Recommend
3 
 Thumb up
 Hide
5 Posts

Ticket to Ride» Forums » Reviews

Subject: Ticket to Ride Review and Suggestions for Younger Players rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
JP LaChance
United States
Madison
Wisconsin
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Review of Ticket to Ride By JP LaChance

Theme of the game:
You are playing a railroad manager who is trying to complete train routes around the USA to earn victory points.

The Board
The game board is a beautiful map of the North America, the US and Canada. There are major cities in each region of the board.

Instructions
The instructions were very well written and had a are illustrated to show board setup.

The gameplay
Learning this game takes about 5-10 minutes tops. A player’s turn consists one of three actions:
1)draw cards
2)play cards from your hand to trains on the board
3)select more destination cards, draw three and keep a minimum of one card.

What makes this game great is the tension that is created by only being able to do one of the prior three actions.
These are the questions you will be forced to ask yourself each and every turn:

1)Will drawing more cards into your hand mean that you will miss out on a much needed rail path between two cities?

2)Do you want to pick up that one wild card you see in the face-up card cue instead of selection two unknown cards from the face down draw pile?

3)Will selection of the two same color cards from the face-up cue give away your next move?

4)You just watched the player to your right pick up two cards of the same color and it looks like you two are going for the same route, should you use your wild cards now to block them?

5)Should I select some more destination cards and hope to pick up some free victory points for routes already completed?


The game play mechanic is simple but the decisions that are created are very difficult. Every time you complete a destination card you can count on those as being extra victory points at the end of the game…..but uncompleted destination cards cost you victory points at the end of the game. This game requires a player to control his greed while maximizing his resources.

Use with Younger Players
I believe this game could be played with a 5-6 yr old with out a problem. I think if you play open handed and limit the “destination cards” to one card per person the game is basically just drawing cards into you hand, and matching your color and number of cards to to place your trains onto the track. You should also remove the rule only one player on a double track with less than 4 players to allow the younger players to connect the most direct route. Another thing we did to start out when playing with our just turned 6yr old was to count the track placement as one point per car placed instead of the graduated scale in the rules

Who will like this game?
This is a perfect gateway game. Everyone loves trains. Game play is simple, the bits are beautiful, and the graphics are eye catching. This game was the Spiel des Jahres winner in 2004 which gives the game industry awards stamp of approval of for a perfect family game.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Gavin Wynford-Jones
France
Prévessin-Möens
Just across the border from Geneva, Switzerland
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Nice review and description.

To answer your questions:

1)Will drawing more cards into your hand mean that you will miss out on a much needed rail path between two cities?

If you can make the route, play it, otherwise draw.

2)Do you want to pick up that one wild card you see in the face-up card cue instead of selection two unknown cards from the face down draw pile?

Probably a good idea - they're always useful.

3)Will selection of the two same color cards from the face-up cue give away your next move?

Not if you're preparing two routes at the same time. Eggs in one basket and all that...

4)You just watched the player to your right pick up two cards of the same color and it looks like you two are going for the same route, should you use your wild cards now to block them?

Definitely. He has a greater chance of getting the cards he needs than you. (He can pick up cards left by other players, you can't.)

5)Should I select some more destination cards and hope to pick up some free victory points for routes already completed?

Once you've got a good network, yes. The chances are pretty good you'll pick up something you can score with, otherwise just take the smallest loss.

Having answered your questions, you may be surprised to discover that I find this game to be about as exciting as cold porridge. With five face up stacks to choose from, plus one face down, plus wildcards, it's just a very basic set collecting game in which you have almost perfect knowledge. As a family game, however, with youngish children, it probably works well. (Which is no doubt why it won the SdJ.)

Gavin
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
PaulW
United States
Warrington
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
custom golf clubs wrote:
Use with Younger Players
I believe this game could be played with a 5-6 yr old with out a problem. I think if you play open handed and limit the “destination cards” to one card per person the game is basically just drawing cards into you hand, and matching your color and number of cards to to place your trains onto the track. You should also remove the rule only one player on a double track with less than 4 players to allow the younger players to connect the most direct route. Another thing we did to start out when playing with our just turned 6yr old was to count the track placement as one point per car placed instead of the graduated scale in the rules


Just to share what I have found in teaching my oldest son (5 1/2 some Eurogames)...

My son was able to 'play' TtR when he turned 5. As you imply, the key is to scale back the rules and then feed them more rules every few games. Here is what I did:

First 3 games (or so): Let them play with the pieces, period. The pieces are cool, they are going to want to fiddle with them. Let them get it out of their system. Don't try any rules.

Next: No Destination cards, players can use double tracks. Goal: Let them get used to the rules around drawing cards, building a route and scoring points on the scale. After two games my son looked me and said 'Dad, there MUST be more rules then this...'

Next: Destination Cards. Now this is really hard for young kids on a number of levels. They need: Some skill level of being able to read a map (to find the city), reading (or at least can match the city names on the map to what is on the card) and planning (when using more then one D-Card).

I started by not counting D-Cards as negitive if they don't finish them. Give them one card and help them figure out where on the map the cities are located and put a marker on them and play from there. As they get better at it, work on giving them more then one route and still mark them on the board.

My son is 5 1/2 now and can read the map now quickly and play multipule routes (marked on the board). I will likely try to take away the markers next time and then restrict the routes later on and he's fully got it!

Just a few other notes for others who might want to try teaching our hobby to our kids:

1) THEME is very important. Had this been cars instead of trains, my son likely wouldn't have cared enough to get this far. Using a theme they like is a great tool to get them to learn.

2) Every kid is different, so odds are you have to take a different path to get them to learn the rules. Don't forget that many of these games we play are for ages 8+ It may take years until they get the full game and play well. The goal is to have fun and learn a bit. You will likely know when you can try to expand the ruleset.

3) Let them win more times then not. Clearly at this level (pre-K when we started) we can smoke the kids. Crush them each game and they are not going to want to play. Just like with the ruleset, you need to scale back the game play to what they can handle.

We have just started on Carcassonne, as well. For now, we are not playing with any point system or turns. I'm giving him the pieces and letting him put them together like a puzzle. However, I'm pointing out any mistakes in tile placement as he goes. River must go in one direction (flow downhill), roads can't end in the middle of the city (where did the road go?), etc. He loves it.

After two times 'playing', he fully understands tile placement. When he seems open to the idea (when the coolness of the pieces starts to fade a bit), we will start on some meeple placement and a simple scoring system to turn it more into a game.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Gavin Wynford-Jones
France
Prévessin-Möens
Just across the border from Geneva, Switzerland
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Paul, that's worth doing as a Wiki entry so more folks can see it! Grab 'em while they're young.

Gavin
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ryan Goodwin
United States
Grayslake
Illinois
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmb
gavingva wrote:
Nice review and description.

To answer your questions:

1)Will drawing more cards into your hand mean that you will miss out on a much needed rail path between two cities?

If you can make the route, play it, otherwise draw.

2)Do you want to pick up that one wild card you see in the face-up card cue instead of selection two unknown cards from the face down draw pile?

Probably a good idea - they're always useful.

3)Will selection of the two same color cards from the face-up cue give away your next move?

Not if you're preparing two routes at the same time. Eggs in one basket and all that...

4)You just watched the player to your right pick up two cards of the same color and it looks like you two are going for the same route, should you use your wild cards now to block them?

Definitely. He has a greater chance of getting the cards he needs than you. (He can pick up cards left by other players, you can't.)

5)Should I select some more destination cards and hope to pick up some free victory points for routes already completed?

Once you've got a good network, yes. The chances are pretty good you'll pick up something you can score with, otherwise just take the smallest loss.

Having answered your questions, you may be surprised to discover that I find this game to be about as exciting as cold porridge. With five face up stacks to choose from, plus one face down, plus wildcards, it's just a very basic set collecting game in which you have almost perfect knowledge. As a family game, however, with youngish children, it probably works well. (Which is no doubt why it won the SdJ.)

Gavin

If you alway follow your guidelines above, I would imagine you would find the game boring. I would as imagine, if you do follow your guidelines and played someone that knows what they are doing, you'll get your hat handed to you.

Think the answer to all 5 of the questions above is 'It depends.'

It depends on what cards are left in the deck, what cards you oppenents have drawn, what cards you have in your hand, what destination tickets you have, what destination tickets you think your oppenents have. It all depends.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.