David Dockter
United States
Minnesota
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb



1st Mn President Emeritus breaks out the winter kit for a frickin cold Twin Cities Jan nite ... Gordo's AAR here: G.A.A.R. -- 1/9/15 -- Snapshots of A Night (or) It's Cold Outside, Get Your Tushy Inside and Game


1st Mn plunges whole hog into Next War Taiwan on a FRICKIN cold Jan 9th in god's country...bottom left to right...Ivan, Frick, Alsen, Dr

First Minnesota Historical Wargame Society jumped into Next War Taiwan Jan 9th. 4 of us. 160 years of wargaming experience in the hobby. Of course, we tried the big scenario - Tactical Surprise (always good to jump into a cold pool when it is frickin below zero outside) - advanced rules - optionals - the whole, frickin kitchen sink. A club mate asked, "Why are you guys starting with the big scenario and the advanced rules?". Alsen quickly answered, "Because, if you don't, GMT sends you a one word email: Pussy."

Crackin' it open...


Setup - Tac Surprise scenario - game map


Setup - Tac Surprise scenario - sea zone map


Rich counters: this is good.

So, three of us had it delivered this week. Nice package (map, counters, rule set - no compliants). A few weeks ago we got the bug for modern hypothetical conflicts. We had revisited The Third World War series: The Day Before: 1st MN Bootcamps Third World War Series: The Persian Gulf AAR: Nov 14, 2014 and had plans for a 2015 campaign of Herman's SPI detergent box The Next War ...and then this arrived.

Alsen and I had talked about playing Next War: Korea , but held off until the 2nd in the series arrived (the rules to Korea seemed a little "dense" to us). I ripped off the wrap when Taiwan arrived Tuesday, inhaled (closest thing we get to spring until late March - the smell of a crisp spanking new wargame) and read the rules. I didn't throw up or fall asleep (both typical responses to rule reading).

I posted on the regular First Minnesota Historical Wargame Society "I WANT TO PLAY THIS WEEK" thread and stopped by the club on Friday. I had roped my great gaming mates Alsen and Frick into playing. I arrived at 5ish and started punching counters. We cracked open the setup and let out a groan...we couldn't understand how to set up the scenario...argh.... Luckily, about that time, a gentleman by the name of Ivan stumbled by.

Ivan indicated he had solo'd Next War: Korea . We asked him, "What are you doing?". "I'm just popping by for a quick look." He was promptly ordered to sit down and take command of Communist China (PRC). He complied. Things were looking up. It still took us an hour to set up. What would be really cool is a an 11x17 sheet that shows set up for one scenario (ex: Tac Surprise)- all the pieces on all the displays/maps.

A beef against modern war wargames (biases I brought to this particular party)...

Generally, I hate modern war wargames. Why?

1. Tempo/mismatched scales

VERY difficult to get the tempo correct given modern weapons/capabilities.

2. Politics

The political dynamics often ignored and thus the conflict takes place in some vacuum.

3. Lack of Integration

Good air, naval, land op/strat games are very, very rare; they barely occupy all the fingers on one hand.

4. Ignore command/friction of war

I'm always stunned when I come across a modern war wargame that appears it was designed in a closet for the last two decades: no initiative, no activation roll, no response by the enemy. Most seem to use the outdated and dead IGYG (I Go You Go) model from 5 decades ago: you move all your pieces and some stupid enemy unit gets surrounded yet again.

5. They don't model modern war, but rather WW2 with cooler toys

Most of the modern war wargames I've seen don't seem to play like the conflicts we've witnessed in the last decade or so. No hybrid war. No little green men. No crackin of strategic will.

6. They don't produce good storyline

I suppose it's a lack of characters; since most don't include personalities, factions or something to give a rip about. The games just feel clinical.

BUT....there are three "modern war" wargames I do like:

The Korean War , Empire of the Sun , The Third World War . Why?

1. Integration

EotS top of the heap on this account: incredibly well integrated.

2. Politics

All three tackle this in a particularly whip smart way: The Third World War with the faction cards in the Persian Gulf module, EotS with inter service rivalry, The Korean War with numerous mechanics.

3. Logistics

The 30 year old The Korean War (TKW) is the top of heap. I don't really want to be a staff officer (OCS) when I play a wargame, but TKW gets it just right.

It's not like my 3 modern war wargame favorites don't have blemishes. Both The Korean War and The Third World War rely on old IGYG models with no ability of enemy units to respond. No commanders/HQs. Little friction of war. Empire of the Sun addresses most of these concerns which is why I think it is state of the art. Hope to see other designers steal its concepts sooner than later.

A bit about The Next War: Taiwan...

There is a good game in this box. Things I liked:

1. "Bergish" combat tables

Modifiers; tons of them. All good - stuff the player can impact.

2. The Third World War airwar mechanics

Very similar with the exception of the detection sub-mechanic (see below).



3. The International Posture mechanic

Like it. Essentially, the game begins with rolling dice to determine the orientation (dove, moderate, hawk) of the USA admin, mil and "popular vote". But, it ends there. I wish the mechanic was MUCH more developed and that the postures then evolved or not depending upon game play, random events and what not.

4. Land, sea, air integration

Fairly decent, which makes it a VERY rare wargame.

5. Choices for the player

I love strat/op level games. I felt the players faced strategic decisions and then could try to operationally implement their decisions: another sign of a meaty wargame design.





6. Sub systems like special ops, etc

The special ops are handled very well. Choose one of many missions. Roll a die. Determine success or failure. Conclude by rolling to see if the special op unit is eliminated. Quick and clean.

7. Unit efficiency ratings

Think morale ratings. Essentially unit quality that comes into play at various points in the game. A nice simple mechanic.

8. Optional Units/Rules

Some good ones & blessed chrome. Essentially, each side decides what they want and pays the victory point cost for the choices.


Standard Air Game

9. Standard Air Game

We didn't try the standard air game (of course, we jumped right into the Advanced Air rules), but it looks pretty smart. Will give that a try.

10. We groked it after one long play session

At the end of our play session, all said, "I get it.". Impressive, given its complexity (I'd rate a hair under 3.8 {BGG game weight} - due to the MANY mechanics and not the complexity of each).

A few things I didn't like...

1. Detection and getting wrist fatigue

The detection of strikes needs to be abstracted. We'll use a house rule in the future. Call it the stink hole rule. When you roll to determine success of a strike, if you hit the last pip of success, roll again to determine if the strike still succeeds or not (a function of current SAM and Detection levels...and intrinsic AAA capabilities) - and what possible negative effects happen to the striking asset. This would SIGNIFICANTLY cut down on the bazillion die rolls required for detection/SAM/AAA on game turn 1.

For example, assume you are using the Cruise Naval 2 Strike column. On a "4", the result is a "1 strike" (5 is a miss - hence a "4" is the stink hole). If you toss a "4", roll again to determine negative effects (or not) on the initiator of the strike. I'll post the house rule when we get it past the quarter baked status. Or, we'll just quit whining and play with the detection mechanic as written and develop really strong wrists for chopping wood and what not.

2. No political/random events mechanic so that intervention level evolves

I won't harp much on this point since I understand a political/random events module is in the works. None-the-less, game developments should impact intervention levels (would better reflect evolving nature of strategic will of this conflict).

3. Victory Points not adjusted based on intervention levels

Unless we missed it, there is no adjustment for victory points whether USA is in hole hog or sitting this one out. That would seem to be a fairly big oversight. Easily corrected as play of the game evolves.

4. Lack of setup playaid

Easily addressed. Just a simple 11x17 sheet with ALL the units on ALL the displays. We spent an hour bitchin & moanin trying to figure out how to set it up. (note: I finally went to the Taiwan vassal module - which is very good)

5. IGYG - and you can't respond

The design is what it is. Consequently, I can't criticize a design for such a fundamental choice (IGYG - I go, you go and, you can't respond to anything I do - that damm chess mechanic that gave birth to the hobby), but I'm surprised whenever I seen this basic design mechanic resurface hobby. I was hoping that Herman's card driven wargames genre (ex: We the People ) had killed it - or Berg's chit activation (ex: Carthage: The First Punic War) had, but, this 5 decade old basic wargame mechanic hasn't died quite yet. Despite this, the mechanic doesn't stop the show with Taiwan. Just think of the design as having a retro engine driving it.

After we finally got the game set up (need that set up playaid!), Team PRC began its assault.


General informational display; lots of small mechanics to track - but all good and add to the game play

Bootcamp...


Why yes, you need more than one frickin copy of a rulebook when playing a somewhat complex game for the first time

We rolled to determine International Posture for the USA and Japan (we had selected the Tactical Surprise scenario). Each of the USA factions (administration, military, popular vote) all were "doves" (damm isolationist had been elected prez, the military had been cut to the bone and the peaceniks were running wild) so we ended up at Japan and USA at level 1 (Supplies, Intel and Special OPs only) {note: I think for some reason we played with Japan at level 2 - a mistake}. Poor Taiwan was going to have to go it alone unless the PRC (Peoples' Republic of China) decided to do something aggressive vs Japan, Vietnam, Phil, etc.

Next step was for the PRC to launch a few of their 40 cruise missile strikes. Ivan, PRC assets commander, commented, "We need a plan" at that point. While the PRC went into planning mode, we Allied commanders read the rulebooks again.

After the session, we did discuss basic PRC invasion strategy. We settled on wanting to see an invasion that lops off the Taipei peninsula initially: either thru a full on attack from both coasts plus para/air mob support or primarily a lunge at Taipei with a diversionary attack to pin ROC forces elsewhere.

ROC (Republic of China) get three divisions initially; one each centered on the ends of the island and one in the middle. They lack anything decent (high efficiency and/or powerful units). And, they lack enough units to cover the landing sites. Given that this was a boot camp, we didn't have the chance to discover whether or not the Allies receive an iron fist via reinforcements to drive the PRC back into the sea.

Anyways, the PRC had their plan after a few minutes of discussion. First, the PRC tossed cruise missiles at 7 airfields and 3 ports. Lots of 1 strike results (a 2 strike destroys an installation - if airfield, you lose a air unit step). At that point, we determined that one rulebook wasn't going to work. I made a mad dash to Kinkos to make 3 additional copies. Stopped at Mac & Dons for a drive thru bite. Disgusting. One benefit of the next world war will be to destroy any trace of the golden arches.




It's got enough modifiers to make Richard Berg proud: Frick indicating the net count was a minus four, hence the wrist point down

We then proceeded to conduct special ops. The PRC concentrated on the allied Detection and SAM assets (a good decision). The effect of this was to lower both to a "5" (10 pt scale). Given that both are FREQUENTLY utilized in the game, I can see the worth of devoting significant special ops to those missions.


Air war display: really like the air rules in Taiwan

Next up was air superiority determination. Each side allocates, secretly, units to air superiority. The Allies had about 5 or 6 capable units (after automatic reductions for the scenario, airfield losses, etc), the PRC 2x to 3x that. What each side is going for is Air Supremacy (which means automatic detection of enemy units EVERYWHERE and the ability to strike those exposed units). The Allies need to decide if they want to risk their meager turn 1 assets to prevent the PRC from achieving supremacy. It is likely that if the Allies take that risk they will suffer SIGNIFICANT losses. We (the Allies) decided to pass and save our air units for Turn 2.

As previously stated, the air op mechanic seems to come from The Third World War . Essentially, after an air unit flies a mission, it is moved to the flown box. From there, it needs to make a die roll to then move to the ready box. USA gets a BIG advantage (our mechanics rule!) over the PRC in this respect. Air combat is fairly standard (match them up - fire using a differential table with mods). After resolving air superiority, air units can fly a bundle of various strike/support missions (and each one may be detected - if so, here comes the SAM and AAA).


Final commie prep strikes. Now, where to invade?

We then reached the point in Turn 1 where the PRC decides to invade. They picked the Northwest coast to Taipei. Before the invasion was launched, we re-read the rules. It turned out there are only a few places to invade (light shaded sea hexes) and that there must be NO enemy naval units in the "inshore" box. We checked the sea zone display and two lonely ROC naval units (one with a strike marker) were present. We backtracked and allowed the PRC to fire 3 cruise missiles at each. One ROC naval unit was destroyed, but one somehow survived thus preventing an initial PRC landing in the 1st Movement Phase. {note to self: allocate enough cruise missile strikes to wipe out the ROC naval forces to enable a 1st Movement Phase invasion}

We had another round of cruise missile strikes. At the end of it 4 airbases and 1 port were destroyed. An HQ and a unit had a strike point each. 14 (out of 40) PRC cruise missiles remained. Time for some land action.


First commies appear


Reinforcing with paratroops/airmobile


Trying to form a stable beachhead

PRC dropped 6 units (paratroopers and airmobile) on the island. Alsen asked, "Do we get detection/SAM/AAA against that sh*t?". PRC Asset Commander Ivan responded, "Yes, just as god intended". MANY more die rolls. After detection/SAM/AAA, 4 PRC units had survived to form a thin red beachhead.

We finally got around to some ground combat CRTs after 5 hours (pointed that out to our First Minnesota Historical Wargame Society mates and that got a good belly laugh or two - "5 hours to get to a CRT roll? You guys are nuts."). The PRC hit an allied unit and did a step (hit it from 3 sides with modifiers and rolled very well).

During the Allied combat phase, we got a 6-1+ odds on one PRC paratrooper. Hit it in a surround-a-sound attack (3+ sides). With modifiers. The attack ended up occurring on the maximum column on the CRT (always a good thing). Totally booooooofed the roll (Commander Alsen receives credit) . 2nd to worst possible roll. Result? Allies suffered a hit, no damage to PRC (the defender) and the PRC were ready to land and reinforce their now secure beachhead. Don't recall that ever happening on the most extreme column on a CRT in a game. We collectively shrugged our heads wondering how the CRT will play out.

At that point, after a very enjoyable session of gaming by tackling a brand spanking new meaty wargame from the Class of 2015, we decided we had learned enough for the day. We packed it in for our Taiwan bootcamp. If we would have been younger, we would have pushed thru for another 4 to 8 hours - since we all had gotten the bug for the game (a good sign).

Instead, we then spent a few minutes with our new gaming mate Ivan trading war stories regarding CSW/Monster Con, The Next War, his solo play of Vietnam 1965-1975 , OCS, It Never Snows, quite a few other legendary beasts of the hobby and promises to play them all again. A good session of gaming on a frickin cold JAN Minnesota nite...and a mad dash to cars, the frickin initial five minutes ice box session in those vehicles, the slow enjoyable warm up on the drive home and the scheming for the next session of Taiwan.

Final Thoughts...

Taiwan passes the initial hurdle; four cranky grognards with 160 years experience (full hairy gaming arses) want to play the damm thing again. We didn't go gaga (the design doesn't really push past IGYU and you can't respond...argh...), BUT there's A LOT here to like - and we plan to give it another shot sooner than later... and link it to Korea for the whole enchilada (the only manly thing to do).

We'd give it a thumbs up based on our bootcamp session.

Additionally, I'm looking forward to seeing the system taken to Eastern Europe (Ukraine & the Baltics!) ...nudge,nudge and the development of the political/random events mechanic which I hear is in the making. Hats off to the designer for tackling a difficult design problem: a modern war wargame that is fun, well integrates land/sea/air, has enough levers and knobs to keep us hardcores fully engaged and bakes in some political dynamics/constraints.

Other 1st MN sessions reports:

1st MN/Sawatdee/Herr Dr Session Reports





58 
 Thumb up
7.55
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jim Ransom
United States
Jacksonville
Florida
flag msg tools
badge
This is the only look at me you will get. The first hint the bad guy gets that I am nearby will be the sound of the torpedo coming out of his baffles with high up-doppler.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: 1st Mn Jumps in Cold: Jan 9th Bootcamp Session Taiwan Report
Thanks for the good report. Got me excited to start working on my copy.

I enjoyed it all the way until the "full hairy arses" comment. Didn't need that visual first thing on Sunday morning!

6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Gordon J
United States
Eagan
Minnesota
flag msg tools
Print and Play Gamer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: 1st Mn Jumps in Cold: Jan 9th Bootcamp Session Taiwan Report
Well done. Interesting read as always.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Xesqui BCN
msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: 1st Mn Jumps in Cold: Jan 9th Bootcamp Session Taiwan Report
Very well written AAR!
Nice to read that your team enjoyed the game!
Waiting to read soon another session of the game
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Rob Tyson
United States
Landing
New Jersey
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: 1st Mn Jumps in Cold: Jan 9th Bootcamp Session Taiwan Report
Well done review and AAR. Not exactly my kind of game, but still it was a good read and the pics really help.

However, not sure I consider a "Bergish" CRT a good thing. A ton of different modifiers, but the end results usually just end up being +1/-1.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mb
Re: 1st Mn Jumps in Cold: Jan 9th Bootcamp Session Taiwan Report
Great AAR and interesting commentary on "modern war" games. Though I'm surprised you included Empire of the Sun as a "modern war" since I think of that category as being post-WW2.

For some reason I'm really intrigued by the Next War India-Pakistan that's on GMT's P500...
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Dockter
United States
Minnesota
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: 1st Mn Jumps in Cold: Jan 9th Bootcamp Session Taiwan Report
Empire of the Sun I think of as the best integration of land/sea/air I've ever played, although I'm a big Britain Stands Alone and Narvik fan also. Modern as in terms of WWII or later, although, agree, "modern" in our hobby is post WW2. I guess I'd love to see someone take Herman's model and apply to hypothetical modern conflict.

We got to get The Next War and the infamous Liechtenstein counter on the table at 1st Mn, Mr.Wendell.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mb
Re: 1st Mn Jumps in Cold: Jan 9th Bootcamp Session Taiwan Report
Herr Dr wrote:

We got to get The Next War and the infamous Liechtenstein counter on the table at 1st Mn, Mr.Wendell.


Nope. I've played that game and I didn't like it! I'm pretty tolerant but I found putting multiple status markers on the same unit to be beyond my limits for patience.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Douglas Bush
United States
Arlington
Virginia
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: 1st Mn Jumps in Cold: Jan 9th Bootcamp Session Taiwan Report
Great AAR. It is a complex system, so tough to pick up "cold" and play the advanced game. But... with enough study it's a great system. Lots of chrome but fairly simple mechanics.

Truth in advertising: I'm designing "Next War: India-Pakistan" with Mitchell.

Doug
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Dockter
United States
Minnesota
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: 1st Mn Jumps in Cold: Jan 9th Bootcamp Session Taiwan Report
wheelsboy wrote:
Great AAR. It is a complex system, so tough to pick up "cold" and play the advanced game. But... with enough study it's a great system. Lots of chrome but fairly simple mechanics.

Truth in advertising: I'm designing "Next War: India-Pakistan" with Mitchell.

Doug


Best of luck with the next module; interesting topic! After that, please move on to Eastern Europe


Rockhopper01 wrote:
Nice report. Y'all make me feel a lot better that my solo Strategic Surprise has also taken a few hours to get through the first turn!


Endeavor to persevere arrrh
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Matt Irsik
United States
Clearfield
Utah
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: 1st Mn Jumps in Cold: Jan 9th Bootcamp Session Taiwan Report
I think it might be wise to start with Next War: Korea then get into this game. The combination of naval movement/combat, amphibious assault, airmobile/airborne on top of everything else makes a difficult game to learn that much tougher your first time out.

Having said that, however, this is a very good series, especially the air combat system. In fact, you can just play the air campaign in both games without setting up the ground units!
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
James Dean
United States
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: 1st Mn Jumps in Cold: Jan 9th Bootcamp Session Taiwan Report
Haha, I'm playing though the standard game of Next War: Korea, and that is what happens fairly often, i.e. After all the modifiers fornthebattackers and defenders are tallied, you end up with a simple +/-1 modifier!

But I like it anyway.

All the various modifiers take the randomness of the CRT, and let a players operational decisions impact their success or failure for that particular combat. So yes, whether you win or lose a fight depends sort of on a random role. But really, when you play it well, your choices on how much fixed and rotary air support to allocate, whether to use mech or leg infantry, whether to surround an enemy or spread your attacks across a broader front, will determine your success and failure. So it becomes a test to see which player can mass the most DRMs. If you can manage a -6 or so, then you can really get to a point where the CRT roll really only determines whether the defender is obliterated, or only mostly annihilated.

This was an awesome AAR, great fun to read!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Brandon H
msg tools
Re: 1st Mn Jumps in Cold: Jan 9th Bootcamp Session Taiwan Report
Hello guys,

This game looks very cool! And very nice report with pictures! Thanks for sharing!

How long does it take to learn and play this game?

Are you guys going to play this game again sometimes? Can I come in to learn and observe?

I have played some Axis and Allies but this game seems A LOT more complicated.

Thanks,

Brandon
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Dockter
United States
Minnesota
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: 1st Mn Jumps in Cold: Jan 9th Bootcamp Session Taiwan Report
Time to learn? Depends if you have a guide/dungeon master. If you do, it is fairly easy. The rulebook isn't bad.

Time to play? Hmmm...we only "bootcamped it". I guess 20 to 30 hours (that's if you use the advanced air rules)...3 long sessions.

Yes, we'll be playing it again...probably later in the year (and we'll link it with Next War: Korea . A couple of other monsters are in the pipe before it:

The Siege of Jerusalem (Third Edition) (been a lot of demand for that...1st MN AAR on BGG)

Storm of Steel (been sitting in our closets forever)

The Third World War (1st MN AAR)

Vietnam 1965-1975 (This a long, long, long game)

The Civil War (anything from Victory Games is usually great)

...and The Korean War (love that game) (multiple 1st MN AARs)

Of course, as usual, any shiny new game that we suddenly go ga-ga over jumps to the front of the line.We usually post on our (First Minnesota Historical Wargame Society) weekly blog when we will be playing - and, of course, feel free to join - always room for one more wargamer!

And, believe or not, these games are really not that more complicated than A&A - especially when you play as a part of a team.

1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Gordon J
United States
Eagan
Minnesota
flag msg tools
Print and Play Gamer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: 1st Mn Jumps in Cold: Jan 9th Bootcamp Session Taiwan Report
bmonn wrote:
Hello guys,

This game looks very cool! And very nice report with pictures! Thanks for sharing!

How long does it take to learn and play this game?

Are you guys going to play this game again sometimes? Can I come in to learn and observe?

I have played some Axis and Allies but this game seems A LOT more complicated.

Thanks,

Brandon


We game at the Source Comics & Games every Friday starting around 3-4pm to midnight-ish.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Dockter
United States
Minnesota
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: 1st Mn Jumps in Cold: Jan 9th Bootcamp Session Taiwan Report
To add to Gordo's comments, we usually start the monsters at 11AMish on Fridays - but, we'll probably have a break until after tax season. The featured monster wargame goes all day & night with people jumping in and out. Our AARs here: 1st MN/Sawatdee/Herr Dr Session Reports

2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Brandon H
msg tools
Re: 1st Mn Jumps in Cold: Jan 9th Bootcamp Session Taiwan Report
oh wow that sounds pretty fun! Sounds like you guys have a very active group here in Twin Cities, I can't believe I didn't find this group earlier!

Thanks for the quick reply, I will definitely find a Friday to check you guys out.

Thanks!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Gordon J
United States
Eagan
Minnesota
flag msg tools
Print and Play Gamer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: 1st Mn Jumps in Cold: Jan 9th Bootcamp Session Taiwan Report
bmonn wrote:
oh wow that sounds pretty fun! Sounds like you guys have a very active group here in Twin Cities, I can't believe I didn't find this group earlier!

Thanks for the quick reply, I will definitely find a Friday to check you guys out.

Thanks!


If you ever have a question feel free to geekmail either one of us.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mike Willner
United States
Brooklyn
New York
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: 1st Mn Jumps in Cold: Jan 9th Bootcamp Session Taiwan Report
Thank you, gents. Your AAR inspired me to acquire a copy of this game and we're tee'ing it up right after we finish our game of "Breaking the Chains".
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Dockter
United States
Minnesota
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: 1st Mn Jumps in Cold: Jan 9th Bootcamp Session Taiwan Report
On Thursday, March 12, Joel Toppen will be hosting part 2 of a series of demos that teach you how to play the NEXT WAR series: http://www.gmtgames.com/t-GMTVentrilo.aspx

Joel's similar efforts on Empire of the Sun were VERY good. Those also could be downloaded as a podcast.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.