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Subject: Any Android Netrunner players that used to play MTG? rss

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John Doe
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Im curious if anyone who used to play MTG and now plays A:NR exclusively or plays both games.


Do you guys recommend Magic, and if yes or no, why? Ive heard good and bad things about it which I could list here but Im sure most people have already heard.

The biggest factor for me is probably the cost compared to FFGS LCGS atm, so I am holding off from getting into it until my income is higher.
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Scott Forster
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I used to play Magic. The last tournament deck I did well with cost more than my entire collection of Netrunner and X-Wing combined.

However, the deck before that was only about $40.00 worth of cards.

I sold off my collection years ago and used the proceeds to put a down payment on a house.

Then I got back in (and played the two decks above).

I have since sold it all off again.

I prefer the less user-hostile experience of non-random customizable games.

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Pascal Lefebvre
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Magic is a very interesting game, and it has been developed for so many years that the current products are very polished, with tons of viable strategies and such.

What I always suggest is to get some Prebuilt/Theme/Intro decks (the name have changed). For a specific set, you could get them all 5 for 50-60 dollars. Usually, those decks are fairly balanced between each other and offer a good layer of fun and diverse strategies between each other. Then, if you enjoyed this kind of experience, you can get into the tournament scene and start building your own decks.

While I did go for tournaments, I ended up enjoying casual play with a specific set of prebuilt decks more. If you can, look into acquiring the theme decks from Ravnica: City of Guild, Guildpack and Dissension. These 10 decks represent the 10 possible combinations of colors and are so wildly different that I'd say that they represent the 10 major archetypes in Magic deckbuilding. They're a little older now, and more difficult to find, but you can still get them online through ebay and stuff. And they're very fun, that I guarantee.
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Michael Thiel
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Amunra93 wrote:
Im curious if anyone who used to play MTG and now plays A:NR exclusively or plays both games.


Do you guys recommend Magic, and if yes or no, why? Ive heard good and bad things about it which I could list here but Im sure most people have already heard.

The biggest factor for me is probably the cost compared to FFGS LCGS atm, so I am holding off from getting into it until my income is higher.


I haven't played MTG in a pretty long time (the last time seriously was around Alara block) and I don't ever want to go back to it. Android Netrunner has that kind of amazing brain agony and puzzle feeling that you don't get in a lot of games. It's a game of bluffing and calculated risk taking. The asymmetrical play is also something I like a lot.

I feel like Magic you can get into scenarios where your plays are more obvious than they can be in Netrunner, because bluffing and second guessing are so important to the game. It leads to questioning myself. If I install this here, will he run? Can I trick him into running on an ambush, or should I try to sneak an agenda right now. What is that ice? Should I run on his remote or R&D? What did he discard into Archives. ANR's click economy means you're facing an optimization problem every turn.

Magic feels so rote in comparison. It's turn 2. I play this guy because he's my two drop. It's turn 3. That's not to say it's not a good game, or boring. I just feel like my brain is taxed more, more of the time in ANR. I like that.

Plus, Magic is too freaking expensive.
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Martin Presley
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Amunra93 wrote:
Im curious if anyone who used to play MTG and now plays A:NR exclusively or plays both games.


Do you guys recommend Magic, and if yes or no, why? Ive heard good and bad things about it which I could list here but Im sure most people have already heard.

The biggest factor for me is probably the cost compared to FFGS LCGS atm, so I am holding off from getting into it until my income is higher.


You can play draft for $12-ish, and it's lightyears ahead of ANR's draft. Both are fun games, and I think the difference is ANR has more inbuilt options and complexity, whereas Magic's complexity is more in the strategy, deckbuilding, and metagame. I recommend most gamers play Magic, because it's a very fun game with 22 years of polish, and if nothing else, it's massively historically important.

Magic is really just as expensive as you want to make it, and there are formats specifically designed to be casual and/or inexpensive. You don't have to jump in all at once either; a lot of players don't go on the Pro Tour and enjoy making budget brews or theme decks for their local scene, playing oddball formats, or just buying the preconstructed products and treating it more like a board game.

edit: oh, and Magic's rules consistency and amazing judges are big pluses too. Wizards employs people solely to be rules and templating experts, so the cards interact in a really clear, unambiguous way, and the judging program makes sure even the guy just running local events knows his stuff, and the pro judges are great people.
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Noose Cartwright
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For me there is no reason to play any card games except Netrunner, Both the community and the game are far better than anywhere else, it just makes other Games look like uncultured pre-teen trash.
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Micheal Keane
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hoobajoo wrote:
edit: oh, and Magic's rules consistency and amazing judges are big pluses too. Wizards employs people solely to be rules and templating experts, so the cards interact in a really clear, unambiguous way, and the judging program makes sure even the guy just running local events knows his stuff, and the pro judges are great people.


And all it takes is two decades, a few full-blown rules overhauls and a 300 page rulebook.
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Grish Noren
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I currently just draft Magic once every month to two months. If you're into fantasy theme and creatures "fighting" that's what its largely good at. I can't tell you whether you'll like the game. Ultimately it tends to be more expensive if you want to play competitively. And its higher variance than netrunner. A good player will ultimately succeed more often in netrunner than they will with Magic. I view this as a good thing. It makes Magic more approachable. Everyone has a chance. But it also means there are times your deck just defeats you.

Magic at the Kitchen Table is pretty awesome. That's where I always had the most fun. You weren't dealing with "crystalized" metas. Not everyone had all of the cards. And that meant a varied, fun, unpredictable metagame. It also means more situations along the lines of powershutdown->accelerated diagnostics. M:TG was mostly about who can break the game first at my Kitchen Table. Who can get their combo to stabilize and go off?

The game is far more deck-building oriented. You can still netdeck, but the true joy of the game is making something of your own. In a given pool of players you can likely do something unique to catch someone off guard.

But you know, here's Johnny (combo player).
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Zeb
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hoobajoo wrote:

You can play draft for $12-ish, and it's lightyears ahead of ANR's draft. Both are fun games, and I think the difference is ANR has more inbuilt options and complexity, whereas Magic's complexity is more in the strategy, deckbuilding, and metagame. I recommend most gamers play Magic, because it's a very fun game with 22 years of polish, and if nothing else, it's massively historically important.


Truth! Drafting is like a whole other game. Everyone studying game design should dedicate time to Magic.

hoobajoo wrote:
Magic is really just as expensive as you want to make it


Unless you're playing a constructed format where people have better cards than you. The price really depends on your playgroup and their preferred format.
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David Boeren
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The only reason to play Magic is to have a large active community and cash prizes. The game itself is compares poorly to any modern LCG both mechanically and with the random pack method of purchasing. We do owe Magic a great debt for being the groundbreaker and providing the example for newer games to learn from and improve on its mechanics but the state of the art has moved on.

If you're looking for another card game in addition to Netrunner, just see which other LCGs (plus Doomtown: Reloaded) appeal to you.
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Martin Presley
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Zebadiah wrote:

hoobajoo wrote:
Magic is really just as expensive as you want to make it


Unless you're playing a constructed format where people have better cards than you. The price really depends on your playgroup and their preferred format.


All I really meant was you don't have to play those formats. A lot of people will hear how much a legacy deck costs and are turned off by that, and I was just trying to say you don't have to play the expensive formats.
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Mr. Monkey
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I actively play both; and it really depends on the level of investment that you want to make.

A:NR costs (roughly) $10-$15 a month for the data packs plus an initial investment of a core set or two (or three), and allows you the flexibility to make virtually any deck that you can think of within the context of the current card pool. FFG is doing a good job of changing meta, which not only keeps the game interesting, but also their sales figures high. If you want to be ultra competitive in A:NR then you should probably get each data pack as it comes out and invest a good deal of time into knowing the cards. Other than that, if you are just playing for fun, then you can get releases on your own time-frame and you don't need to get everything if nothing in the pack looks like it would interest you. It's a very straight forward model and it's easy to understand the cost investment that you are getting into.

MtG on the other hand is a bit more complex in terms of investment cost, and it really boils down to 'how much' and 'at what level' you want to play. If you want to learn the game, have some fun with friends, and explore the game a bit...then it's very easy to do with a very small investment from each person (probably $15-$20 for starter-ish decks and whatnot). From there it can go a few ways. If you want to just play with your friends from then on, you can make reasonable decks and buy cards individually online quite cheaply...and you would only do that when you wanted to make a new deck. If you wanted something with a larger community, there are weekly drafts for about $15. There are pre-release and 'sealed' events (where you get a bunch of your own boosters and make the best decks you can on the spot) for $25-$30 at least every 3 months-ish. Then there is 'constructed' where you make your own deck and take it to play in a big tournament, the cost knowing no bounds.

Personally, I like sticking mostly to the drafts and sealed events. This way I keep my cost down but get to have the fun of playing competitively in the store. If I open some of the 'big money' cards in either my winnings or in the tournament itself, then I sell them to online vendors to cover the cost of playing. The only time I can really see cost becoming a large issue (if you are already getting A:NR regularly and are contemplating more) is if you want to be in the constructed play environment.

I would recommend playing MtG; it's been around for as long as it has for a reason. The initial investment can be very small, and involvement in the larger community can be very affordable. If you like it, then stick with it. If not, sell of what you have. MtG is a wildly deep rabbit hole that you can explore, with interesting game mechanics and years of refinement.

Also,
Zebadiah wrote:

Everyone studying game design should dedicate time to Magic.

is very true. There's a lot to learn from why and how the game has changed over the years!
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Erik Twice
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Amunra93 wrote:
Do you guys recommend Magic, and if yes or no, why?

That's a very difficult question even if you take recommendations lighter than I do.

As I see it, Magic: The Gathering is one of the best games ever made. But this is a distinction I award on the big, multifaceted artistical sense, because I also think that on a purely technical aspect, Magic is a flawed game. pure design than for their impact on the actual table.

Consider this, there's a card (Platinum angel) that says "You cannot lose the game and your opponents cannot win the game". Like that. It's amazing! "You cannot lose the game". A card in a game that prevents you from losing. That's beyond interesting, that's incredible and Magic is full of stuff like this and they mix and interact with each other for an even more powerful effect.

But sometimes this effect translated into the game in fairly simple terms like "Can I deal with this card? Y/N" which is not as interesting. And games go so quickly that, well, there's not that much in the way of meaninful decisions sometimes. The reality is that I conceding is frequent, decks frequently steamroll other decks in a rock-paper-scissors fashion and that luck, be it of draw, or matchup or whatever, really has a big impact on the game. I can win 95% of my matches in Netrunner if I have a good deck and I play well, that's not certainly not true of Magic.

And it's really expensive. Really, really, really expensive. It's now like three times more expensive than it was back when I played. The average competitive deck in Modern is like 1200$ and that's just a single deck which is beyond insane! For that price you could buy, not just a full Netrunner playset, but a whole library of games.

Really, Magic is great, but it's not incredible enough to overshadow every single other game I could recommend you put together.


There's a way to avoid this, though: Limited play. You get some boosters, roll them around and make a deck out of the cards you get. But even if it makes the game much longer, less swingy and keeps costs down to something reasonable it's not newbie-friendly at all so I cannot recommend it unless you have played the game in the first place.

So yeah, that's how I see it.
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Simon Gunkel
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General_Norris wrote:
The average competitive deck in Modern is like 1200$ and that's just a single deck which is beyond insane!


Not quite that much these days. Most of the decks that ended up in the Top 8 of the last modern Pro Tour are 3 digits. The main issue are the fetches and these have gone down a bit since the allied fetches got printed and since a return to Zendikar has been announced, it's not that unlikely that they will drop (alternatively they might get reprinted even sooner...).

How much power you give up in Burn if you drop one splash colors is up for debate, but that alone would bring the cost down considerably.

General_Norris wrote:
There's a way to avoid this, though: Limited play. You get some boosters, roll them around and make a deck out of the cards you get. But even if it makes the game much longer, less swingy and keeps costs down to something reasonable it's not newbie-friendly at all so I cannot recommend it unless you have played the game in the first place.

So yeah, that's how I see it.


That's what DotP is for - the 2014 version is pretty good (and 2016 will apparently be free to play). You get to play, with no large investment and the game teaches you the mechanics of Magic. There are some subtleties that get lost a bit, but it's clearly the way to learn the game unless you have somebody who knows it and wants to teach you.

Then I agree with everybody who said: Go for limited. There are lots of limited formats and they don't require you to buy expensive cards. From 2 player draft formats, through sealed to backdraft (always a favorite of mine) you get to play with a greater variety of cards than in constructed formats and it's not that rare to break even on a draft.

I would note that the luck factor in MT:G is not a downside. In every game 3 factors determine who wins to various degree:
1) Luck
2) Metagame decisions
3) In-game decisions
The shorter a game takes to play, the less important (3) is allowed to be without ruining the game. A game of Magic tends to take less than half the time a game of A:NR takes. Because it is shorter, it gets to place a bit more emphasis on luck and metagame decisions.
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Pascal Lefebvre
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What adds a lot to Magic is to play with a limited cardpool. When I got my Ravnica sets, I got a couple of boosters per deck and created wide but limited pool. I also got a couple of Duel Decks, and the 6 of them are fairly balanced with each other.

So what that did is that it limited the amount of tricks somebody can pull, and knowing your opponent's deck beforehand is possible. And that actually added a whole lot of decision making and resource management, and at this point, skill became that much more important in anticipating and dealing with threats.

So I wouldn't say that Magic is flawed, because it's rather the formats that do not give it justice.
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wanderingmystic
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hoobajoo wrote:
Zebadiah wrote:

hoobajoo wrote:
Magic is really just as expensive as you want to make it


Unless you're playing a constructed format where people have better cards than you. The price really depends on your playgroup and their preferred format.


All I really meant was you don't have to play those formats. A lot of people will hear how much a legacy deck costs and are turned off by that, and I was just trying to say you don't have to play the expensive formats.


I think this sums up Magic for me. You need to play the game that's going to make you happy, and if you can get that out of a $40 magic deck, that's great.
For me, I was never competitive enough in Magic for my liking. I wanted to really get into the nitty gritty of competitions, but as a high school kid I never had the money to really get into it. I played casually with my friends and bought occassional packs, but that was the limit of it.

Netrunner fits that slot for me much better. I'm an adult now and I have the expendable income, but not loads of it. Netrunner fits the price point I'm willing to pay without sacrificing the competitive scene I like.
It may not be as established as Magic, but it's the game that fits my wallet and competitive needs better. If Magic does that for you, keep playing Magic. For me, the game is Netrunner.
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Nate K
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Eh. I played Magic for years, mostly Draft formats with the occasional Standard or Extended tournament. I stopped because of temporary monetary issues, and I never went back because I found games I like more, especially Netrunner.
 
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Bret
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If you like Hearthstone but want something much better and more complex, then by all means play MTG.

However if you're already playing Netrunner then trying any other card game is just going downhill.
 
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Grebnol wrote:
However if you're already playing Netrunner then trying any other card game is just going downhill.


Not entirely true; When I go to Magic drafts these days I always have netrunner in my back pocket. I talk about how great a game it is and try and take a player off to the side between rounds to introduce it to him/her.

It's a great way to meet future netrunner players! :P
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Max Martina
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I got into MtG just after Beta and was in on the original Legends series, Antiquities, etc. I played for about three years with friends/brother - this was before that had formats and had mechanized their roll-out structure. A great game. About three years ago, I got back into and pulled out my old cards - never played draft. Given the power creep of new cards in the game, it meant upgrading the collection to have a few decks that were viable. Chasing cards has a certain thrill to it (if you're not buying specific cards online). Buying a $100 booster box for the latest series, for example, and then opening packs gives you that simple high of anticipation to discover the rare card (I think, like gambling - don't know, am not a gambler.)

There's no question most games are quicker than in ANR, and the mechanics can at times get complex and interactive (read "interesting"). Plus you can play with more than two people. The fantasy theme is fun too.

But frankly? ANR from a game design perspective is superior in my mind due to dual mechanics: actions (clicks) and credits. It allows for more variables and turns become less "automatic". Instead, the thrill of opening a booster pack in MTG (which certainly gets expensive) is replaced by the thrill of interactive live gaming in which the bluff and counterbluff is incredible. Piloting decks in ANR requires more skill than piloting decks in MtG (my opinion) and the luck factor is reduced substantially in ANR due to the potential for more frequent draws, a limit of three of any single card, and (often) smaller decks. The superior game design is one thing - but this translates into some fantastic interaction with your opponent in which - even during his/her turn, you're connected to the game and keen on his/her decisions.

Plus, the ANR theme is so connected and brilliant in its breadth and storyline, that imagining you're a jaded hacker or monolithic corporation in a dystopian future is easy to do. About the only (minor) drawback compared to MtG is that you really can only play with two people. But from a "fun" standpoint, dollar standpoint, game design standpoint, it's ANR hands down. Keep in mind MtG has little/no bluffing mechanic so transparency/secrecy is less in the mix in a game of MtG.

I still have my Magic Cards, and will save them as the gateway fix for getting my kids into card games (forget Yugioh!) but I haven't touched them since I learned the beauty and Art of ANR. My my bro visits, we play ANR. I agree with a previous poster who said you should get into MtG with a couple starter decks. If you only intend to play infrequently with a significant other and have little desire to expand your card collection, you'll be fine and have a reasonable amount of fun when games need to be short (e.g., 10-30 mins after you know the rules well.) But for a true game night? ANR hands down. Fortunately, there's space for both games in my cupboard, its just that ANR is the only one that gets played anymore. This is determined, in large part, by my play circle which is also relatively small. Good luck!
 
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I hate to post a link to another thread but I wrote a review that talks a lot about this. I insist you take a look at it, please.

https://boardgamegeek.com/thread/1156132/going-full-circle-m...
 
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Ronaldo wrote:
I hate to post a link to another thread but I wrote a review that talks a lot about this. I insist you take a look at it, please.

https://boardgamegeek.com/thread/1156132/going-full-circle-m...


I read your post, it's very interesting and well written but I can't help but notice something weird in there. It seems that you like Netrunner better than Magic but decided not to play it because it's harder to teach to other people. If you like a game, you play it and try to find ways to play it with others.

For example, I live in Leicester, where it's very difficult to find anyone playing Netrunner but it doesn't change my opinion on the game itself, I just need to find a way to expand my meta, that's on me, not FFG.
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Ronaldo wrote:
I hate to post a link to another thread but I wrote a review that talks a lot about this. I insist you take a look at it, please.

https://boardgamegeek.com/thread/1156132/going-full-circle-m...


I can think about 3 families that you could belong to, but I'm pretty sure you've got the legendary prodigy son on your hands from reading that link. I don't think I ever got to play with you or your son, but I've heard the tales.

Its unfortunate that that's been your experience with netrunner. It is a harder to approach game, and if you want to play competitively you'll probably only be able to do it at a store (or a playgroup you meet as such a store). For people who don't have time to build metas, magic is probably the more approachable, repeatable game.

Having played both I'm a bigger fan of netrunner, but I have the time to put into not just playing the game but building the player base of that game.

Interesting read.
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Aedrill wrote:
Ronaldo wrote:
I hate to post a link to another thread but I wrote a review that talks a lot about this. I insist you take a look at it, please.

https://boardgamegeek.com/thread/1156132/going-full-circle-m...


I read your post, it's very interesting and well written but I can't help but notice something weird in there. It seems that you like Netrunner better than Magic but decided not to play it because it's harder to teach to other people. If you like a game, you play it and try to find ways to play it with others.

For example, I live in Leicester, where it's very difficult to find anyone playing Netrunner but it doesn't change my opinion on the game itself, I just need to find a way to expand my meta, that's on me, not FFG.


It is much deeper than that. I like Netrunner but I like Magic much more. I think Lukas is a tremendous designer and I think that Netrunner does an incredible job conveying the theme. It is the number one customizable game at BGG for a reason. I find fascinating that the main win condition is not to just reduce life points. And, as you know, they didn't just call life points agenda points. It is in the gameplay, it is a lot cooler than that.

I am not going to knock or say negative things about Netrunner. It is excellent. Additionally, I had no problems in finding opponents at I'm Board. Great number of players in Madison and Wisconsin in general.

I don't think it is fair to try to make all the points that I made on my review here again. I don't think I can make it justice. Magic is my number one game for numerous reasons.

It is a lot easier to get friends and family playing Magic and this is very cool but that may just be icing on the cake.

I am thinking that one of the great achievements of Magic is that it is very easy to get into the game. The rules are simple. The first time you ever draw a hand, half of your cards are lands and each turn there are only one or two that you have enough mana to cast and you can just learn your hand and cards as you go. Since, as a beginner, your hand just dwindles away, this rhythm of a beginner's game is very easy to follow and it is still joyful to the vast majority people we have introduced the game to (everybody really).

On the other hand, the game and the gameplay is very deep. There is a wealth of source material out there and new elements arise every week. And, the skill level of the player makes a huge difference. When and where to use your removal spell or counter spell? What creatures to hold back for possible blocking or that you can't afford to lose? How to put enough creatures out without over committing? Playing around a possible board wipe. Playing around a combo. Sideboarding. Knowing when to aggressively Mulligan. Just to talk about the most basic decisions in the game.

Another excellent aspect of Magic is the wealth of formats. The game is what you want it to be. Kitchen table Magic is very cheap. We play casual decks against casual friends. If somebody brings or wants to borrow a Standard deck, I will pull out my B/W Warriors. It is not a tier one deck but it got me to a 3-4 at a real PTQ where there were 93 players, none of them casual. For a real challenge, play my son who went 5-2 on the same tournament (lost his win and in) with a R/W aggro.

Standard is the easiest and, in my opinion, best way to get into competitive Magic. I think FNM is one of the best experiences in gaming. You just get to play fascinating new people every week. It is not hard to get to an FNM level. It can be any format but most still seem to be Standard.

Net deck the cheapest one you can find. Usually a red deck wins. Or, bring an Event Deck to test the waters. Or buy 2 of the same event deck and make it more competitive by optimizing the deck. I love Magic at this casual competitive level but I also like going to the bigger tournaments even if I don't need to have a tier one deck. Although I could if I wanted to. Tier one decks don't need to be expensive, they may last you a while and will help you build your collection if it is what you want to do.

Standard can be complex if you want to play at the highest level as great players are coming up with new ideas every week, new ways to dominate or beat the meta. Understanding your deck and what to expect from other decks requires a great deal of skill.

At this point, I can't recommend anybody getting into Legacy. It is just way too expensive. I am not sure where the format is going. It is an attractive concept as there are multiple viable decks, the game is complex and, once you have the deck, the updates tend to be small. Lower upkeep if you will.

Currently, the format I am enjoying the most is Modern. Many cards I recognize since they were Standard when I started playing in 2012 during Avacyn Restored. I can only go to the store once or twice a month so I don't have to keep up with the weekly shifts in Standard. I have had my deck for a while and don't need to make significant changes.

Madison is a great place for Magic as well. A Madisonian won the most recent Grand Prix last week. Mox Mania has excellent players waiting to be challenged just about every day of the week.

On the other hand, a light competitive guy like myself can show up, have some fun and maybe even get lucky. The 2 most recent times I showed up for Modern, I went 3-1 (I was contemplated with a first round bye, to be fair). And, this week, I went 3-0-1, the first time I went there and didn't lose a match, all formats considered.

My deck is in the very low 3 digits. I like to play monowhite so I have a Modern Death and Taxes. It is not tier one but will put a fight and I am learning to have a plan to beat the most popular decks. Sometimes I beat Twin. This week I beat Affinity for the first time and the other time I had my first competitive win against Burn (Kor Firewalkers are great).

You don't need to spend much money to be really competitive in Modern either. After beating Burn, I learned that that guy (super nice college kid) and 7 of his friends, were bringing that exact deck that one of them brewed to a preliminary PTQ. The deck can't be too expensive. 4 of them top 8'ed in a 50-player tournament. One made it to the final. My son top 8'ed at a 50-person Modern Invitational Qualifier with a low 3 digits deck. I wouldn't say that this is cheap but about 1000 dollars cheaper than the number misquoted on a previous post. A fraction really.

The new people that you get to play every week just makes it seem that whatever bucket they store the Magic players in is bottomless. This week I played Scott whom I just get to play every other time I show up. But still, he had a Dredge deck this time which ultimately succumbed to Rest in Peace. Adam, a young physicist whom I had not played for about one year. He seems to have become a much more competitive player since then. Thankfully, instead of his Souls Sisters, he was trying a Tokens deck with Emrakuul (can't spell its name) which did not work that night.

I played 2 extremely nice guys that I hadn't played before. Chris was also playing Death and Taxes but a green/white version and he also went 3-0-1 for the night and Sam who brought Affinity losing games 2 and 3 on our match due to early Stony Silence.

It is also great to see familiar faces. Andy, who wasn't playing, decided to follow my matches and it was funny when my son (who was playing another format) asked him "how does my dad win?". "He plays a Blade Splicer then he plays FlickerWisp and you know what happens after that".

Magic is easy to get in but provides complex gameplay. Each format has a cost which can vary from quite cheap to very expensive but there are enough of them that you are bound to find what you are hoping for. It is insanely popular so you can just play at home with the people you love or you can get out to play with people that you come to love (maybe not).


 
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Steven Tu
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Most people I know playing ANR are people who got tired of Magic.
 
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