MyO the HedgeFox
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Hello!

Could you please help with a translation of a specific political term?

In a text, the author uses a term "licensed grievance" while describing Bernard Lewis' position about the events that took place there, and quotes the context from a Pew interview:


Quote:
ne of them is that Israel is an open society, and therefore journalists can come and go and report and mis-report freely, which is not true in the other places I mentioned, and that makes it very much easier for them to get media attention. The other thing is that Jews are involved. And you know the old saying, Jews are news. For much of the Middle-Eastern Arab world, Israel is a very useful topic. It is the licensed grievance. There is a pent-up rage in all these countries directed primarily against their own rulers, and therefore rulers make every effort they can to deflect it elsewhere. It surely is the “licensed” grievance and serves a very useful purpose in that respect. If that grievance were ever resolved they would have to find a new one, which would be a lot of trouble.


Could you please help me translate the term? How should it be interpreted?

Thank you in advance!
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Boaty McBoatface
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It means that in country where normally decent and protests are frowned upon you can protest about this.

It's the two minute hate, when you can throw off the shackles and shout and scream.

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MyO the HedgeFox
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So, a scapegoat topic approved by society and state that easily attracts scandal-thriving journalism and public outrage?
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Boaty McBoatface
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MyOtheHedgeFox wrote:
So, a scapegoat topic approved by society and state that easily attracts scandal-thriving journalism and public outrage?
Yes, at least as far as I see it.

It's not new, and it is not unique to either the Arab world, the developing world or the non western world.
 
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MyO the HedgeFox
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Thank you for describing it. =) Have not seen it in the articles, however: from my search it seems that Bernard Lewis is the person most quoted saying that: others are just using something more literal to describe it, that's why I had troubles interpreting the meaning. Heh. =) Will try to pick an appropriately politically veiled term in Russian for it.
 
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Boaty McBoatface
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MyOtheHedgeFox wrote:
Thank you for describing it. =) Have not seen it in the articles, however: from my search it seems that Bernard Lewis is the person most quoted saying that: others are just using something more literal to describe it, that's why I had troubles interpreting the meaning. Heh. =) Will try to pick an appropriately politically veiled term in Russian for it.
It was a tactic used in Soviet Russia, and inspired the term "two minute hate". You direct energies away from you towards (and often fictitious) enemy.
 
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MyO the HedgeFox
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In Russia, we usually say "scapegoat" (козёл отпущения): something much more rude in its expression, something that Khruschev might say without beating an eyelid and resorting to a shoeheel instead. (chuckle)
 
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Andy Leighton
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slatersteven wrote:
MyOtheHedgeFox wrote:
Thank you for describing it. =) Have not seen it in the articles, however: from my search it seems that Bernard Lewis is the person most quoted saying that: others are just using something more literal to describe it, that's why I had troubles interpreting the meaning. Heh. =) Will try to pick an appropriately politically veiled term in Russian for it.
It was a tactic used in Soviet Russia, and inspired the term "two minute hate". You direct energies away from you towards (and often fictitious) enemy.


I'm not so sure about it being a tactic actively employed in Russia. But as a term it dates back further than that. It was used in the Great War as part of British propaganda/satire of Germans.
 
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Boaty McBoatface
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andyl wrote:
slatersteven wrote:
MyOtheHedgeFox wrote:
Thank you for describing it. =) Have not seen it in the articles, however: from my search it seems that Bernard Lewis is the person most quoted saying that: others are just using something more literal to describe it, that's why I had troubles interpreting the meaning. Heh. =) Will try to pick an appropriately politically veiled term in Russian for it.
It was a tactic used in Soviet Russia, and inspired the term "two minute hate". You direct energies away from you towards (and often fictitious) enemy.


I'm not so sure about it being a tactic actively employed in Russia. But as a term it dates back further than that. It was used in the Great War as part of British propaganda/satire of Germans.
You mean like not blaming Troskey on the failures?
 
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MyOtheHedgeFox wrote:
In Russia, we usually say "scapegoat" (козёл отпущения): something much more rude in its expression, something that Khruschev might say without beating an eyelid and resorting to a shoeheel instead. (chuckle)

In English, scapegoat implies blaming a specific person or group for something. Licensed grievance, while not a standard term per se, implies an officially or at least socially accepted thing to complain about.
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whac3 wrote:
MyOtheHedgeFox wrote:
In Russia, we usually say "scapegoat" (козёл отпущения): something much more rude in its expression, something that Khruschev might say without beating an eyelid and resorting to a shoeheel instead. (chuckle)

In English, scapegoat implies blaming a specific person or group for something. Licensed grievance, while not a standard term per se, implies an officially or at least socially accepted thing to complain about.


This seems to describe it best. Any group, clique, nation, whatever will have straw men for the rabble to bat at. Israel in the Middle East, The French for the rest of Europe, or, in RSP, the licensed grievance would be anyone who is not in total agreement with the prevailing view of "social justice" in this small left-leaning clique. It doesn't mean anything, it's just a nearby dog to kick.

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Чебурашка, ты настоящий друг!
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What translation did you go for?
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MyO the HedgeFox
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Decided for a descriptive one: "разрешённая отдушина для гнева" (literally: sanctioned target for outrage). Not the best one definitely, but seems to convey the meaning better as I grasp it now, and is more polite.

Still not sure about it, nevertheless.
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James King
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MyOtheHedgeFox wrote:
Hello!

Could you please help with a translation of a specific political term?

In a text, the author uses a term "licensed grievance" while describing Bernard Lewis' position about the events that took place there, and quotes the context from a Pew interview:


Quote:
ne of them is that Israel is an open society, and therefore journalists can come and go and report and mis-report freely, which is not true in the other places I mentioned, and that makes it very much easier for them to get media attention. The other thing is that Jews are involved. And you know the old saying, Jews are news. For much of the Middle-Eastern Arab world, Israel is a very useful topic. It is the licensed grievance. There is a pent-up rage in all these countries directed primarily against their own rulers, and therefore rulers make every effort they can to deflect it elsewhere. It surely is the “licensed” grievance and serves a very useful purpose in that respect. If that grievance were ever resolved they would have to find a new one, which would be a lot of trouble.


Could you please help me translate the term? How should it be interpreted?

It's referring to the time-dishonored practice of Arab leaders' using Jews as convenient scapegoats to blame for their countries' problems in order to distract their respective populace's away from the actual internal problems that their leaders themselves may have helped foment or allowed to occur. In that respect, scapegoating over time became an "acceptable" practice (i.e. license) to use Jews as the boogeymen to which all or most of their troubles may be blamed.

You're probably heard of Poetic License before. Well, this is referring to what might be called Despotic License.


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Чебурашка, ты настоящий друг!
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MyOtheHedgeFox wrote:
Decided for a descriptive one: "разрешённая отдушина для гнева" (literally: sanctioned target for outrage). Not the best one definitely, but seems to convey the meaning better as I grasp it now, and is more polite.

Still not sure about it, nevertheless.


I like it; I think when it doubt, be descriptive (the idea of "safety-valve" in отдушена also seems apt). I take it single word translations for grievance such as обида or недовольвсто, on the one hand, or жалоба or претензия, on the other, don't work?
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MyO the HedgeFox
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This is why I asked -- "grievance" is a word too mild to convey the actual meaning of the word combination as you described!

Обида -- something unvoiced, NOT something to yell about all the time.
Недовольство -- suitable, but rather mild. Does not need a safety valve.
Жалоба -- complaint, NOT something to complain of.
Претензия -- official complaint, official claim, NOT something to yell at, the talk-show way.
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Чебурашка, ты настоящий друг!
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MyOtheHedgeFox wrote:
This is why I asked -- "grievance" is a word too mild to convey the actual meaning of the word combination as you described!

Обида -- something unvoiced, NOT something to yell about all the time.
Недовольство -- suitable, but rather mild. Does not need a safety valve.
Жалоба -- complaint, NOT something to complain of.
Претензия -- official complaint, official claim, NOT something to yell at, the talk-show way.


I was wondering whether the last one would have worked, tying in with the idea that this was an official avenue for lodging complaint. Certainly, I've heard it used in a broader sense: my ex used to ask me accusingly "Почему у тебя есть претензии ко мне?" (or something like that).
 
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Isaac Citrom
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MyOtheHedgeFox wrote:
This is why I asked -- "grievance" is a word too mild to convey the actual meaning of the word combination as you described!

Обида -- something unvoiced, NOT something to yell about all the time.
Недовольство -- suitable, but rather mild. Does not need a safety valve.
Жалоба -- complaint, NOT something to complain of.
Претензия -- official complaint, official claim, NOT something to yell at, the talk-show way.


It's somewhat facetious in its connotation. In other words, anti-Semitic and hyper-criticality of Jews and Israel is officially frowned upon to no degree or some degree in the various Islamic states, but only officially. In those societies, this is not taken nearly as seriously as such anti-social behaviour in the West, though granted it exists.

It's no biggie; it's a commonly accepted "grievance."
.
 
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MyO the HedgeFox
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Salo sila wrote:
MyOtheHedgeFox wrote:
This is why I asked -- "grievance" is a word too mild to convey the actual meaning of the word combination as you described!

Обида -- something unvoiced, NOT something to yell about all the time.
Недовольство -- suitable, but rather mild. Does not need a safety valve.
Жалоба -- complaint, NOT something to complain of.
Претензия -- official complaint, official claim, NOT something to yell at, the talk-show way.


I was wondering whether the last one would have worked, tying in with the idea that this was an official avenue for lodging complaint. Certainly, I've heard it used in a broader sense: my ex used to ask me accusingly "Почему у тебя есть претензии ко мне?" (or something like that).
More likely "У тебя есть претензии ко мне?" Intended to invoke an air of dryness and officiose mood. "We are not amused" is quite close. =)
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