Recommend
1 
 Thumb up
 Hide
4 Posts

Santiago» Forums » Sessions

Subject: Bring Your Wallets - there's corruption afoot! rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Brandon Clarke
New Zealand
Auckland
Auckland
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The box says 60 minutes playing time. The rules say "may attempt to bribe to corrupt Canal Overseer. The way I see it, if you can blow through a game of Santiago in 60 minutes, then your Canal Overseer's are just not corrupt enough and/or you're not trying hard enough to corrupt them further.

The Mt. Albert Games Group had it's 2nd birthday meet last night at The Chall. We meet every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month at the Mt. Albert Baptist Church hall (The Chall), 732 New North Road, Mt. Albert Auckland. See http://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/125285. We also meet on the 5th Tuesday of the month (when there is one) and have taken to making these irregular 5th Tuesday's special event nights. With it being Halloween, a loud and boisterous game of Werewolf was conducted.

It was so loud, and so boisterous, that myself, Shernett the Pernett, Matt and Andrew, who had opted out of Werewolf in favour of a game of Santiago, had to move our table away to the other end of the Chall so we could complete the rules explanation.

I had played twice before (see http://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/125002 for the hilarious events of last time) but none of the others had, so we started with me teaching them how to play. It's one of the excellent things about Santiago that the rules are so well written, with such good examples, that instead of explaining the game to them I just read the rules. It must be said that this worked really REALLY well, because there were no major rule misunderstandings during the game.

And what a game...

Right from the very first turn, with Andrew as the corrupt Canal Overseer, the cut and thrust of the game was really on. There was a good 5 minutes of haggling, extended somewhat by me taking the time to point out the options each player faced, and explain the implications of the various courses of action. There was a palm tree in play on the very first placing, which was excellent in that it allowed nearly all of the facets of the game to be sampled in the very first turn. Shernett the Pernett placed the first proposed canal such that it would water her plot, and nobody else's. I then placed a second proposed canal such that it watered my plot, and nobody else's, and offered 2 for that canal. This left Matt's plot (containing the palm tree) not watered, and the only available canal proposal would water both my plot and Shernett's as well.

With Matt's offer accepted we moved on to round 2 and a rollickingly good game ensued. All four of us kept our Escudos in our wallets, as is now the house rule. A lot of extracurricular bribing of players to make particular offers, place tiles in particular places and/or not place tiles in particular places meant that not only was the Canal Overseer generally extremely corruptible, so was nearly every action in the game.

Many times, while we were locked in the deepest negotiations and counter offers, other members of the group walked past the table and said "Are you guys STILL going?". Our 60 minute game ran from around 7.15pm to 10.15pm - admittedly including about a 40 minute rules explanation and examples - which itself was extended due to the extremely noisy and boisterous Werewolf encounter going on nearby.

In the end Matt was a clear winner on 105 points, with Andrew and I tied for 2nd on 87 and Shernett the Pernett DFL on 83. I enjoyed this game tremendously, and in particular the fierce level of competition with 3 players playing for the first time reinforced my opinion that Santiago is a REAL keeper.

Great fun.

BC
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Gabe Alvaro
United States
Berkeley
California
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
While I too enjoy this game (played twice so far, 3 players both times), I'm curious about the haggling you did that appears to have doubled the time it seems it should have taken you to finish the game. Isn't it true that the canal overseer may irrigate the canal he chooses but at a cost of the highest bid plus one escudo? This mechanic seems to me to curtail haggling a little bit in some rounds depending on the situation with the fields. If the overseer is going to irrigate to serve his own interests players should want him to pay dearly for it.

Sometimes the negotiations are dear because crops are in immediate danger of drying out. Other times, everything is good and irrigated already and the negotiations are rather tame. Perhaps this is different in a four player game. Are crops more often likely to be in danger of drying out in a four player game as opposed to less often likely in a three player game?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Brandon Clarke
New Zealand
Auckland
Auckland
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Well we were haggling over EVERYTHING.

For example, when three people had bid in phase one, the fourth player would then offer to bid eother highest, lowest, or second etc. in return for bribes to do so.

Once everyone adopts the mindset that EVERYTHING is negotiable, then the Canal Overseer might be willing to put the canal in such a place that his/her plot does not get irrigated, and other people do, so long as the price makes it worth his while...

It can be worth letting your own crops dry out if you make enough money in the process. Also when you have finished bidding on the tiles and you are placing your tiles, you can then take side bribes on where you place your tile.

BC

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Brandon Clarke
New Zealand
Auckland
Auckland
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
blindspot wrote:
Isn't it true that the canal overseer may irrigate the canal he chooses but at a cost of the highest bid plus one escudo? This mechanic seems to me to curtail haggling a little bit in some rounds depending on the situation with the fields. If the overseer is going to irrigate to serve his own interests players should want him to pay dearly for it.


This is true, to a degree.

But there's a lot more depth to the haggling possible once you appreciate the value of different options.

For example, once the first person makes an proposal, the second player could add to the offer, either to help ensure it gets accepted, or to increase the cost to the overseer to do his/her own thing. Alternatively, if the first canal does not irrigate the third player's plot, it can be a REALLY good idea for the second player to propose a different canal - perhaps even one that ONLY helps the Canal overseer, or one that again does not help the third player, but for quite a high price.... this forces the third player to propose a canal that irrigates his plot, but it will probably bleed the third player of a significant wodge of cash (if they want to be sure the Canal overseer picks that offer).

Similarly, in the first found for example, if the Canal Overseer passed, they might reject all offers and pay the one extra Escudo to build a canal that irrigates NO plot thus causing ALL of the other player's plots to dry. This can actually be VERY worthwhile.

BC
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.