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Baseball Highlights: 2045» Forums » Rules

Subject: Baserunning question rss

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Matt Boehland
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There's a medium runner on second, and a slow runner on third.

A single is hit.

Does the runner on second score or get held up by the slow runner?

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Nathan James
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Both should score.
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Max Jamelli
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NJames wrote:
Both should score.


And both do score.
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Ralph H. Anderson
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The answers are correct.

Here is how I like to apply Base Runners. I start with the Base Runner on the highest base to move first and work backwards to the Batter. That way you can easily see whether the bases are clear for additional movement for fast runners.

For Walks, I apply the opposite effect. I start with the Batter and advance only any Base Runners that are "pushed" by the walk. This means that NO one moves other than the Batter if there is no Base Runner on 1st.

Hope this helps!
Ralph
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Dan King (The Game Boy Geek)
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Hi Ralph,
This is a great suggestion and maybe could be added to the official FAQ.
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Robert Searing
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Quote:
Here is how I like to apply Base Runners. I start with the Base Runner on the highest base to move first and work backwards to the Batter. That way you can easily see whether the bases are clear for additional movement for fast runners.


Ralph - question for you (and perhaps it's answered - a few pages later, but I saw this and thought I'd ask -

Say I have an average runner on 3rd and a slow on 2nd and nobody on 3rd. I hit a single with a slow runner....Does everyone advance....even though they aren't being pushed? (so Average on third would score, and slow would move to third and slow is on 1st?)

I've been playing that people stay on base unless they are pushed...So - another example would be a runner on third - nobody on 2nd - and a single is hit - there's nobody on 2nd to push the guy on 3rd into home.....but he advances anyways?

Thanks much!
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Rick Teverbaugh
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Runners move without being pushed. Walks are the only thing where runners don't move unless pushed.
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Robert Searing
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Man - did I get that rule wrong...lol. I was playing so that people only scored if pushed into home - that actually makes many of the other rules that were boggling me make more sense. I should have read the base runners section more thoroughly - I (incorrectly) assumed that this ONLY came into play when the hit was made - not indicative of running while they're on base as well.....

Thanks!
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Eduardo Cominguez
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A little thought I share about what helped me to understand and enjoy this boardgame more...

I think that some problems we have are related to the lack of knowledge about real baseball.
I try to solve this situations thinking on the real game.

A hit, is a player hitting the ball... in the real game the base runners run when the ball is hit, all of them, of course there are exceptions... but no for this game, a hit that was not canceled is always a perfect hit, so you can run safely to the next base or the number of bases your attributes/properties allow based on the kind of hit (single/double/triple/HR).

If you do not know the real game (I live in a country where this game does not exist, or is rarely played), you are missing part of the fun this game has. The real game is great, my opinion, and this board game capture some great things of the real game.

I am still learning... I don´t get yet, in the real game, when can you start to steal a base. and I still need help to know... in a fly, when the base runners can start to run.
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Robert Barnhart
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ecominguez wrote:
A little thought I share about what helped me to understand and enjoy this boardgame more...

I think that some problems we have are related to the lack of knowledge about real baseball.
I try to solve this situations thinking on the real game.

A hit, is a player hitting the ball... in the real game the base runners run when the ball is hit, all of them, of course there are exceptions... but no for this game, a hit that was not canceled is always a perfect hit, so you can run safely to the next base or the number of bases your attributes/properties allow based on the kind of hit (single/double/triple/HR).

If you do not know the real game (I live in a country where this game does not exist, or is rarely played), you are missing part of the fun this game has. The real game is great, my opinion, and this board game capture some great things of the real game.

I am still learning... I don´t get yet, in the real game, when can you start to steal a base. and I still need help to know... in a fly, when the base runners can start to run.


Real Game Answers:

1. You may start to steal a base as soon as play is resumed. Most runners don't do this because the pitcher would simply throw the ball to 2nd/3rd and you would be picked off. Most runners take a few step lead off the base and start to run as soon as the pitcher begins his motion. Once the pitcher begins his motion he may not stop and throw to a base - he must throw the pitch. Otherwise this is known as a "balk" and the hitter gets a free base as though he had been walked.

2. Base runners may begin running in the same fashion - whenever play resumes. There is no difference whether a runner may leave his base on a fly ball or a groundout. If a ball is caught on the fly, however, any runner who has left his base must return and if the ball is thrown to that base before the runner returns, he is also out. Therefore, many runners wait on the base until the ball is caught. In that case, the runner may freely leave after the ball is caught and try to get an additional base even though the batter is out. This is known as "tagging up." If the hit results in a run it is commonly called a "sacrifice fly," because the batter has traded an out for a run, essentially.

Hope that helps! It probably is not an exactly correct answer per the written rules but it should make the real game of baseball make more sense.
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Eduardo Cominguez
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positivelyrob wrote:
ecominguez wrote:
A little thought I share about what helped me to understand and enjoy this boardgame more...

I think that some problems we have are related to the lack of knowledge about real baseball.
I try to solve this situations thinking on the real game.

A hit, is a player hitting the ball... in the real game the base runners run when the ball is hit, all of them, of course there are exceptions... but no for this game, a hit that was not canceled is always a perfect hit, so you can run safely to the next base or the number of bases your attributes/properties allow based on the kind of hit (single/double/triple/HR).

If you do not know the real game (I live in a country where this game does not exist, or is rarely played), you are missing part of the fun this game has. The real game is great, my opinion, and this board game capture some great things of the real game.

I am still learning... I don´t get yet, in the real game, when can you start to steal a base. and I still need help to know... in a fly, when the base runners can start to run.


Real Game Answers:

1. You may start to steal a base as soon as play is resumed. Most runners don't do this because the pitcher would simply throw the ball to 2nd/3rd and you would be picked off. Most runners take a few step lead off the base and start to run as soon as the pitcher begins his motion. Once the pitcher begins his motion he may not stop and throw to a base - he must throw the pitch. Otherwise this is known as a "balk" and the hitter gets a free base as though he had been walked.

2. Base runners may begin running in the same fashion - whenever play resumes. There is no difference whether a runner may leave his base on a fly ball or a groundout. If a ball is caught on the fly, however, any runner who has left his base must return and if the ball is thrown to that base before the runner returns, he is also out. Therefore, many runners wait on the base until the ball is caught. In that case, the runner may freely leave after the ball is caught and try to get an additional base even though the batter is out. This is known as "tagging up." If the hit results in a run it is commonly called a "sacrifice fly," because the batter has traded an out for a run, essentially.

Hope that helps! It probably is not an exactly correct answer per the written rules but it should make the real game of baseball make more sense.


Thank you a lot Robert, Does the rules tell what sign indicates the pitcher started his motion?. I have to get that, I will see a match to get that.

On 2, greate answer too, I was always thinking that the base runner could not run until the ball hit the floor or was catched... but was not always like that, so I get confused.
But after what you say, it is a desision of the base runner, he is the one that choose to take the risk, he can run as soon as the pitcher start the motion.

Thank you again.

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Robert Barnhart
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ecominguez wrote:
positivelyrob wrote:
ecominguez wrote:
A little thought I share about what helped me to understand and enjoy this boardgame more...

I think that some problems we have are related to the lack of knowledge about real baseball.
I try to solve this situations thinking on the real game.

A hit, is a player hitting the ball... in the real game the base runners run when the ball is hit, all of them, of course there are exceptions... but no for this game, a hit that was not canceled is always a perfect hit, so you can run safely to the next base or the number of bases your attributes/properties allow based on the kind of hit (single/double/triple/HR).

If you do not know the real game (I live in a country where this game does not exist, or is rarely played), you are missing part of the fun this game has. The real game is great, my opinion, and this board game capture some great things of the real game.

I am still learning... I don´t get yet, in the real game, when can you start to steal a base. and I still need help to know... in a fly, when the base runners can start to run.


Real Game Answers:

1. You may start to steal a base as soon as play is resumed. Most runners don't do this because the pitcher would simply throw the ball to 2nd/3rd and you would be picked off. Most runners take a few step lead off the base and start to run as soon as the pitcher begins his motion. Once the pitcher begins his motion he may not stop and throw to a base - he must throw the pitch. Otherwise this is known as a "balk" and the hitter gets a free base as though he had been walked.

2. Base runners may begin running in the same fashion - whenever play resumes. There is no difference whether a runner may leave his base on a fly ball or a groundout. If a ball is caught on the fly, however, any runner who has left his base must return and if the ball is thrown to that base before the runner returns, he is also out. Therefore, many runners wait on the base until the ball is caught. In that case, the runner may freely leave after the ball is caught and try to get an additional base even though the batter is out. This is known as "tagging up." If the hit results in a run it is commonly called a "sacrifice fly," because the batter has traded an out for a run, essentially.

Hope that helps! It probably is not an exactly correct answer per the written rules but it should make the real game of baseball make more sense.


Thank you a lot Robert, Does the rules tell what sign indicates the pitcher started his motion?. I have to get that, I will see a match to get that.

On 2, greate answer too, I was always thinking that the base runner could not run until the ball hit the floor or was catched... but was not always like that, so I get confused.
But after what you say, it is a desision of the base runner, he is the one that choose to take the risk, he can run as soon as the pitcher start the motion.

Thank you again.



You're welcome. Copied from Wikipedia:

Baseball's Rule 8 (The Pitcher) specifies the pitching procedure in detail. For example, in the Set Position, the pitcher must "com[e] to a complete stop"; thereafter, "any natural motion associated with his delivery of the ball to the batter commits him to the pitch without alteration or interruption."[6]
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Dale Stephenson
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positivelyrob wrote:
1. You may start to steal a base as soon as play is resumed. Most runners don't do this because the pitcher would simply throw the ball to 2nd/3rd and you would be picked off. Most runners take a few step lead off the base and start to run as soon as the pitcher begins his motion. Once the pitcher begins his motion he may not stop and throw to a base - he must throw the pitch. Otherwise this is known as a "balk" and the hitter gets a free base as though he had been walked.


Just a slight correction -- when a balk is called the runners are entitled to advance one base, but it does not grant the batter a free base. Instead the ball is dead, unless the batter safely reaches first in some manner. If the batter does reach first and each runner advances at least one base, the balk is ignored. (Rule 8.05)

However, the main point of what you wrote is exactly correct. Balk calls are rare, but because they exist the runner can safely begin his steal when the pitcher begins his motion.
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Robert Barnhart
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dalestephenson wrote:
positivelyrob wrote:
1. You may start to steal a base as soon as play is resumed. Most runners don't do this because the pitcher would simply throw the ball to 2nd/3rd and you would be picked off. Most runners take a few step lead off the base and start to run as soon as the pitcher begins his motion. Once the pitcher begins his motion he may not stop and throw to a base - he must throw the pitch. Otherwise this is known as a "balk" and the hitter gets a free base as though he had been walked.


Just a slight correction -- when a balk is called the runners are entitled to advance one base, but it does not grant the batter a free base. Instead the ball is dead, unless the batter safely reaches first in some manner. If the batter does reach first and each runner advances at least one base, the balk is ignored. (Rule 8.05)

However, the main point of what you wrote is exactly correct. Balk calls are rare, but because they exist the runner can safely begin his steal when the pitcher begins his motion.


Woops. Thanks!
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