the board (a 3 star leader), he subtracts one from his roll. In this replay, the Brits rolled a 2 and the French rolled a 1. If you look at the pics above, you won't see a 3 star leader for the English, so they get a -1 on the roll.

So the roll is 1 to 1. On the first turn, ties are determined by special rule (later, the reigning initiative player wins the ties). Here, the special rules tells us that the English win ties. They get the initiative on turn one.

To determine how many impulses each side gets, add two to the losing die roll and that is how many the initiative player gets - the loser gets one less.

So, we set an English Initiative marker on the 3 space and the French initiative marker on the 2 space. The English will move first and last on this turn.



All done - play is about to start. Come on back and see what happens tomorrow.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Adam Starkweather
United States
New York City
New York
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Back to the replay....

The first turn of these games is usually a pretty quick affair. The game revolves around controlling areas and you never start with anything under control.

To control a province, you need to have a leader there. If it is his home province (you can tell from the badge on the leader matching the badge on the province) - it is usually automatic. Only if you have mercenaries with you does it become dicey.

If it isn't the leader's home province, he/she can try and convert it to his camp. To do so requires rolling equal to or less than the Leader's rank (1-3 stars).

The English have David I in his home province and Geoffrey V in his home province - so they stay put. The English hope that they are left alone and convert the province over after all movement.

Matilda is in Normandy but her home is in England. Unfortunately, England is full of French right now. She stays put hoping to roll a 2 or less to convert Normandy. So, the English pass on their first impulse. They will probably continue to pass unless something opens up.

The French have two leaders in England and both are from England - since it is automatic, having two there does nothing extra. The French move to Wales with Stephen of Bois. They leave Robert in England as he is the better combat leader and should prevent Matilda from doing anything.

And 2 minutes later, that's where it ends up.

Next up, leaders determine control. Most are in their home province and that converts automatically. The French King, Louis VII, converts Ile de France over to the French. England goes French as well (grumbling heard from the English crowd)....

Stephen attempts to convert Wales over and makes the roll. Wales is French.

The English get Scotland and Anjou (leaders at home) and tries to convert Normandy with Matilda - failing the roll.

So:
France has England, Wales and Ile de France
England has Scotland and Anjou.

Next up is troop recruitment. Provinces are worth 1,2 or 3 - and you get that number of troops. Some special troops can come in as well. Wales has Archers - they join up with Stephen. A band of Knights join up with Louis (Knights can only be recruited in Ile de France or England - and must be under the King). Scattered troops appear in the other provinces.

Here is how we stand after recruitment. By the grace of Brent, the VASSAL master, the controlled provinces change color for control (just so you know, the paper version does not change color for control).



Next up is to see what happens to your leaders - do they live or die? You always get 3 a turn but how long they stick around is the variable. This is dependent on how long they have lived in the game - here all pass and none go the way of the buffalo.

The new breed of leaders enter now and are placed. But first, let's meet our new friends.

Henry II makes his appearance and the English have a King!

Henry's info:

He was born on 5 March 1133 at Le Mans to the Empress Matilda and her second husband, Geoffrey the Fair, Count of Anjou. Brought up in Anjou, he visited England in 1149 to help his mother in her disputed claim to the English throne.

He married Eleanor of Aquitaine on 18 May 1152, but from May to August he was occupied in fighting Eleanor's ex-husband Louis VII of France and his allies. In August Henry rushed back to her, and they spent several months together. Around the end of November 1152 they parted: Henry went to spend some weeks with his mother and then sailed for England, arriving on 6 January 1153.

Some historians believe that the couple's first child, William, Count of Poitiers, was born in 1153. Henry's succession was established by the Treaty of Wallingford in 1153, after he had challenged Stephen's forces at Wallingford Castle. It was agreed that Henry would become king on Stephen's death.



Also showing up for the English is Thomas Beckett (I think Henry and Thomas will have some words down the road)...

A little on Thomas (Thomas was a busy guy):

Thomas Becket, the son of a wealthy Norman merchant living in London, was born in 1118. After being educated in England, France and Italy, he joined the staff of Theobald, the Archbishop of Canterbury.

When Henry II became king in 1154, he asked Archbishop Theobald for advice on choosing his government ministers. On the suggestion of Theobald, Henry appointed Thomas Becket as his chancellor. Becket's job was an important one as it involved the distribution of royal charters, writs and letters. The king and Becket soon became close friends. Becket carried out many tasks for Henry II including leading the English army into battle.

When Theobald died in 1162, Henry chose Becket as his next Archbishop of Canterbury. The decision angered many leading churchmen. They pointed out that Becket had never been a priest, had a reputation as a cruel military commander and was very materialistic (Becket loved expensive food, wine and clothes). They also feared that as Becket was a close friend of Henry II, he would not be an independent leader of the church.

After being appointed Thomas Becket began to show a concern for the poor. Every morning thirteen poor people were brought to his home. After washing their feet Becket served them a meal. He also gave each one of them four silver pennies.

Instead of wearing expensive clothes, Becket now wore a simple monastic habit. As a penance (punishment for previous sins) he slept on a cold stone floor, wore a tight-fitting hairshirt that was infested with fleas and was scourged (whipped) daily by his monks.

Thomas Becket soon came into conflict with Roger of Clare. Becket argued that some of the manors in Kent should come under the control of the Archbishop of Canterbury. Roger disagreed and refused to give up this land. Becket sent a messenger to see Roger with a letter asking for a meeting. Roger responded by forcing the messenger to eat the letter.

In 1163, after a long spell in France, Henry arrived back in England. Henry was told that, while he had been away, there had been a dramatic increase in serious crime. The king's officials claimed that over a hundred murderers had escaped their proper punishment because they had claimed their right to be tried in church courts.

Those that had sought the privilege of a trial in a Church court were not exclusively clergymen. Any man who had been trained by the church could choose to be tried by a church court. Even clerks who had been taught to read and write by the Church but had not gone on to become priests had a right to a Church court trial. This was to an offender's advantage, as church courts could not impose punishments that involved violence such as execution or mutilation. There were several examples of clergy found guilty of murder or robbery who only received "spiritual" punishments, such as suspension from office or banishment from the altar.

The king decided that clergymen found guilty of serious crimes should be handed over to his courts. At first, the Archbishop agreed with Henry on this issue but after talking to other church leaders Becket changed his mind. Henry was furious when Becket began to assert that the church should retain control of punishing its own clergy. The king believed that Becket had betrayed him and was determined to obtain revenge.

In 1164, the Archbishop of Canterbury was involved in a dispute over land. Henry ordered Becket to appear before his courts. When Becket refused, the king confiscated his property. Henry also claimed that Becket had stolen £300 from government funds when he had been Chancellor. Becket denied the charge but, so that the matter could be settled quickly, he offered to repay the money. Henry refused to accept Becket's offer and insisted that the Archbishop should stand trial. When Henry mentioned other charges, including treason, Becket decided to run away to France.

Under the protection of Henry's old enemy. King Louis VII, Becket organised a propaganda campaign against Henry. As Becket was supported by the pope, Henry feared that he would be excommunicated (expelled from the Christian Church).

Becket eventually agreed to return to England. However, as soon as he arrived on English soil, he excommunicated (expelled from the Christian Church) the Archbishop of York and other leading churchmen who had supported Henry while he was away. Henry, who was in Normandy at the time, was furious when he heard the news and supposedly shouted out: "Will no one rid me of this turbulent priest?" Four of Henry's knights, Hugh de Morville, William de Tracy, Reginald Fitz Urse, and Richard Ie Bret, who heard Henry's angry outburst decided to travel to England to see Becket. On the way to Canterbury the four knights stopped at Bletchingley Castle to see Roger of Clare.

When the knights arrived at Canterbury Cathedral on 29th December 1170, they demanded that Becket pardon the men he had excommunicated. When Becket refused, they hacked him to death with their swords.

The Christian world was shocked by Becket's murder. The pope canonised Becket and he became a symbol of Christian resistance to the power of the monarchy. His shrine at Canterbury became the most important place in the country for pilgrims to visit.

Although Henry admitted that his comments had led to the death of Becket, he argued that he had neither commanded nor wished the man's death. In 1172 Pope Alexander III accepted these arguments and absolved Henry from Becket's murder. In return. Henry had to provide 200 men for a crusade to the Holy Land and had to agree to being whipped by eighty monks. Most importantly of all. Henry agreed to drop his plans to have criminal clerics tried in his courts.



Next up is a boo boo I think...the Comte de Toulouse. Here shown as Roger III - but I think we have an error. Well, that's why we do this...I need to do some research here (probablyt a Japanese to English thing)...

Here is the likely dead counter walking...Charles might know...(Charles did - he suggested Raymond V).



The French also get Procureur de Poitou, Giraud de Verley...need to do some research on this guy as well...



The French, as the side without the initiative get to choose which neutral - they grab Eleanor...

Now this chick I have heard a lot about (although my ex dug her for some reason - so it is a bit bitter...).

Info on Eleanor (another busy one):

The oldest of three children, Eleanor's father was William X, Duke of Aquitaine, and her mother was Aenor de Châtellerault, the daughter of Aimeric I, Vicomte of Chatellerault. William's and Aenor's marriage had been arranged by his father, William IX of Aquitaine the Troubador, and her mother, Dangereuse, William IX's long-time mistress. Eleanor was named after her mother and called Aliénor, which means the other Aenor in the langue d'oc (Occitan language), but it became Eléanor in the northern Oil language.

She was raised in one of Europe's most cultured courts, the birthplace of courtly love. By all accounts, Eleanor was the apple of her father's eye, who made sure she had the best education possible: she could read, speak Latin, and was well-versed in music and literature. She also enjoyed riding, hawking, and hunting. Eleanor was very outgoing and stubborn. She was regarded as very beautiful during her time; most likely she was red-haired and brown-eyed as her father and grandfather were. She became heiress to Aquitaine (the largest and richest of the provinces in what would become modern France) and seven other countries. Her brother, William Aigret, died when he was 3, along with their mother, and she had only one other sibling, a younger sister named Petronilla.

Marriage to Louis VII of France

King Louis VII of France, Eleanor's first husband William X died on Good Friday, April 9, 1137 while on a pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela in northwestern Spain. Eleanor, about the age of 15, became the Duchess of Aquitaine, and thus the most eligible heiress in Europe.

As these were the days when kidnapping an heiress was seen as a viable option for attaining title, William wrote a will on the very day he died, bequeathing his domains to Eleanor and appointing King Louis VI, nicknamed 'the Fat' her guardian. He made his friends promise to approach the king and ask him to arrange a marriage between his son and Eleanor without delay.

Louis agreed to the request. Louis sent his son Louis VII with an escort of 500 knights and arranged for Abbot Suger and other lords to accompany him. Louis arrived in Bordeaux on 11 July, and the next day, accompanied by the Archbishop of Bordeaux, who had come on Eleanor's behalf, the couple was married in the cathedral of Saint-André in Bordeaux.

It was a magnificent ceremony with almost a thousand guests. However, there was a catch: the land would remain independent of France, and Eleanor's oldest son would be both King of France and Duke of Aquitaine. Thus, her holdings would not be merged with France until the next generation. She gave Louis a wedding present that is still in existence, a rock crystal vase on display at the Louvre.

Something of a free spirit, Eleanor was not popular with the staid northerners (according to sources, Louis's mother, Adélaide de Maurienne, thought her flighty and a bad influence). Her conduct was repeatedly criticized by Church elders (particularly Bernard of Clairvaux and Abbot Suger) as indecorous. The King, however, was madly in love with his beautiful and worldly bride, and granted her every whim, even though her behavior baffled and vexed him to no end. Much money went into building grand apartments just for Eleanor's sake.

Though Louis was a pious man he soon came into violent conflict with Pope Innocent II. The archbishopric of Bourges became vacant, and the king supported as candidate the chancellor Cadurc, against the pope's nominee Pierre de la Chatre, swearing upon relics that so long as he lived Pierre should never enter Bourges. This brought the interdict upon the king's lands.

Louis became involved in a war with Theobald II of Champagne, by permitting Raoul I of Vermandois and seneschal of France, to repudiate his wife, Theobald's niece, and to marry Petronilla of Aquitaine, Eleanor's sister. Eleanor urged Louis to support her sister's illegitimate marriage to Raoul of Vermandois. Champagne also sided with the pope in the dispute over Bourges.

The war lasted two years (1142–44) and ended with the occupation of Champagne by the royal army. Louis was personally involved in the assault and burning of the town of Vitry. More than a thousand people who had sought refuge in the church died in the flames. Overcome with guilt, Louis declared on Christmas Day 1145 at Bourges his intention of going on a crusade.

Eleanor and Louis took up the cross during a sermon preached by Bernard of Clairvaux. She was followed by some of her royal ladies in waiting as well as 300 non-noble vassals. She insisted on taking part in the Crusades as the feudal leader of the soldiers from her duchy. The story that she and her ladies dressed as Amazons is disputed by serious historians. However, her testimonial launch of the Second Crusade from Vézelay, the rumored location of Mary Magdalene's burial, dramatically emphasized the role of women in the campaign.

The Crusade itself achieved little. Louis was a weak and ineffectual military leader with no concept of maintaining troop discipline or morale, or of making informed and logical tactical decisions. In eastern Europe the French army was at times hindered by Manuel I Comnenus, the Byzantine Emperor, who feared that it would jeopardize the tenuous safety of his empire. However, during their three-week stay at Constantinople, Louis was fêted and Eleanor was much admired. She is compared with Penthesilea, mythical queen of the Amazons, by the Greek historian Nicetas Choniates; he adds that she gained the epithet chrysopous (golden-foot) from the cloth-of-gold that decorated and fringed her robe. Louis and Eleanor stayed in the Philopation palace, just outside the city walls.

Beyond Byzantine territory, a particularly poor decision to camp one night in a lush valley surrounded by tall peaks in hostile territory led to an attack by the Turks, who slaughtered as many as 7000 Crusaders. As this decision was made by Eleanor's vassal, Geoffrey the Fair, Count of Anjou (with whom it was rumored that she had an affair), many believed that it was her directive. This did nothing for her popularity in Christendom. Eleanor's reputation was further sullied by her supposed affair with her uncle Raymond of Poitiers, Prince of Antioch.

While in the eastern Mediterranean, Eleanor learned about maritime conventions developing there, which were the beginnings of what would become admiralty law. She introduced those conventions in her own lands, on the island of Oleron in 1160 and later in England as well. She was also instrumental in developing trade agreements with Constantinople and ports of trade in the Holy Lands. She is credited with bringing opium from the Middle East to Europe[citation needed].

So many deeds - just one counter:



And they English get the left overs - Geoffrey VI (I bet he was related to Geoffrey V).



The leaders are placed on the map. You can either put the leader on one of your controlled spaces or in his/her home province (home province is nice because he/she gets troops automatically - but sometimes this is bad to start a battle immediately at the start of the next turn).

The French place first - and put Giraud in his home of Poitou (the French know that Eleanor will be there later as well). Nice power base starting up.

The Compte de Toulouse goes in his home of Languedoc (way down to the south - near Toulouse I bet).

Eleanor joins Giraud in her home province (you think maybe? Nah...they are just good friends). The English, have a King now and he goes in his home of Normandy and joins Matlida. Thomas Beckett's home is England but England doesn't look too friendly with all those French mulling about - he joins Geoffrey V and VI in Anjou.

Power blocs are forming...

Here is the end of turn:



Last thing is to check the victory points - you get 2 for each 3 area - not too many of these but Ile de France and England are two of them - those plus Wales (most all others are 1 VP) nets the French 5. The English get 2 (for Anjou and Scotland) - net them and the victory track is at 3 (French).

English better get cracking...

BTW, takes less than 5 minutes to play this out - takes a little longer to type it all.

Whew
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Adam Starkweather
United States
New York City
New York
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Back to the replay...and the second turn...

I wish I could relate all the depth here - tons of choices, dilemmas, weighing of the benefits and disadvantages with all the possible moves. I always feel like I just don't know what is best to do when I play Warriors of God. So simple - but the mind starts running into overdrive. Such a simple game - but so hard to play well...sounds like a shill I know - but I just don't know how else to say it.

I will give it a shot - but if you don't follow or want to know more, please just ask...

OK, as you saw in the final positions, France is spread out and England in more concentrated. If France moves, they will expose themselves some where. They are a bit trapped here.

First is the initiative check (France prays - she can't do much but doesn't want England to have an extra move)...rolls are England 2, France 5...both have Kings now so the final roll is not modified. Loser of the roll plus 2 is how many impulses the winner has. The loser has one less. So France gets 4 impulses, the English 3 - and the English choose which incoming neutral they want.

The soon to be placed neutrals are going to play a key role in what the French can do. A crappy leader that is from Wales and an excellent leader from England. They have leaders and troops in both but have to wait it out. Concentrate in England, and Wales goes to the English (Wales has archers - which are very nice).

The French move first and move Eleanor from Poitou to Acquitaine. Just a province grab - Acquitaine is a "3" province and very valuable. France knows this will be a tough turn and this is an attempt to recoup. Eleanor moves instead of Geraud because they are equal as military leaders (at least at the current troop levels) and Eleanor, as a two star, has double the chance of converting Acquitaine over to the French camp.

A moment to talk about movement. You can move 3 leaders to an adjoining space if they are connected by river (blue border), 2 leaders over land (white border), 1 leader over a mountain (red border). Also, if you control both sides of a sea connection, you can move 2 leaders via sea...if not, 1 leader via sea.

England needs to consider this.

First thing England does is move Thomas Beckett and 1 SP into Poitou. This freezes the French leader there and forces battle. Beckett is the best leader on the board now (when fighting with small numbers of troops) and England likes this match up.

France can move Eleanor back to make the odds a little better, but they are still not great - and the reward of controlling Acquitaine remain - France passes.

England, with her backdoor now closed, moves the 2 remaining leaders from Anjou to Normandy - England now has 4 leaders there - and one impulse left.

France looks at the board and sees no way out of what will happen next. She passes again and braces...

England, now with a blue border to move across, moves 3 leaders into Ile de France. The King stays behind. Not an easy decision as the King is the best leader...but also the King is from Normandy and will automatically convert it...if things go badly, England needs to keep the game within reach and get some victory points.

France - still trying to cover too much - passes. And it is over for impulses on turn 2.

I have no idea if I am playing this well or not (a very odd experience for me) but there you have it.

Movement in a graphic:



Now for an example of combat - the battle for Ile de France...

Louis VII (with 5 troops and 1 Chevalier) takes on 3 English Leaders (each with 2 troops)...

First off, who is commanding? In every battle, both sides need to chose a champion. Has to be the leader with the highest number of stars (if equal, the owner chooses).

French are easy - one leader. The British can pick any of the 3. Now, to the combat ratings...

First number at the bottom is bravery. The higher the better. The second number is the command ability - how many rolls in combat that side gets. So it is between Matilda who is a "1" bravery but gives 5 rolls...or Geoffrey V - "2" bravery but only 3 rolls. Britain goes with Geoffrey and his "2".

Bucket o' dice here.

Louis will have 5 dice to roll (his command ability) and hits on "6"s (his is the lower of the two commander's bravery).

Geoffrey will have 3 dice to roll (his command ability) and hits on "5"s or "6"s.

Each side has more troops then they can fire until losses kick in.

Notice if Henry had come along - Henry would get 7 rolls and also hit on "5"s and "6"s...

The Chevalier is nice - he takes two hits to kill.

Goes in simultaneous rounds of fire - if someone retreats, you get a free shot as they turn tail. Offering siege can also happen - if we get to that...

Graphic at the start of rolling...



Round one:
English (6,4,2) - one kill - but the Chevalier takes the one hit and it ends up as a no effect.
French (6,4,6,4,1,1) - two kills - Matilda and Geoffrey VI now command 1 troop point.

Round two:
English: (1,2,3) - miss
French: (3,1,3,2,6,6) - two kills - Matilda down to no troops (but she can still fire - each leader has troops with her). Geoffrey VI loses his troops as well.

English are losing now and have to consider retreating.

Round three:
English (6,5,5) - finally - 3 hits. Kills the Chevalier and one troop..Louis down to 4 under command
French (1,2,3,1,1,1) - miss

Round four:
Now can go either way - English with the upper hand but can't lose any more troops...

English: (4,3,5) - one kill - Louis with 3 under command. (and now can only roll 4 dice - fewer troops then command rating). French - needing one more hit (2,5,1,6,3) - get it...kills one...and all of the English Leaders are without troops (meaning kills now kill leaders)...bad thing..

The English retreat back to Normandy (gives the French a free shot) and France rolls (2,3,1,4) - miss.

It is settled...Henry sees his buds running back to him and frowns.

Situation after the battle:

2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Adam Starkweather
United States
New York City
New York
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Finishing out the turn after combat...

First control is decided. The English King Henry is in his home province of Normandy and automatically gains control (worth 2). Far to the south, the Comte de Toulouse is from Languedoc (worth 1) and that converts over to the French. So victory point gain by the French will be reduced this turn but France still has more.

Recruiting is next and players place new troops in controlled areas. These are grabbed immediately by local leaders. If, because of rank, some troops can't be led, they are left in the province to await new leaders appearing.

Next, the "death check". Who dies from illness. This was a tough turn on the leaders in NW Europe. 4 French leaders die and 3 English. Both Kings survive however but power vacuums are everywhere. This is strongly exploited by the English. They start a Civil War in England (well, they place leaders there - forcing combat next turn) and have a decisive advantage in the upcoming combat phase. Also, Acquitaine is left without any leaders at all - leaving that province wide open - and the English are closer.

It will be a tough turn for the French coming up.

Victory Points are +3 more for the French.

Here is the situation at the end of the turn:



Going to just the highlights...

On turn three, the French won the initiative again (on a tie) but also on a 6...this means lots of movement this turn.

The French couldn't hold England in a battle (outnumbered badly in command and in size) and pray for a successful siege attempt and make sure to hold what she has. The English go strong in England and move to into a land grab in the south.

The combat phase sees only the Battle for England. France offers siege and fails - both Robert and Clifford are captured and held in the Tower of London.

The English gain England and the French gain Champagne. Leaders go and come...

The English get VPs for England, Normandy, Anjou and Scotland. The French gain for Ile de France, Champagne, Wales and Laguadoc. Even so far...net is zero.

The English also gain VPs for holding two leaders in prison (the French could offer trading a province for them but decide to hope for that famous poor treatment in ENglish jails to do them in). Unfortunately, they get breakfast in bed every morning and survive the turn in prison. This nets the English 3 more VPs (you get for each star on the leader).

Turn ends with the French having 3 VPs now.

Situation at the end of turn 3:

2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Paul M
United States
Elkhart
Indiana
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Nice session report. The game looks great. I'm not one for preordering, but this may change my mind.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jim Ruddy
Canada
Hamilton
Ontario
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Hey! You people who haven't pre-ordered yet! For the love of God, get off the fence and preorder this game! MMP has the best pre-order system in the entire wargaming world. Check them out! Just do it! You're still reading this? What are you some kind of goof or somefink? Order the darned game already!
cry
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tomàs Reixach Coll

Girona
Girona
msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Wow!
After reading this session report the only thing that I can do is pre-order this fabulous game.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Peter Young
United States
Yakima
Washington
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Looking good, Adam. I'd go and pre-order, but I've already done so. Looking forward to this.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mike Wall
United Kingdom
Ormskirk
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Superb AAR. So much detail.

But can I check the following
In combat the English score one hit and you comment,
"but the Chevalier takes the one hit and it ends up as a no effect."

the rules say "A knight or chevalier can absorb upto 2 battle hits, but it is still removed if it takes only one battle hit; so try not to watse them."

So shouldn't the chevalier have been eliminated?


 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Adam Starkweather
United States
New York City
New York
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Almost two year old replay - rules change as the game is developed. No one should treat this as a rules guide.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mike Wall
United Kingdom
Ormskirk
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Many thanks. Hadn't noticed how old the replay was. Loved the historical detail that's really added to the enjoyment of my solo games to get used to the system.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Nomadic Gamer
United States
Illinois
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Hmm. How conservative.
My first solo game the English won by turn 6-ish. Well, ok, I was too
demoralized as the French.
In my 2nd solo game, with at least 4 impulses, Geoffrey of Anjou can and did force Louis to battle. Poor Louis was captured. I reset and His Majesty ran to England where all the leaders met. And this time he just died when the French lost. England seemed to get the upper hand,
even with missing control rolls.
My point is:
Geoffrey has twice the chance to defeat Louis,so as the French, I would NOT recommend holding Paris, as His Majesty needs more than 1 die.
Louis should run away to raise troops.
Yes, I know, find a live opponent.
I was/am intrigued by the system.
Good work. meeple
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.