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Subject: The War of the Rebellion. rss

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Jeremy Fridy
United States
Kent
Ohio
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I've owned and loved the game since the first edition. The new edition is really nice, with some good optional rules and much nicer looking components, just the clearer map alone is great. So I also have some experience, and am known for my willingness to play the US, while most of my friends love those southern generals with those easy activation numbers and good combat ratings.

So on with the (sadly shortened war.) I got the Union. Opening hand had 2 minor campaigns and the black recruits card. GOOD OPENING!

1861

The White House prepared for war. Lincoln recieved Frederick Douglas, who once again offered thousands of freedmen who could end the war quickly and destroy the entire basis of the slave system in the south. After speaking for over 2 hours, Lincoln prepared for bed, praying for guidance. The next morning, he spoke to his cabinet, and after much heated debate, the decree for black recruits was issued. The swell of blacks from across the North was massive, almost doubling the strength of the Army of the Patomac, and soon the Union army was able to threaten the Confederate forces in Manassas with a force 3 times the Southern Army's size.

The Confederates stalled for time, and riots broke out in Baltimore. The Union detached troops to occupy Baltimore and then marched the Army of the Patomac south. The Confederates withdrew, falling back to Fredericksburg, and then fighting a furious defense. The Union troops, though numerous and inspired, fought in a peacemail method, and failed to gain ground. Losses were heavy for both sides, but the South quickly poured more troops in, trying to hold back the huge blue tide. This would create the situation that would exist for the next 18 months in Virginia; the South holding fortified areas guarding Richmond, and trying to fill an an army under constant threat with replacements while the North slowly took over northern and western Virginia.

In Missouri, chaos reigned. Missouri began to break in two, with the Confederates advancing on St. Louis and Guerrilla bands began to launch raids across the state. The Union formed forces in St. Louis under General Fremont, the armies of the west crashed into each other. As 1861 dragged on, the Union could not crush the CSA forces, though the CSA was too weak to strike back. General Kirby Smith became the first General casualty of the War when his force was crushed by General Butlers wing of the drive. By October 1861, Missouri was firmly under Northern Control, but the southern border was the home of General Nathan Bedford Forrests raiders, and seemed impossible to catch. Guerrilla forces burned Lawrence, Kansas, and Northern will grew stronger in response to the atrocity.

Along the Ohio River, Kentucky began to lean South quickly, and the Union built forts in Cairo and Cincinatti to assure the South would not cross the river and invade the Midwest. Southern forces would race to the Ohio border, forming the Army of Tenn. and beginning to build forts to attempt to cross the Ohio river. The US would form an army under General Buell, who after securing Ohio from invasion would march his army into West Virginia and assist in the effective destruction of the Shenandoah Valley.

On the Ocean, things were fairly quiet. The British and French were loudly threatening to interviene if the US enacted a major Blockade, and Lincoln had so far been unwilling or unable to push for it (In the entire game, I NEVER got a Blocade card.) Though Fort Fisher was seized, cutting off Wilmington, North Carolina, the planned attack on Morehead City was scrapped when a large garrison under General Thomas J. Jackson was placed to defend the only remaining major port in the Northern part of the Confederacy.

(Game talk: The Foriegn Intervention card showed up twice, once on turn 3 when Confederate Will was at 105, with intervention triggering at 110. The second was in my hand on turn 5, with the Confederate Will at 111 at the start of the turn, the only reason I didn't have it happen was I was able to play Richmond Bread Riots to drop the Will to 108 by the time I had to play the card.)

1862

In the East, the war was static, with the occasional battle to keep the two army bloodied and drawing manpower, a goal the US felt was critical to achieving victory in the West.

In the West, the war shifted into West Virginia, with the Army of Tenn. driving into West Virginia to prevent the Union Army of the Ohio from driving south or pinning Richmond. The first major battle in West Virginia was a Confederate Victory, but General Stuart was badly wounded in a tragic friendly fire incident, leaving the Army with out effective command Cavalry as the Union rushes General Pope with 15,000 men to strike a hammer blow in soon after. The Army of Tenn. was trapped in the mountains, with Union troops and Virginian loyalists trying to cut them off for the kill. Finally they broke out, only to be crushed in the battle of Lewisburg, where the retreat became a rout, and the entire Confederate army was lost. The Result was crushing to Confederate morale, and the South was forced to send further troops to stop the Union Army.

West of the Mississippi, the US gained little ground in Missouri, but the Corp under General Banks originally planned to invade Morehead City was diverted to invade Sabine City, Texas. The Texans were unable to stop the landing, and there was no organized resistance, all troops being sent north to fight on other fronts. The result was the fall of Texas, with Texas effectively being occupied and being put under a military government. Sam Houston was offered the Governor's seat again, but he refused, saying he would run for election, not be appointed. Confederate forces raced to Shreveport, LA, to prevent the situation from leading to a worse invasion. The US responded by building forts to prevent a Southern push, while waiting for reinforcements.

The Oceans remained a Northern pond, with the US invading Pensacola, Florida, and threatening to march on Mobile on a land route. The Confederacy was badly stretched out, fearing pushes from several directions. But the Southern will was far from broken (SW was still at 97, and must hit Zero to surrender,) as the fall of 1862 rose over the board. The Mississippi was still firmly under Southern Control, and Kentucky was firmly southern. With no Blockade, Confederate forces were still fairly well armed, though much of the blockade supplies were then used to guard the blockade ports.

Then the Southern Player conceded. I was depressed. He said he couldn't see a way out and was up for some other light gaming. He ended up playing Memior '44. Though I was victorious by default, I was hoping to see how I could try to crack the huge confederate nut. Losing Kentucky was bad, but the chance to use West Virginia as a way into the South worked out.

So there you go, any questions?
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Randy C
United States
Chicago
Illinois
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Robert L Howard (Medal of Honor recipient)
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An early concession may not be too satisfying. I also like this game but for me its a little too long for face to face play. I have played many games using ACTS and Cyberboard and have had a ton of fun. Some do not like the start-stop nature of online or email play, but with out it, I would rarely be able to play this great game.
 
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Steve
United States
Flagstaff
Arizona
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Great report, thanks!
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David Landon
United States
Bothell
Washington
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Luckily a friend of mine is willing to write off most of a saturday to play this game. We love it!
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