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Subject: horse sandwich! rss

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Gert Corthout
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As I was enjoying my horse sandwich during lunch my collegue (from Singapore) asked me what meat I was eating. I kindly responded: "Horse, of course." After which he looked at me like I chewing on his mothers leg. They eat dogs and cats over there but not horse?
Then it occured to me that while abroad I've never really seen horse meat anywhere...
So are the belgians (and dutch) the only horse-eaters in the world? Surely other nationalities like this delicious meaty treat as well!
 
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Dave Serrette
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You know...I was wondering this same thing myself. Only I was wondering why we don't eat horse. I was walking through the Piggly Wiggly the other day and saw neatly packaged pig feet, and it made me wonder. I've eaten lots of strange stuff, but never horse.

I guess we will never know. Horse seems like it would be good.
 
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Geoff Bohrer
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So THAT'S what that might have been!

In Germany, my outfit went into the field with other NATO allies fairly often, being assigned to NORTHAG rather than CENTAG. On one occasion, we found ourselves issued Dutch rations (presumably, the Dutch infantry we were teamed with were eating MRE'S, and in 1987, were welcome to 'em). In general, it was a welcome change, with some serious chocolate bars, REALLY good cheeses, and other tasty morsels. (Plus it came with these really cool little folding stoves, which became prized possessions. I still haveone somewhere...this was before the chemical heaters were issued with MRE's.) BUT...

There was that meat paste. Pretty lean, but DEFINITELY not corn-fed beef; nor pork. We debated amongst ourselves whether it was rabbit or venison; the taste wasn't right for either (we ate a LOT of rabbit in our garrison mess halls), but was as close as we could come. But now I wnder...could it have been horse?
 
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Uffe
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When I was younger I used to believe that the expression "I'm so hungry I could eat a horse" meant that someone could imagine to eat something disgusting because of being extremely hungry but it probably refers to the quantity of eating an entire horse.

Here it's not too uncommon to have slices of horse meat on a sandwich (I'm not a big fan myself) but I don't know how common it is to eat horse meat steaks.
 
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Gert Corthout
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gbohrer wrote:
So THAT'S what that might have been!

In Germany, my outfit went into the field with other NATO allies fairly often, being assigned to NORTHAG rather than CENTAG. On one occasion, we found ourselves issued Dutch rations (presumably, the Dutch infantry we were teamed with were eating MRE'S, and in 1987, were welcome to 'em). In general, it was a welcome change, with some serious chocolate bars, REALLY good cheeses, and other tasty morsels. (Plus it came with these really cool little folding stoves, which became prized possessions. I still haveone somewhere...this was before the chemical heaters were issued with MRE's.) BUT...

There was that meat paste. Pretty lean, but DEFINITELY not corn-fed beef; nor pork. We debated amongst ourselves whether it was rabbit or venison; the taste wasn't right for either (we ate a LOT of rabbit in our garrison mess halls), but was as close as we could come. But now I wnder...could it have been horse?

Could have been. It's rather hard to describe because to me, it tastes like horse, no other way to put it. The meat is very dark red and you can see little white "veins" (they're not actually veins, but they look like it). It has a rather sweet taste and often also a bit salty (but I think the salt is added later for preservation). The meat is indeed very fatless/lean and should be very healthy.
 
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Gert Corthout
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Burzum wrote:

Here it's not too uncommon to have slices of horse meat on a sandwich (I'm not a big fan myself) but I don't know how common it is to eat horse meat steaks.

We eat horse steak as well but I prefer beef as horse steak is "stringy".
 
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Geoff Bohrer
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gert_c wrote:

Could have been. It's rather hard to describe because to me, it tastes like horse, no other way to put it. The meat is very dark red and you can see little white "veins" (they're not actually veins, but they look like it). It has a rather sweet taste and often also a bit salty (but I think the salt is added later for preservation). The meat is indeed very fatless/lean and should be very healthy.


Could well have been, then. We pretty much thought (or I did, anyway) that the sweetish flavor came from the spices in the paste (almost tasted like it was made with just a touch of cinnamon or allspice, as well as salt and white pepper). Many of us ate it though, and it certainly tasted all right...just unaccustomed, was all.

Whatever else may be said about European armies...I never saw a one that didn't feed better than the US did.
 
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In Costa Rica you can sometimes find horse meat at the butcher. It's generally recognized as being the cheapest meat you can get and nowhere near as good as a nice cut of beef.

There's also a heavy "ewww horse" stigma. But, like I said, you can find it so it's safe to assume that SOMEONE eats it.
 
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Olivier Lamontagne
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Horse meat is sold in Canada, at least in Quebec. It disgust many people.

Personnally I prefer it to many other meat.
 
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JessA
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That's MRS. McFoxFace to you!
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Well, you learn something new everyday!

 
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Joseph Cardarelli
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I'll have to try it. I enjoy eating things that other people find digusting or wrong.

But would I ever eat....man....?
 
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Philip Thomas
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UK residents aren't very keen on horse as a course. Actually there was quite a controversy about horse exports on the Common Market, UK horse-people worrying that their horses would be turned into food over on the continent. I can't remember what happened on that one.

Any good boardgames about the horsemeat trade?
 
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M G
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I believe that part of the stigma may be because of the inherent closeness that horses had to people in everyday life (being at one time the only viable transportation). Cattle, and other animals, were close too, but they were raised specifically as foodstuffs. The horse was more akin to a pet, like the cat and dog; it’s not generally seen as cool to eat a pet.

However, regardless, horse sandwich is funny to say.

Horse Sandwich!
 
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Philip Thomas
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I'm guessing you do eat, man, cos like, man, if you didn't you'd be dead.
 
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I'm free-basing midichloriens and the force is, like, an energy that connects and penetrates us all, man.
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*Sing it with me, wont you?*

O, A horse is a horse, of course of course,
and no one should eat a horse of course,
unless of course,
the horse of course,
is on a horse sand-wich!

...the mere suggestion of eating horse here in the midwest (USA) would be met with not only a disgusted sort of reaction, but an actually aggressive response, the equivalent reaction of saying: "Hi, I just ate your grandmother on sliced bread".

I've often noticed that most non-midwestern Americans turn their lip when I tell them squirrel tastes a bit like gamy chicken.

And every year the Veterans-of-Foreign-Wars organization has their 'Coon dinner': they serve up hundreds of pounds of wild raccoon.
 
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Jon
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I remember a news story from a few years ago. A few years ago, the US legalized the slaughter of horses for meat.
 
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Scott A. Reed
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dreadpirate wrote:

I've often noticed that most non-midwestern Americans turn their lip when I tell them squirrel tastes a bit like gamy chicken.

And every year the Veterans-of-Foreign-Wars organization has their 'Coon dinner': they serve up hundreds of pounds of wild raccoon.


A quick comment and an anecdote:

Comment: I would be interested in preparing and eating squirrel, but after my experience in de-boning a rabbit that had already been cleaned, I don't know if I would care to work through the minutiae of a squirrel. I have a cookbook with some squirrel recipes, but all it says about cleaning them is that they have some glands that have to be removed to make them less-gamey. Since I don't know exactly where those glands are, I'm not going to risk it. That being said, I would also have to prepare it sometime without my wife at home, as she wouldn't have any part of it (I prepared the rabbit while she was away, as it would have skeeved her out as well).

Anecdote: Long ago when my father used to hunt, he caught and cleaned a rabbit and put it in his cousin's freezer. Sometime later when he retrieved the it from the freezer and prepared it, he found it exceptionally greasy and gamey. Only when later consulting with his cousin did he find that he had not in-fact retrieved his rabbit from the freezer, but rather one of his cousin's cleaned-and-frozen raccoons.
 
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Gert Corthout
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Oh yeah, if you're ever in Belgium and see "Waterkonijn" (translates to Water Rabbit) on the menu, pass it by, it's actually rat meat. gulp
 
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Dave Serrette
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gert_c wrote:
Oh yeah, if you're ever in Belgium and see "Waterkonijn" (translates to Water Rabbit) on the menu, pass it by, it's actually rat meat. gulp

Long as they are farm raised rats, I don't see the big deal. Long as they aren't sewer rats and all dirty with viruses and bacteria and germs and stuff.

Unless of course it's just bad. But I'd give it a shot anyway. I'll try anything once. Maybe even twice if I like it.

Horse is now pretty high on the list of foods to try.

dreadpirate wrote:

I've often noticed that most non-midwestern Americans turn their lip when I tell them squirrel tastes a bit like gamy chicken.

And every year the Veterans-of-Foreign-Wars organization has their 'Coon dinner': they serve up hundreds of pounds of wild raccoon.


Add the south to the list of those that won't turn their nose. I like squirrel. I like raccon too. Not my favorites, but not bad. I've eaten just about anything you can find in the local forests. Sqirrel, coon, wild turkey, boar, deer, bear, not to mention all the birds I've eaten. You name it, I've probably eaten it.
 
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