Recommend
 
 Thumb up
 Hide
36 Posts
1 , 2  Next »   | 

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Gaming Related » Recommendations

Subject: game recommendations: euro, ameritrash, or war? rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: recommendations [+] [View All]
Tony Chen
Taiwan
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmb
I was just reading a very insightful list on ameritrash games, and it got me thinking...

I am mostly a perfect information (abstract strategy) gamer, because I love games that require "heavy" logical reasoning (Go, Yinsh, Hive, Hex, etc). However I also love games that are purely psychological (Cheat/Bullshit, Mafia/Werewolf). Simplicity and elegance really appeal to me, which is another reason why I love Hex, Cheat and Go. I've never tried it but I doubt RPGs (too arbitrary?) or CCGs (or collectible anything for that matter) would have any appeal to me.

I've played Risk (is it Ameritrash? or medium Wargame?) and loved it, but in retrospect I think that had a lot to do with my lack of experience with other games and with my being ~13 at the time. Reading a fellow geek's classification of Ameritrash--drama, theme, screwage, and medium effort--I think the screwage factor appeals to me quite a bit, while the other qualities I am less than excited about.

So basically, I've only tried abstract strategies, and some traditional card games and party games. I am interested in trying out but have essentially no experience with euro/ameritrash/wargames. Am I missing any genres here? Civilization? So my question is, which genre (or specific games) would most likely appeal to me? Thanks, and here's my top ten for reference:

#1: Hex
#2: Go-Moku
#3: Go
#4: Cheat
#5: Quads
#6: Pylos
#7: Hive
#8: YINSH
#9: PÜNCT
#10: Othello
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Geoff Bohrer
United States
Hereford
Arizona
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Mmmmm...might try Teraforming. It's very abstract, in the sense of being strategic and having minimal component interaction, it's a pretty small upfront investment, and you can always use the cards as regular playing cards. It's also about as light a Euro as I've found.

Never having played it, I'm also going to ask Carcassonne players if it might fill the bill.

Gloom is another low initial investment handful of pure fun. MAXIMUM screwage in this one...my wife and I spend more time playing off the others' cards than our own.

You might also try the themed Risks to dip your toe in that water...though there you're looking at the best play in the world being destroyed by bad luck.

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Denise Lavely
United States
Carmel
Indiana
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Y'know, I'd try a couple of the most popular gateway games in each of those genres, and see if any of them appeal and go from there. Try maybe Settlers and Carcassonne, Axis & Allies and War of the Ring, and Command and Colors: Ancients and Hammer of the Scots, or some games along those lines (trying to stick with games that are easily available right now). Who knows, you may find you'll fall in love with something all new! I personally am finding that the more I play games, the more I like all of them
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tony Chen
Taiwan
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmb
To me abstract doesn't mean lack of interaction, though I suppose our ideas of "interaction" may differ. For example, I think there is a lot of component interaction between stones on a Go and Hex board. So yeah, I think I actually like player/playing piece interaction. Anyways thanks for the recommendations.

Gloom seems like a very humorous game. Good for some light-hearted, tongue-in-cheek screwage and humour.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Geoff Bohrer
United States
Hereford
Arizona
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Sorry...what I meant by component interaction is where the capabilities of the components are modified by other components. Such as, a foot unit in a mountain space has +1 to defense, or playing this card along with that card allows you to draw two cards, stuff like that. I agree, chess pieces and go pieces DO interact...that's the whole game!

Just was being imprecise in my speech,and I apologize. And for that matter, I'm not sure that would necessarily turn you off; part of the joys of ccgs for me is figuring out the perfect combination, which is pure logic. Just didn't strike me that many of the games on your list featured that kind of thing is all.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
フィル
Australia
Ashfield
NSW
flag msg tools
designer
badge
I've got an 808 and a 303 and a record collection like the ABC
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Try Rommel in the Desert and Aladdin's Dragons. Both have a good mix of strategy and psychology that should appeal to you. I think they're both fairly elegant too, though YMMV.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Justin Redd
United States
Portland
Oregon
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmb
You may like the more abstract euros. Tigris & Euphrates and Samurai come to mind right away.

And as a wildcard recommendation I'll suggest Princes of Florence . I find the game's auctions appeal to the card player/bluffer in me. The actions engaged the chess player in me. The game only gives you fourteen actions, so you'd better do some planning.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tony Chen
Taiwan
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmb
Quote:
Who knows, you may find you'll fall in love with something all new!
Exactly! Thanks for all the suggestions. A couple of things:

Do "gateway" games have much value beyond introducing new gamers to the genre? If not, I think I'd much rather jump straight to the good stuff! Though, from what I've read on BGG, Settlers of Catan and Carcassone both have expansions that can buff them up if, supposing, I decided I needed more of it. I just don't want to spend money and time on games just for "learning" purposes.

CCGs. They may be fun but anything collectible just seems to require lots of money, and maybe even time, that I can't afford to invest.

Very helpful/informative recommendations. Reading them, a couple of extra things came to my mind:

Has anyone played both Through the Desert and Hex? I love Hex, what does that say about the chances of my liking Through the Desert?

Has anyone read "Romance of the Three Kingdoms"? That epic novel had lots of pyschological warfare. Is there any wargame that sort of resembles that novel? Not saying I want to simulate the storyline of that novel or anything, just referring to the type of drama/psychology/strategy/atmosphere involved in the novel.

The "fog of war" in Rommel in the Desert really appeals to me. In fact, I imagine it's a must for me to enjoy a wargame. Also, some rating comments said that the rules are not too complex, which is another plus. Although they also said that they are not very well written, and that the game is out of print... Are there any other good "fog of war" wargames with no overly-complex rules that plays dynamically/fluidly and is still in print?

Aladdin's Dragons: if the bidding/bluffing strategies feels more player controlled than random, I'd probably love that game.

Samurai: from what I've read on some geeklists, I think I will enjoy this game only with 2 players.

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Thomas Granvold
United States
Santa Clara
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
drunkenKOALA wrote:
I was just reading a very insightful list on ameritrash games, and it got me thinking...

I am mostly a perfect information (abstract strategy) gamer, because I love games that require "heavy" logical reasoning (Go, Yinsh, Hive, Hex, etc). However I also love games that are purely psychological (Cheat/Bullshit, Mafia/Werewolf). Simplicity and elegance really appeal to me, which is another reason why I love Hex, Cheat and Go. I've never tried it but I doubt RPGs (too arbitrary?) or CCGs (or collectible anything for that matter) would have any appeal to me.

I've played Risk (is it Ameritrash? or medium Wargame?) and loved it, but in retrospect I think that had a lot to do with my lack of experience with other games and with my being ~13 at the time. Reading a fellow geek's classification of Ameritrash--drama, theme, screwage, and medium effort--I think the screwage factor appeals to me quite a bit, while the other qualities I am less than excited about.


Reading this the game that came to my mind is Diplomacy. An elegent game which is largly psychological where on can pull occasional great "screwage". The whole game revolves around the deals that you make with the other players, while never knowing who is going to live up to their part of the deal. Check it out if you get a chance.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
フィル
Australia
Ashfield
NSW
flag msg tools
designer
badge
I've got an 808 and a 303 and a record collection like the ABC
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
drunkenKOALA wrote:
edit: the "fog of war" in Rommel in the Desert really appeals to me. In fact, I imagine it's a must for me to enjoy a wargame. Also, some rating comments said that the rules are not too complex, which is another plus. Although they also said that they are not very well written, and that the game is out of print... Are there any other good "fog of war" wargames with no overly-complex rules that plays dynamically/fluidly and is still in print?

There are several editions of RitD. The current (2004) edition is in print and has the corrected, well written rules. You can download the rulebook if you want to check the complexity level for yourself.

http://www.columbiagames.com/cgi-bin/query/cfg/zoom.cfg?prod...

I learnt it as my first wargame with no trouble. The rules are long but generally intuitive.

The great thing about RitD as a wargame is that you can win by cutting supply lines rather than by eliminating units. This appeals to the go player in me... much of the game feels like searching for the tesuji that will collapse your opponent's position.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Phillip Heaton
United States
Springfield
Virginia
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
My first suggestion would be to find other gamers who have games you haven't played and try their games. That would give you an opportunity to try before you buy; always a good thing. You might also try gaming cons, as they will have a bunch of different games there and people who want to play them.

My second comment is that a good game is a good game; it doesn't matter what type of game it is. That being said, you seem to have some ideas about what you like but want to expand your gaming universe. I'll try to give you some ideas in various different genres.

The highest rated Adventure game that I like is Runebound Second Edition. While it isn't an RPG, it gives you some of the thrills that an RPG gives you, without a game master. The game seems pretty intuitive to me and was easy to pick up. The game can run a little long, especially the first time you play, which may not be a problem for you.

Amongst bluffing games, Liar's Dice is the highest rated on the Geek. It is an excellent party game as well.

For card games, it is San Juan that tops the list. Based on the highest rated game on the Geek, it is a good game in its own right.

Speaking of San Juan's big brother, Puerto Rico comes in as the best city building game. Holding the number one position for months, this game has what it takes.

In the civilization category, Twilight Imperium 3rd Edition takes the prize. This game captures a lot of what made Master of Orion so great as a PC game.

For fantasy games, War of the Ring wins hands down. If you enjoyed the Lord of the Rings, either the books or the movies, this game is for you. It manages to capture the feel of the story without making you a slave to the plot. This one can also run a little long, especially in the beginning, but you don't really notice it.

Political games has Twilight Struggle as the top of the heap. This is a really good game, and an excellent introduction to the true card-driven game format.

My top pick amongst the racing games is Royal Turf. It isn't as heavy a game as some on this list, but I enjoy it immensely. Almost everyone can pick this game up quickly. This is now being published as Winner's Circle.

Territory building games has Viktory II on top of my list, although The Sword of Rome: Conquest of Italy, 362-272 BC is a very close second. Viktory II is a much lighter game, but they both are fun.

In the transportation category, the three Ticket to Ride games come out on top for me, with a slight edge for TTR: Europe.

For wargames I have a problem. There are so many good ones, and I think you might like most of them. Without choosing, these are the wargames rated eight or higher on the Geek:

Advanced Squad Leader (ASL) Starter Kit #1
Advanced Squad Leader (ASL) Starter Kit #2
Ardennes '44
Arnhem - Defiant Stand
Barbarossa Army Group North, 1941
Barbarossa Army Group South, 1941
Barbarossa: Army Group Center, 1941
Bitter Woods (4th Edition)
Burning Blue, The
Canvas Eagles
Commands & Colors: Ancients
DAK
DAK2
Downtown: Air War Over Hanoi, 1965-1972
EastFront
Europe Engulfed
Fire in the Sky: The Great Pacific War 1941-1945
Grant Takes Command
Great Battles of Alexander, The: Deluxe Edition
Hannibal: Rome vs. Carthage
Here I Stand
On To Richmond
Paths of Glory
Pax Romana
Shifting Sands
Silent War
Twilight Struggle
Under the Lily Banners
War of the Ring
Whistling Death

Some other games I think you might like: Power Grid, Ingenious, Dungeon Twister.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Walt
United States
Orange County
California
flag msg tools
Before terraforming Mars, Surviving Mars is required: Paradox Interactive; Steam.
badge
Please contact me about board gaming in Orange County.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Through the Desert is the game that comes immediately to mind; the recommendation for Tigris & Euphrates may also be a good one, though I don't find it as elegant as TtD.

Since you seem to like heavy games, I suggest you try Puerto Rico or Caylus. PR is better with 4 or 5; Caylus with 2 or 3. If you choose PR, look in the files section here for an overview of the game and the frequently misplayed rules list.

My take is that you would be disappointed by most of the usual "gateway" games. But if you can find a local gaming group, try the gateway games to try out different game mechanics. A gaming group will be an invaluable source of games to try and instruction so you can learn the games quickly.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tony Chen
Taiwan
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmb
You just listed the top 3 rated games on BGG! Knizia games are recommended a lot too it seems. The camel and Mesopotamia ones look nice/promising.

I just checked the rules for Rommel. That's lots of rules, compared to what I am used to. Still, sounds like fun.

Diplomacy, is it like Risk plus negotiation? Seems like this could get nasty with the wrong group of people.

Another game that caught my eye is Modern Art.

Regarding Twilight Imperium and other civilization games: are they all similar to Sid Meier's computer game "Civilization III"? I played it and was less than fascinated by it. It seemed too repetitive/addictive.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Walt
United States
Orange County
California
flag msg tools
Before terraforming Mars, Surviving Mars is required: Paradox Interactive; Steam.
badge
Please contact me about board gaming in Orange County.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
drunkenKOALA wrote:
You just listed the top 3 rated games on BGG! Knizia games are recommended a lot too it seems. The camel and Mesopotamia ones look nice/promising.


I didn't just pull them off the top list! You seem like you like quite heavy games, and those are the games that rise high on the Geek. I'm usually recommending much lighter games. I'm a little lukewarn on E&T, and I suggest you get one of PR or Caylus to see how much you dislike themed games. I would be 100% behind PR except it's hard to learn to play correctly from the rulebook and it plays best 4-5.

My take is that you're looking for intellectual challenge more than a chancy or social game. You haven't expressed a need for a game that's playable by lighter gamers, non-gamers etc.

drunkenKOALA wrote:
Diplomacy, is it like Risk plus negotiation? Seems like this could get nasty with the wrong group of people.


You got it in one: it is a dangerous game to play with friends, family, or coworkers. It has truly epic screwage. I've seen adult players stomp away from a Diplomacy game because they got totally screwed. (I was the screwer not the screwee, thankyouverymuch!)

drunkenKOALA wrote:
Regarding Twilight Imperium and other civilization games: are they all similar to Sid Meier's computer game "Civilization III"? I played it and was less than fascinated by it. It seemed too repetitive/addictive.


I can't comment on most of the Civ board games. Civ III was probably the worst of the Civ computer games, especially out of the box, unpatched--it was appalling. No boardgame I've seen matches the Civ computer games: this is understandable since board games generally aim for an hour or two, and four is extreme; Civ games tend to allow games of 20 or 40 hours or even more since you cen save the game in an instant and pick it up later--and computer opponents often take little time for their turns. Expectations were very high for Tempus as being the holy grail of a two hour Civ game; I think the concensus is that the game is ok, but not the holy grail. I tend to think the holy grail is unattainable because of the time differences I noted.

I would delay Civ games until you get more experience with Eurogame mechanics. If you didn't seem to dislike chance in games, I would have recommended Cleopatra and the Society of Architects as a collection of an amazing number of mechanics in an easily played package.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tony Chen
Taiwan
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmb
Quote:
I didn't just pull them off the top list!

lol I know. I was just pointing out the coincidence. Or maybe it isn't a coincidence.
Quote:
My take is that you're looking for intellectual challenge more than a chancy or social game. You haven't expressed a need for a game that's playable by lighter gamers, non-gamers etc.

Yup.

Chance is alright as long as skill can easily overcome the luck factor. And by skill I don't mean memorizing/calculating probabilities, or at least not exclusively so. For example I don't like Black Jack or Mah Jong. Well maybe in a gambling/social setting but for gaming purposes no. I think the type of chancy games I'd like most are those with lots of bluffing involved.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Walt
United States
Orange County
California
flag msg tools
Before terraforming Mars, Surviving Mars is required: Paradox Interactive; Steam.
badge
Please contact me about board gaming in Orange County.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
drunkenKOALA wrote:
I was just pointing out the coincidence. Or maybe it isn't a coincidence.


If it's a coincidence, it's a co-incidence in that you like heavy games with little luck and so do the most dedicated Geeks.

drunkenKOALA wrote:
Chance is alright as long as skill can easily overcome the luck factor. And by skill I don't mean memorizing/calculating probabilities, or at least not exclusively so. For example I don't like Black Jack or Mah Jong. Well maybe in a gambling/social setting but for gaming purposes no. I think the type of chancy games I'd like most are those with lots of bluffing involved.


That's what I got from you. One thing I've learned as a gaming organizer is not to try to impose my tastes on other people, but to try to find games we both like. I'm very happy playing backgammon or any number of card or card-driven games, but I don't think those would be attractive to you.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
Unspecified
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
"You might also try the themed Risks to dip your toe in that water...though there you're looking at the best play in the world being destroyed by bad luck." Geoff Bohrer[/q]

(Still new at posting, wanna give credit where it is due)

I don't play many abstract games and based on recent discussions on the Geek I guess my tastes lean towards the "Ameritrash" games (hate that term, it sounds so derrogatory), but I think that the new Risk variants are alot of fun.

I haven't played Godstorm but my gaming group really enjoyes Risk 2210. It has a more distinct playing period rather than the open ended nature of old fashion Risk. You get to play a conquest game and the commander cards and new territories put a refreshing twist on the old map. Worse comes to worse, you can use the 2210 board to play old fashion Risk if you like.

Worth a consideration if you are looking for a fun, easy world conquest game.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Alexander B.
United States
Austin
Texas
flag msg tools
mbmb
I'm not exactly sure why, but after reading your list, I thought of Leonardo di Vinci and Goa for Euro.

I think it is because these games are about planning ahead and have very low luck. What is different from Go and Chess is that you get to bid for resources against other players instead of simply out-plying them: I find this to be more fun because you get both ply and bidding rather than ply only.

Fury of Dracula might be fun for ameritrash: logical deduction game with a good dose of luck. Then again, most AT games have a good dose of luck.

Wargames? I was a big player of these games long ago but am not really up on themore recent titles. So, I'll not go there

Good luck!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tom Hancock
United States
Charleston
West Virginia
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Through the desert is the first game that comes to mind anytime an abstract fan asks for a eurogame. If you like simplicity and perfect information, euros are probably going to have more to offer you than AT or wargames.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tony Chen
Taiwan
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmb
Leonardo da Vinci and Goa look promising. I suppose Euros would appeal to me more in general but Fury of Dracula looks fun too. I played Clue a couple of times in one setting with 4 players and found it pretty fun. Though I imagine it would get old pretty fast after a couple more plays.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mark Christopher
United States
Salem
Massachusetts
flag msg tools
badge
In the wonderful game, Bonaparte at Marengo, this is how to get nasty Frenchies out of a village.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Might I suggest Bonaparte at Marengo (2 players) and Friedrich (3-4 players) as wargame choices? BaM may appeal to the abstract gamer in you, as it's a wargame with no randomness outside of the initial set-up; it ends up being a very cerebral game. Friedrich is a great psychological game in that it's a 3- (or 2-) on 1 game, but it's possible for only 1 of the 3 allies to win, and leave the others out of the victory. It also has an incredibly simple rules set for such a tense game. Both share an emphasis on maneuver and picking your battles carefully.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tony Chen
Taiwan
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmb
Actually, some of the low rating comments did as much to arouse my interest in Bonaparte at Marengo as the high rating comments did. "The game works like a chess, not like wargame." I got the feeling that it has great gameplay (which is what I am looking for), but lacks in theme, historical accuracy and storyline (which I don't care too much about).

This and Rommel are definitely on my wargame wishlist. Any other "fog of war" (secret unit deployment), "simple" rules, "chess-like" gameplay/maneauver oriented (as opposed to storyline) wargames out there? How is Hammer of Scotts? Twilight Imperium looks very pretty but how's the gameplay?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
フィル
Australia
Ashfield
NSW
flag msg tools
designer
badge
I've got an 808 and a 303 and a record collection like the ABC
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
drunkenKOALA wrote:
Actually, some of the low rating comments did as much to arouse my interest in Bonaparte at Marengo as the high rating comments did. "The game works like a chess, not like wargame." I got the feeling that it has great gameplay (which is what I am looking for), but lacks in theme, historical accuracy and storyline (which I don't care too much about).

I'm no historian, but from what I've read of the battle it's broadly accurate. The objective stars seem a bit gamey as a mechanism, but they correspond to the historical location of Napoleon's camp, so they're at least thematic. I think many of the historical criticisms are based on the scope of the game, which abtracts a lot of the historical artillery and ends before Napoleon's counterattack gets underway. But anyway, the gameplay is solid, and the story is interesting and at least partially historical (to me). You'd probably dig it.

drunkenKOALA wrote:
This and Rommel are definitely on my wargame wishlist. Any other "fog of war" (secret unit deployment), "simple" rules, "chess-like" gameplay/maneauver oriented (as opposed to storyline) wargames out there? How is Hammer of Scotts?

Hammer is probably a bit too light and chaotic for your liking. It's an enjoyable game, but less obviously deterministic than the other block games mentioned. It does have a fun shogi-like feature of defeated pieces changing sides.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mark Christopher
United States
Salem
Massachusetts
flag msg tools
badge
In the wonderful game, Bonaparte at Marengo, this is how to get nasty Frenchies out of a village.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Re Bonaparte at Marengo: I agree with Phil. Even given what the game abstracts, I think it has a ton of theme and you can get great narratives out of the game. Yah, I also think you'd dig it. Not that I'm biased.

Friedrich does have the hidden army value aspect of block games, though doesn't use the block mechanic (you track the armies separately, off-map). I'd suggest giving that one a try, too, if you can find someone with a copy.

Columbia Games' Napoleon (2-3 players) is a bit more of a traditional wargame than either BaM or Friedrich, mechanics-wise, but is very simple (6 pages of rules, I think), and given that it's played a two levels (you move your forces around a large map, and when combat starts, you move all involved armies to a separate battle board. While the battles can feel like a dice fest, there are tactical choices to be made in them. The real fun, though, is being able to move rienforcements in to the battle in progress from nearby forces. Trying to bring the enemy to battle in an area where your reinforcements will be favored over his is almost chess-like in and of itself.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tony Chen
Taiwan
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmb
Fast forward one year and I've tried many of the highly ranked games on BGG (though there are still many I haven't tried). I've even wrote reviews on some of them. Rereading this thread was funny--I was such a noob.

Thanks to all those who replied. And Tall Walt's suggestion was particularly prophetic!

Quote:
Through the Desert is the game that comes immediately to mind; the recommendation for Tigris & Euphrates may also be a good one, though I don't find it as elegant as TtD.

Since you seem to like heavy games, I suggest you try Puerto Rico or Caylus. PR is better with 4 or 5; Caylus with 2 or 3. If you choose PR, look in the files section here for an overview of the game and the frequently misplayed rules list.

My take is that you would be disappointed by most of the usual "gateway" games. But if you can find a local gaming group, try the gateway games to try out different game mechanics. A gaming group will be an invaluable source of games to try and instruction so you can learn the games quickly.


I've tried and loved T&E, Through the Desert, and Puerto Rico. And I was disappointed with the gateway games (Catan and Carcassonne). And I found a local gaming group that is awesome.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2  Next »   | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.