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Subject: Digital killed the analog star (Web article on boardgaming) rss

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Richard Hutnik
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http://www.joystiq.com/2006/10/12/digital-killed-the-analog-...

Interesting article explaining why we still need boardgames and cardgames. Goes into the advantages.

Off the Grid will be covering boardgames and cardgames. This is the intro article. The ending:
We have a lot of ground to cover, and we've only barely scratched the surface. In the coming weeks and months, I'll be looking at classic and modern marvels of board game design, as well as speaking with developers about their non-digital distractions. We've already taken a look at Crossroads, a truly mobile game, and hopefully we'll have a chance to check out similar projects as time goes on. In the meantime, let's together try to remember our true roots.

Let's remember that gaming's not just about screentime anymore.
 
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Greg Pool
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Interesting read. This comment down below caught my eye, though:

Quote:
16. I think the primary reason that video game culture has eclipsed boardgame culture has been overlooked: A video game is fun with only one player.

I'm sure there are exceptions in the analog game world (like solitaire, I suppose). But no analog technology can make a single-player game as engaging as interacting with a computer.


How many of us have games on our shelves that just don't get played because you can't get "the group" together on a regular basis?

Unfortunately, one of my favorite games to play solo is Cribbage on the PalmOS.

http://home.san.rr.com/mayes/cribbage.html

I learned Cribbage in the fifth grade, and have always wished I could play it more with people. I guess I could try Solitaire Cribbage.

http://www.pagat.com/invented/cribbage_solitaire.html
 
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Kurt
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Re: Digital killed the analog star (Web article on boardgami
ced1106 wrote:
Had some comments about the article, but I liked the reader comment that boardgames vs. video games was a "false choice":



Definitely. Everyone wants things boiled down into neat little yes/no, 1/0, black/white answers. While computers and political parties may insist on operating that way, the world is not binary (unless you really get deep into philosophy, then it could be argued that it either is or it isn't, but that's a whole other discussion )

I'll take both please.
 
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Myke Madsen
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Re: Digital killed the analog star (Web article on boardgami
I believe Reiner Knizia made a similar comment in one of the GeekSpeak episodes about choosing between video- and boardgames being a false choice.
 
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Richard Hutnik
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Re: Digital killed the analog star (Web article on boardgami
Anyone want to get into the replies to the article there and tell people there are better choices than Monopoly and Uno? UGH!

Hoping Carcassone takes XBox Live by storm... the basic version, not variant set that turns it into ASL using the D20 set of rules
 
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Kevin H
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Seeing that the Playstation 3 will retail at $600 U.S surprise

...Boardgames vs. Videogames is not a false choice.

That $1,000 either goes to a few dozen boardgames, or it goes to a PS3 and 2 or 3 games, another controller, etc.
 
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Eddie the Cranky Gamer
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The real discussion is about why so many people are "choosing" video games and so few are "choosing" board games. It is not an OR issue, but I'd be surprised if board game sales were 1% of video games.
 
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shumyum
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Re: Digital killed the analog star (Web article on boardgami
Nice article.

I also agree that it's a false choice. If people weren't playing videogames, there would be a rise in TV-watching, sports-playing, model-building, spreadsheet-making and aquarium-tending AS WELL AS boardgaming.

 
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Isaac Citrom
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Actually, I would guess that boardgame sales versus video game sales is more on the order of 0.001%, if you consider that only Halo has sold in the hundreds of millions of dollars.

I have three sons 11, 13, and 14. I'm afraid I have not done a very good job of inspiring them to play boardgames. I really must drag them to it. Video games are definitely at the top of their list. This is what I have observed:

Why are films more popular than comic books more popular than books. Likewise, why is "pop" music more popular than Jazz more popular than classical music. It is a matter of decoding. It is much easier to decode a film than it is a book. Likewise, it is much easier to decode a video game than it is a boardgame. My eldest will pick up the Xbox controller with a new game, try all the buttons and he's swimming in just a few minutes. Not so with a boardgame where one has to--oh my god--read the rules.

As mentioned the solitaire factor is definitely an issue.

Escapism, I see, is also a major factor. After all, why do we play games at all. There are several reasons but a major one is escapism or immersion into the theme. Boardgames, I think, simply cannot compete with the total immersion factor of video games. Compare War of the Ring, for example, with any of the LotR video war games.

Also related to immersion but related to decoding is the complexity of the rules. The more abstract a game is the easier it is to learn the rules. The closer to reality a game is the more complex the rules. Compare Settlers of Catan to ASL or Dungeons & Dragons. So, if one craves more immersion, one has to deal with the much more complex rules. Personally, I am very attracted to ASL. But frankly, I have no desire to turn myself into an organic computer. The point of ASL is to immerse oneself into WWII tactical combat, not to be a human difference engine. We have computers now that do all of this quite well. In the 1970s we did not.

Yes, my boys like games as much as we do. My strong impression is that they view boardgaming as quaint and an outdated mode of gaming.

I would like to add one more point regarding to the complexity of boardgame rules and decoding. My sister is the typical fashionista. I think secretly Paris Hilton is her hero. And yet, she had a supreme blast when once I got her to play Diplomacy. But, there is no way in heaven or hell she is going to sit down and learn something like War of the Ring or Twilight Imperium. And, by far, she is closer to the mainstream than most of us.

I am looking forward to a marriage between boardgames and computers. Thin, large, horizontal and perhaps flexible monitors will soon, I believe, act as interactive game boards. We can still use our bits. But, most importantly, the 50 page legalese rule books will be relegated to software (where it should be in my opinion). Really; the ASL rulebook reads like pseudocode.

 
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