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Subject: Another Dream goes up in Smoke rss

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Matt
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That's my perp! Futsie, all right - crazy as a coot! He's got to be stopped!
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Prosperity by Reiner Knizia and Sebastian Bleasdale casts you up as the leader of an expanding industrial nation. The game progresses through seven decades from 1970 to 2030 and has you investing in the infrastructure of industry whilst battling against pollution and environmental disaster.

Personally leading a country through seven decades sounds too much hard work. To put this into perspective Fidel Castro managed only 52 years and Kim Il-sung a mere 45 years.

At the beginning of each turn a player draws a tile and everyone resolves the tiles highlighted symbol. These symbols include energy, ecology, capital, research and prosperity and provide benefits or penalties depending on your current ratings. For instance if the ecology event is drawn then players with high ecology ratings can decrease their pollution levels, whereas players with low ecology levels have to increase their pollution.

Once the turn’s event has been resolved the active player takes two actions, you can take money, reduce pollution, improve research or buy and place a tile. The cost of the tile is €100, plus an additional €100 for each level that the tile is of a higher rating then your research.

Players place purchased tiles on their individual player boards in the appropriate coloured zone; you can demolish a building and place another in its place. Some building spaces will be unavailable until you build a transport link.

At first glance and rather unusually for a Knizia game Prosperity has a solid theme. The idea of balancing development with environmental sustainability works well. The progress through the decades, with new technologies becoming available also fits the theme nicely. Unfortunately, I found it all rather repetitive, a bit dry, and lacking in replay value.

Having to keep recalculating your various levels every time you place a new building is a bit of a pain at first, but soon becomes second nature, even if you mess up it is easy to do a quick check and make adjustments. Overall the game is easy to understand and has a nice flow that is only hampered by the appalling score track. You grab a tile which triggers a quick scoring round, carry out two quick actions and then it’s on to the next player.

Since a scoring event tile of each type will be drawn randomly at some point during each decade you are somewhat vulnerable to fortune, especially at the start of each decade. However, this also creates a neat risk management element to the game, as you think, “I really want that new power plant but it will reduce my ecology and ecology has yet to be scored this decade. ”

The only real interaction in Prosperity is grabbing a tile before anyone else, players have their own little board and go about their business in blissful isolation. From the moment that you start playing the game feels just too overfamiliar. There is little variety in the gameplay, the same tiles are introduced at the same time game after game, players start every game with the same set up, and the same scoring tiles come up every decade.

Fidel Castro ruled for five decades, whereas Prosperity struggles to maintain support for five games.

Here is a list of all my reviews, some with puns that I really should be ashamed of.

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David G. Cox Esq.
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Stalin ruled for a little over thirty years. Amongst other things he had the composer Prokofiev imprisoned for composing music that was too intellectual. After having seen one of Prokofiev's ballets, I support Stalin's action.

I see this game as too intellectual. It is too mathy and has no soul.

I'm sure that if there is a just god there is a special corner in hell reserved for the designers of soulless games. If there is justice they will have only one game to play throughout the rest of eternity and that will be Prosperity.


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David desJardins
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Futsie wrote:
Prosperity by Reiner Knizia and Sebastian Bleasdale casts you up as the leader of an expanding industrial nation. The game progresses through seven decades from 1970 to 2030 and has you investing in the infrastructure of industry whilst battling against pollution and environmental disaster.


That sounds like six decades.
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Felix Rodriguez
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Some people love 'soulless' euros. I'm glad they still make them. For others, there's other games out there.

Great review though. I've played it three times and still looking for more, but I can definitely see your points and curious if I will also burn out, three more plays from now.
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Jon Ben
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DaviddesJ wrote:
Futsie wrote:
Prosperity by Reiner Knizia and Sebastian Bleasdale casts you up as the leader of an expanding industrial nation. The game progresses through seven decades from 1970 to 2030 and has you investing in the infrastructure of industry whilst battling against pollution and environmental disaster.


That sounds like six decades.


Don't forget to listen to 2030, it's a decade too.
 
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David desJardins
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2030 is a decade? Is Thursday a year? shake
 
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Jon Ben
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I like the game. It is very fast to play and presents some painful choices. The theme does work extremely well but the game still doesn't feel very thematic.

The score tracks are absurd. Why are they counter to function, and why are there 4 of them? It baffles the mind. We use coins from another game when playing to track score, and cover the score tracks with the rulebook so that the back of the rulebook is on display which shows all the tiles. We also place a pollution marker on each rulebook image within a decade as those tiles get drawn. That way you can see at a glance what is left to come this decade.

And don't even get me started on the horrid gradient-fill backgrounds for all the tiles!

Despite the missteps in production the game is solid. Well worth a few plays, especially on the difficult side of the player boards.
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Jon Ben
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DaviddesJ wrote:
2030 is a decade? Is Thursday a year? shake


The decade beginning with 2030. Geeze, cooperative principle much?
 
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David desJardins
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If the game only runs to 2030, then it doesn't include (much at all of) the decade beginning with 2030.

I looked up the "cooperative principle" and it seems to involve furthering the purpose of the conversation, but I don't understand what purpose you're trying to further. I just pointed out a minor error in the OP.
 
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Jon Ben
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The game has tiles which represent each decade. The tiles are labelled after the first year in each decade. Those years include 1970 + 10x for x=[0,1,2,3,4,5,6]. That is a total of 7 decades.

As for the cooperative principle you seemed to go out of your way to misunderstand my previous post which tried to communicate that the decade starting in 2030 is included in the game. I admit what I said is technically incorrect.
 
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David desJardins
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OK, I haven't played the game so I looked at the rules. It seems that the game refers to each of 1970, 1980, ..., 2030 as a "decade". As far as I can see, the rules are not clear whether "2030" is supposed to represent the period 2021-2030, or 2030-2039, or 2025-2034, or something else. It's probably not precise enough to be any specific one of these.
 
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Christopher Dearlove
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JonBen wrote:
Well worth a few plays, especially on the difficult side of the player boards.


I can't imagine anyone here should ever play on the easier side. I never have (and that includes playtesting - though obviously someone did).

As for the decades, there are seven. Just to confuse someone even more, the seventh is slightly longer.

As for the artwork, I admit I initially preferred the starkly functional playtest tiles. But the published ones have grown on me. But someone here published an overlay score track and space to mark tiles gone from this decade. I'm still too lazy to have downloaded and printed it, but I will, it looks definitely better.

Finally, I prefer it with three than with four. I haven't played with two.
 
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Christopher Dearlove
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DaviddesJ wrote:
OK, I haven't played the game so I looked at the rules. It seems that the game refers to each of 1970, 1980, ..., 2030 as a "decade". As far as I can see, the rules are not clear whether "2030" is supposed to represent the period 2021-2030, or 2030-2039, or 2025-2034, or something else. It's probably not precise enough to be any specific one of these.


It certainly isn't. OK you could look at the seven different artistic styles of the numbers. Or you could look at the names of tiles. But neither will te you, and it's really not important. It's not a pasted on theme (definitely) but it is a classic Knizia abstraction of the theme, and that these are even decades isn't really important.
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-matt s.
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DaviddesJ wrote:
If the game only runs to 2030, then it doesn't include (much at all of) the decade beginning with 2030.

I looked up the "cooperative principle" and it seems to involve furthering the purpose of the conversation, but I don't understand what purpose you're trying to further. I just pointed out a minor error in the OP.


Each decade in the game is represented by 7 sets of tiles which are labelled 1970, 1980, 1990, 2000, 2010, 2020 and 2030. Therefore, there are 7 decades covered in the game (i.e. 7 rounds). The year simply indicates that particular decade. I think that is what the OP was trying to get across since you don't count the specific years during each 'decade'
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David B
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Knizia is my favorite designer but this game was garbage.
 
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Laszlo Molnar
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This game is clearly to be played on the more difficult side by any gamers. For non-gamers it was fine on the other side as well, but gamers, just forget that one.

And yes, 3-player works best.
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