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Subject: Interception by army to prevent two armies from converging rss

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Situation:

Napoleon is being attacked by two armies through use of a major campaign card. Army A is adjacent to Napoleon and Army B is two spaces away.

Can Army A move first and move into Napoleon's space preventing Napoleon from intercepting Army B before it converges with Army A making a much larger and powerful force. Or can Napoleon intercept Army B with a part of his army despite it is already in a space with Army A?

Historically, this is how Napoleon fought and beat several allies by destroying one army and dealing with another before they could combine together.

I can not see any examples in the rules or here dealing with this situation... So maybe it obvious to some but just want to understand clearly.

I appreciate any feedback.

 
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Brad Miller
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Each army moving must complete its move, and thus be intercepted, before the next army can move.
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Windopaene wrote:
Each army moving must complete its move, and thus be intercepted, before the next army can move.


Ok, so Napoleon can intercept Army B with all or only part of his army because Army A has already moved into his spot?
 
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Renaud Verlaque
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CM Randall wrote:
Situation:

Napoleon is being attacked by two armies through use of a major campaign card. Army A is adjacent to Napoleon and Army B is two spaces away.

Can Army A move first and move into Napoleon's space preventing Napoleon from intercepting Army B before it converges with Army A making a much larger and powerful force. Or can Napoleon intercept Army B with a part of his army despite it is already in a space with Army A?

Historically, this is how Napoleon fought and beat several allies by destroying one army and dealing with another before they could combine together.

I can not see any examples in the rules or here dealing with this situation... So maybe it obvious to some but just want to understand clearly.

I appreciate any feedback.



Interesting situation. Design-wise, that's the kind of situation that the Interior Lines card is meant to address: fight and, hopefully, defeat each enemy army separately.

Now if you don't have the IL card just at this moment, what can you do? Can you still intercept Army B? You essentially can, but you need to withdraw first.

If your army is engaged by Army A, none of it can't withdraw in front of Army B (12.5.4) and by extension none of it can intercept, so what you need to do is to withdraw part of your army from Army A before you know what Army B is doing (bonus: it does not even cost you a card). Place the withdrawing detachment in the path of Army B and defend against its possible attack or, if memory serves right, you can place the withdrawing detachment in a position to intercept Army B (at the cost of one card only if it intercepts) if Army B does not attack your detachment but attempts to go around it to attack your original army.





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Renaud Verlaque wrote:
CM Randall wrote:
Situation:

Napoleon is being attacked by two armies through use of a major campaign card. Army A is adjacent to Napoleon and Army B is two spaces away.

Can Army A move first and move into Napoleon's space preventing Napoleon from intercepting Army B before it converges with Army A making a much larger and powerful force. Or can Napoleon intercept Army B with a part of his army despite it is already in a space with Army A?

Historically, this is how Napoleon fought and beat several allies by destroying one army and dealing with another before they could combine together.

I can not see any examples in the rules or here dealing with this situation... So maybe it obvious to some but just want to understand clearly.

I appreciate any feedback.



Interesting situation. Design-wise, that's the kind of situation that the Interior Lines card is meant to address: fight and, hopefully, defeat each enemy army separately.

Now if you don't have the IL card just at this moment, what can you do? Can you still intercept Army B? You essentially can, but you need to withdraw first.

If your army is engaged by Army A, none of it can't withdraw in front of Army B (12.5.4) and by extension none of it can intercept, so what you need to do is to withdraw part of your army from Army A before you know what Army B is doing (bonus: it does not even cost you a card). Place the withdrawing detachment in the path of Army B and defend against its possible attack or, if memory serves right, you can place the withdrawing detachment in a position to intercept Army B (at the cost of one card only if it intercepts) if Army B does not attack your detachment but attempts to go around it to attack your original army.



Thank you for the response. To summarize, a part of Napoleon's army must withdraw so has to put it in a spot so it can intercept Army B, when it moves. In the end, all forces will battle but it will be two battles instead of one large one. I'm assuming two smaller battles create less of a risk strategically then one large battle...? Pure conjecture...

Regardless, I truly appreciate your active support of your game design. It is a testament of your customer service.
 
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Renaud Verlaque
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Do note that there is a chance that Army B will not attack your detachment because the latter has to withdraw from Army A before knowing where B is headed and, less likely but possible, that Army B might be able to avoid interception by your detachment.
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