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Duel of Ages II» Forums » Rules

Subject: Blocked shots == lost opportunity? rss

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Chris Kessel
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Despite a ton of games, I realized I didn't actually know the official ruling and I can't seem to find it in the Fire or Opfire rules.

Let's say I have a gun with OpFire 1 and two possible shots. If I want shot A, but once laying out the line of sight I realize it's blocked, can I then take shot B instead or did I spend my "Opfire 1" trying for shot A?

I've always played the lenient route, but I've played other games where if you eyeballed it wrong you lost your chance.
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Brett Murrell
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No, blocked shots do not use a shot. The only negative effect is if you planned for multiple Fire Phase shots and cannot use them.
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Chris Kessel
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SpitfireIXA wrote:
No, blocked shots do not use a shot. The only negative effect is if you planned for multiple Fire Phase shots and cannot use them.

I think I'm reading more into the response than you meant, but I'll follow up to be sure.

So, if you declare a Fire Phase shot and it's blocked, are you locked into having chosen to Fire instead of Move? Or, once you see it's blocked can you then decide you'd rather Move? (or, if you had multiple, decided that you'd rather move than take less shots than you'd hoped).

By the way, the original question was prompted when I saw your strategy post about folks not taking full advantage of long range weapons because they were afraid they'd eyeballed it wrong. We've pretty consistently taken out the dental floss and let folks check LOS whenever they want during the game (sometimes even when it's the other player's turn and I'm just planning out what I can see while they're thinking).

Consequently, I thought "Why would anyone be afraid to take a shot? Worst case, nothing happens".
 
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Brett Murrell
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Declaring Fire shots does not prevent the character from scrapping the idea and just moving instead. The only negative is the penalty suffered by declaring multiple shots and then not being able to take that many shots.
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Chris Kessel
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SpitfireIXA wrote:
Declaring Fire shots does not prevent the character from scrapping the idea and just moving instead. The only negative is the penalty suffered by declaring multiple shots and then not being able to take that many shots.

Ah, ok, got it, because in the Fire phase you first declare X shots taken and THEN start resolving them, so the penalty is determined before you'd know if one of the shots was impossible?

But, there's nothing preventing me from lining out each shot before I actually declared I was executing the Fire phase, right? I think, in practice, that'd effectively mean we'd figure out the penalty for shots actually possible after lining out each declared shot.

There'd still be the possibility a shot could be negated by some other action (e.g. a defensive Cube).


Edit:
That probably sounds like being a rules lawyer, but my goal is actually the opposite...not forcing players to be OCD about lining out everything before actually declaring a Fire phase. A sort of gentlemen's agreement that, yea, you could have figured out before hand, so lets assume you did.

I'm also good with the opposite, where you have to eyeball everything, no pre-measuring (a hold over from miniatures gaming). I've found that usually gives me an unfair advantage though since I've played so many hex-based games, I instinctively know several useful heuristics about where lines would cross hex boundaries.
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ckessel wrote:
But, there's nothing preventing me from lining out each shot before I actually declared I was executing the Fire phase, right?

I think the rulebook is.

Master Compendium, page 6:
Quote:
You cannot check line of sight before announcing the
number of shots.
If you misjudged lines of sight and
cannot take as many shots as you announced, you still
suffer the full multi-target penalty above.

The way I understand this rule, combined with Brett's answers in this thread, is the following:

First thing you do when shooting is declaring the number of shots. Only then you can check the line of sight. If all shots are blocked, you can just move instead. If at least one shot is not blocked, you can make the shot, but you must suffer the penalty that you selected when announcing the number of shots. Either way, you can always decide not to shoot at all. If you don't shoot, you don't reveal a ranged weapon.

I interpret this penalty thematically as the time it took the shooter to aim at different targets. By the time he realizes that he can only make a clean shot at 1 target (and not 3 as he planned), he doesn't have much time left to execute the shot, and so he suffers an accuracy penalty. But he can always abandon the idea of shooting at all, and start moving instead.
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Chris Kessel
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Th334 wrote:

I think the rulebook is.

Master Compendium, page 6

Thanks. I read the section twice and still managed to miss that. soblue
 
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