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1914: Glory's End / When Eagles Fight» Forums » Rules

Subject: Zones of Control rss

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Piotr Bambot
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Why in the WEF and 1914 GE, as in other hex games, there are no Zones of Control? So I can freely outflank the enemy corps in close proximity, without risk and any enemy reaction. It is a great convenience.
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Subatomic Birdicle
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Bambrough wrote:
Why in the WEF and 1914 GE, as in other hex games, there are no Zones of Control? So I can freely outflank the enemy corps in close proximity, without risk and any enemy reaction. It is a great convenience.


Most of the wargames I play have no, or weak, zones of control. I really dislike strong ZOCS - it's very unnatural to have stacks of units every three hexes, instead of a unit in every hex forming a line, which is what a real front looks like.

Real commanders were concerned with keeping a line. You should be too. When real armies can't maintain a line they fall back until they have secure flanks.

In terms of game design, ZOCs mean these scales:

- unit size
- space per hex
- time

have been chosen in such a way that a unit would really be in more than one hex at a time, or would have time to react to enemy movement nearby and intercept it in the course of a turn.

I prefer games with a unit, space, and time scale such that units do not occupy more than one hex, and are not able to interfere in enemy movement in adjacent hexes. They are a lot more mobile and look more realistic (actual lines instead of stacks with spaces between them).

OCS is an example of a popular hex game system with very weak ZOCs that have little to no effect on movement.
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James Elkins
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Richlands
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Also worth bearing in mind that ZOCs reflect things like tactical communication and mobility...for example, a picket reports enemy movement and triggers a response which interferes with that movement. Easy to imagine with WW2-era motorized, radio-equipped forces. But in the conflict(s) covered by these WW1 games, tactical communication is, at best, often horse-speed and mobility is largely walking-speed...in the time it takes our hypothetical picket to get word back of enemy movement and for the reaction force to arrive, the enemy movement is already well under way.
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