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Subject: Measles Parties rss

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I just learned that some parents are sending their kids to measles parties, in order to get them infected.

I think these kids would have much more fun at a gonorrhea or syphilis party.

At least the transmission method for those pathogens is more enjoyable.
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Steve Rogers
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Maybe they got the idea from South Park...
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Donald
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epilgrim wrote:
Maybe they got the idea from South Park...


Who got the idea from the Simpsons.

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Donald wrote:
epilgrim wrote:
Maybe they got the idea from South Park...


Who got the idea from the Simpsons.



Who got the idea from pre-MMR vaccine parenting.
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Eric "Shippy McShipperson" Mowrer
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Yeah, my parents put me in with my brother when he got chicken pox so we'd have it together. They weren't anti-vaxxers, that's just what you did to avoid having both kids get it at separate times, which would be fairly likely.
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GuidoVanHorn wrote:
Donald wrote:
epilgrim wrote:
Maybe they got the idea from South Park...


Who got the idea from the Simpsons.



Who got the idea from pre-MMR vaccine parenting.


Which had vastly higher child mortality rates.
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ejmowrer wrote:
Yeah, my parents put me in with my brother when he got chicken pox so we'd have it together. They weren't anti-vaxxers, that's just what you did to avoid having both kids get it at separate times, which would be fairly likely.


That's Chicken Pox, which you want your kids to get when they're young because it's less likely to be, well, as devastating as it is when one contracts it as an adult.

Measles you DON'T want your kid to get. Period. Full stop. Idiots taking their kids to Measles parties are idiots. Exclamation point.
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I thought I remember a discussion here about measles lollipops once. At least you could get your measles in a tangy black cherry flavor that way.
 
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THIS IS AN ANNOUNCEMENT. THE ONION IS A POLITICAL SATIRE SITE. THOSE OF YOU WHO POST STORIES FROM THERE IN RSP ARE THE TRUE IDIOTS. THANK YOU. THIS CONCLUDES THIS PSA.

http://www.theonion.com/articles/report-antivaxxer-parents-c...

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The Onion is merely joking about a topic that is, in fact, under discussion in other parts of the more mainstream media. Do try to keep up.
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MisterCranky wrote:
The Onion is merely joking about a topic that is, in fact, under discussion in other parts of the more mainstream media. Do try to keep up.

Just because the "more mainstream media" is spinning its wheels about unsubstantiated rumors doesn't make them any less unsubstantiated rumors.
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When I was a kid there there was no vaccine for chicken pox. I remember my mother mentioning one of her co-workers took her kid to a chicken pox party which she thought was extremely reckless. In my case there was no need. My elementary school literally turned into a Chicken Pox party as the virus swept through the school for several weeks.

In terms of the measles I've been vaccinated 3 times against them. The first time I was to young for the shot and they knew it at the time. My sister however had been exposed so as a precaution they vaccinated me thinking that by time she became contagious I would have some immunity to it. She got the measles and I didn't. I was then vaccinated again as it was required to enter Kindergarten. I think they knew at that point I had had the first shot to early. Then in Junior High they did a checking of the records and found I had been vaccinated to early so I was required to get it a third time. They later found in my file the record of my second vaccination.

While I think this is a joke heaven knows there are people I think who would do something stupid like this.
 
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MisterCranky wrote:
The Onion is merely joking about a topic that is, in fact, under discussion in other parts of the more mainstream media. Do try to keep up.


gulp
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Mac Mcleod
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frumpish wrote:
I just learned that some parents are sending their kids to measles parties, in order to get them infected.

I think these kids would have much more fun at a gonorrhea or syphilis party.

At least the transmission method for those pathogens is more enjoyable.


We actually used to still do this when I was a kid. (Chicken pox too).

It provides herd immunity at least so it's not creating a large population ready to have an epidemic and kill everyone with a weak immune system.

Hmm. Now I'm wondering if I have them confused. I did get a shot on the arm for something that left the divot for a long time. It it didnt' fade until I was in my 30's.

---

Okay, the vaccine came out in 1971 so I'm sure I had already had it by then. Perhaps it was polio.

Oh wow..
http://www.reddit.com/r/askscience/comments/28idhb/how_come_...

Looks like it might have been smallpox.


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I, and every kid in my neighbourhood, went to a measles party in 1975. We all swapped shirts and shared lollipops. Then we all got a bit sick, and then immune for life. Since we were all solidly middle class, well-nourished, and otherwise healthy, none of us had any complications. As I understand it, that's pretty much what happens to most kids who get the measles.

I dunno how relatively stupid or parents were. Among them were two medical doctors (a coroner and an immunologist), two engineers, an accountant, two social scientists, a carpenter, a baker, a cowboy (no, really).
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We did parties for chicken pox, mumps and rubella (German measles to us). IIRC we did get measles vaccinations separately (I think the MMR vaccination didn't became standard until a couple of years after I started school).
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tommynomad wrote:
Since we were all solidly middle class, well-nourished, and otherwise healthy, none of us had any complications.


You were fortunate. That's not always how it goes. My grandmother got it when she was 12, lost most of her hearing, and was deaf by the time she was an adult. My boss got it as a child and almost died from it. Their economic status and education of their parents had nothing to do with whether they experienced complications from the virus or not.
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maxo-texas wrote:
Okay, the vaccine came out in 1971 so I'm sure I had already had it by then. Perhaps it was polio.

The first vaccine came out in 1963. MMR combo debuted in 1971.

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It takes some warped reasoning to think that your child getting measles and potentially suffering complications is a better solution than a vaccine.

Measles isn't Darth Vader, and your children aren't Obi-Wan. #geek

"You can't win, Darth. If you strike me down, I shall become more powerful than you could possibly imagine."
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tommynomad wrote:
I, and every kid in my neighbourhood, went to a measles party in 1975. We all swapped shirts and shared lollipops. Then we all got a bit sick, and then immune for life.


This is not really plausible. You're remembering something wrong. Maybe you're thinking of chicken pox? There was very little incidence of measles in the US by 1975.



Quote:
As I understand it, that's pretty much what happens to most kids who get the measles.


Sure. But a nontrivial fraction get serious illness and permanent lifelong complications.
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damiangerous wrote:
MisterCranky wrote:
The Onion is merely joking about a topic that is, in fact, under discussion in other parts of the more mainstream media. Do try to keep up.

Just because the "more mainstream media" is spinning its wheels about unsubstantiated rumors doesn't make them any less unsubstantiated rumors.


The only wheels spinning around here are from the unsubstantiated rumors of your powers of analysis. The story coming out of California is not that some woman claimed that an offhand comment was made to her that her kids could be exposed to measles, but rather that health officials responded to her reporting of this non-event, because they understood the very, very real fear that the same stupid idiots who refuse to actually vaccinate their children might get the idea to hold this sort of gathering. Spinning your wheels is when you leap to the defense of somebody who castigates people for discussing an actual event, because she fails to understand how it is that The Onion operates.
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galad2003 wrote:
But questioning the law and regulations on what vaccines and how soon/how often to get vaccinated doesn't mean i am anti-vaccine.


Yes, it does.

If you had some actual scientific evidence or data or reasoning, that would be one thing.

But "my intuition tells me taking the shots at a different time would be better" just doesn't count. That's no better than the anti-climate science nuts.
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xilan wrote:

Licensing doesn't mean it was in use though. Here in the UK single jab measles vaccine wasn't available until 1970, and even then it didn't see widespread inclusion into our vaccination program until 1980 (spurred by an outbreak IIRC). MMR replaced it in 1988.

Measles parties were fairly common when I was a kid, but then again so was rickets.
 
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Eric "Shippy McShipperson" Mowrer
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http://www.snopes.com/politics/medical/measlesparties.asp

No mention of the Onion. They're not happening on any scale worth reporting on, if at all. Everybody seems to be wrong.
 
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There is no Dana, only Zuul
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Archonsod wrote:
xilan wrote:

Licensing doesn't mean it was in use though. Here in the UK single jab measles vaccine wasn't available until 1970, and even then it didn't see widespread inclusion into our vaccination program until 1980 (spurred by an outbreak IIRC). MMR replaced it in 1988.

Measles parties were fairly common when I was a kid, but then again so was rickets.


Mac is talking about the US, not the UK. It was in use. Maybe you missed the graph that's been shown over and over - even in this thread, right here. The drop during that time wasn't due to the sometimes idiotic assertion that suddenly we started washing our hands and transmission dropped. It was the use of vaccine.
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