Recommend
6 
 Thumb up
 Hide
5 Posts

Border Reivers» Forums » Reviews

Subject: Bilingual Border Reivers Review: English and Portuguese rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
hugo mocc
United Kingdom
Leeds
United Kingdom
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
(This bilingual review - English and Portuguese - is published in http://bodegueims.blogspot.com/ )


And we finally arrive to my first game analysis: Jackson Pope's "Border Reivers" (Reivers pronounced as reavers like in the "Firefly" TV series) is the "victim" since I believe that not only much hyped games are good games, and although it didn't make it to Essen this year, it will get there sooner rather than later, essentially because it is, in my humble opinion, a very good game.

After having played the game at PsychoCon2006 (2-player game against Jack) and also at home, my early impressions remain unaltered: Overall good components, interesting theme, simple enough rules and excellent playability in a 2 to 4 player game that plays in under 90 minutes and has a definite feel of light-civ game.

The game takes us to the Scottish Borders in XVth century Britain. Northern English and Southern Scottish clans are constantly involved in bloody skirmishes, pillages and raids whilst both English and Scottish crowns "turn a blind eye to the chaos". Players take on the role of a warring Border clan trying to expand, develop and defend itself against neighbour clans and dominate the region. Dominion will have to be militar (conquering all your neighbours) or economic (having 40 gold at the beginning of the turn).

COMPONENTS (3.5/5)

The components are of very-good build quality for a home-assembled first edition. A laminate scoring sheet to keep track of the players' points; Same durable material for game's 50 cards; The map tiles which are triangles instead of hexes, double-sided, and are made of strong card with the same laminate finish as the scoring sheet, making them very sturdy and resistant (they will be much handled during games). The remaining pieces are all wood: towns and cities are coloured wooden disks, armies are coloured octogonal prisms and fortifications (towers and castles) are white cubes and cylinders. Although I consider the scoring sheet and land/board tiles to be of good build quality, there are just a couple of issues that I think prevent them from being outstanding, and are mainly to do with the design:

1) The board tiles are double-sided and some will be turned/replaced during a game. This makes for a fiddly experience as the players turn or replace the tiles because by doing it the adjacent tiles (with or without wooden bits) will be messed with and require further reorganising;

2) The scoring sheet layout is a little confusing in the beginning, with the scoring track being divided into 5 columns (I think of it as stacks), each starting numbers from the bottom, but players normally tend to get used to it by the time their gold goes from 9 to 10 or 19 to 20.

3) The artwork is also somewhat basic: it does the job but can and should be improved in next editions.

I think that an overall 3.5 out of 5 for the components is due, considering, as I said, that this first edition of the game is home-made.

THEME (4/5)

The theme is really interesting and the game "fits in" nicely. Although the game components do not give much away in terms of its theme, the gameplay does and you really feel involved in 'guerrilla-style' warfare throughout the game. The economic factor and the "subterfuge" cards add to the flavour of the game.

So, here I tend to give it a 4 out of 5.

RULES (4/5)

The rules are simple. Having said that, it is always better to have the author of the game to play with you if you're playing for the first time. I was very lucky to have played my first game with Jack and he was a really good teacher. If, by any reason, you are not as lucky as I was, the rulebook is very straightforward and offers a few examples of game play, as well as detailed explanations of the rules and game setup images.

I would say that new players should get into the game in about 15-20 minutes, maximum, when starting by reading the rulebook. This means that a 4 out of 5 is only due to the fact that only the rulebook cover is printed in colour and all the remaining pages in black and white.

PLAYABILITY (5/5)

Here is where the game really shines! After the game setup, players play in turns, which are divided in 6 turn phases: 1) First Cards Phase; 2) Reinforcements Phase; 3) Actions Phase; 4) Combat Phase; 5) Tax Phase; 6) Second Cards Phase.

The game-setup (or setup phase) is where players lay the board (tiles) according to the number of players, choose playing colours and decide who goes first, before actually starting playing the game.

The First and Second Cards Phases refer to card play. In the first one, at the beginning of the turn, the player may play any card that reads: "At the beginning of your turn...", whereas in the second, at the end of the turn, the player uses, if he/she wants, any card in his/her hand that reads: "At the end of your turn...".

"There are 10 cards to choose from in Border Reivers..." are the words printed on the rulebook. There are, in fact more than 10 but only 10 different ones.

"Ambush" and "Insurrection" cards give players additional armies in combat situations, which are removed at the end of combat and return the card to the hand of the player who played it. Similarly, "Militia" and "Reiving Party" have the return to hand mechanism but to different outcomes (Militia defending settlements and Reiving Party stealing from them).

The "Market", "Guildhouses" and "Training Camp" cards are buildings cards that you play in front of you to give you something every turn: extra gold (Market), a second roll for card reinforcements (Guildhouses), and extra rolls for army reinforcements (Training Camp). Another card, aptly named "Saboteurs", will return a building card that is in play back into the deck.

"Spies" will let you look at your opponent's cards or prevent an opponent from using his/her "Spies" on you. And finally, "Siege Engines" allow you to reduce fortifications' levels, or, similarly to "Spies", return a "Siege Engines" used against you.

Reinforcements Phase brings the opportunity to spend that gold, which is burning holes in your pockets (but also which might win you the game in the end...), in new armies or cards. Here the mechanics are quite clever: for each city a player has, he decides how much he wants to spend in TRYING to get a card or an army. By "trying" I mean rolling a 10-sided die, which, in turn, means that if you decide to spend, say, 9 on a card, you definitely get that card. If, however, you decide to spend only 3, in order to get your card, your roll will have to result in a 3 or less. The beauty here is that the 10-sided die has a zero (0) face, which comes in handy (if you're lucky), when you don't have any gold, like in the beginning of the game.

Actions Phase is where you do all the work: moving armies, cultivating lands, building fortifications (towers/castles), settling (armies settle to become towns or cities) and occupying the mine tile.

In Combat Phase, well you know, players' armies sort out their differences if they happen to occupy the same tile on the board. Combat is resolved by rolling 6-sided die (each player) and adding to the result of the roll any bonuses obtained by having fortifications (defending player) and/or superiority in numbers (both players). Towns and cities also count as armies and are "downgraded" if they lose their battles.

Taxation Phase is the last with the active player earning "gold" for each city, town and the mine (if it is under the control of the player), and lastly the already mentioned Second Card Phase takes place and it's the end of the turn.

GAME EXPERIENCE (4/5)

As I said, playing your first game against the author of any game makes, arguably, the perfect learning session. Apart from that, Border Reivers is an outstanding light civ game: It's got resource management; It's got tough decisions; it's got strategy; it's got tactical conflict; it's got innovative or unusual game mechanisms; it's got player comebacks; it plays amazingly well with 2 (and as I and you can imagine, it will play even better with more); and appears to have great replayability.

My only qualms are to do with those small issues of game design and the artwork, which I think can improve in future editions.

On the whole, I think this game is a solid 4 ut of 5) and leaves me with great expectations for Jackson Pope's upcoming creations. I have bought one copy of this first edition (limited and numbered- 100 copies, mine's no. 30), signed by the author, which adds even more value to an already great game!



(Esta resenha bilingue - Inglês e Português - está publicada em http://bodegueims.blogspot.com/ )


Chegou (Finalmente!) a hora da minha primeira crítica. A "vítima" chama-se "Border Reivers" (Reivers pronuncia-se como reavers - como aqueles canibais da série televisiva "Firefly"), é da autoria de Jackson Pope, e escolhi-o, pois acredito que nem só os jogos "da moda" são bons jogos, e este, ainda que não tenha sequer marcado presença em Essen, irá fazê-lo dentro em breve porque é, na minha humilde opinião, um jogo muito bom.

Depois de ter o jogado/aprendido na convenção de jogos PsychoCon2006 (fiz um jogo a 2 contra o autor), e também em casa, as minhas primeiras impressões continuam inalteradas: Componentes de boa qualidade, tema interessante, regras simples de aprender e excelente jogabilidade num "light-civ" que se joga em menos de 90 minutos e que aceita entre 2 e 4 jogadores.

O jogo leva-nos às regiões fronteiríças entre a Escócia e a Inglaterra nos séculos XV e XVI, onde clãs de ambos os lados se envolvem em confrontos sangrentos, raides e pilhagens, enquanto os monarcas de um lado e do outro fecham os olhos à confusão. Cada jogador assume o papel de um desses clãns, tentando expandir, desenvolver e defender-se contra os clãs vizinhos e, eventualmente, dominar a região. Esse domínio pode ter 2 vertentes: militar (conquistar todos os oponentes) ou económica (começar um turno com mais de 40 peças de ouro). Esta última parece ser a mais comum forma de terminar o jogo e talvez a única que permite fazê-lo dentro do tempo previsto.

COMPONENTES (3.5/5)

Os componentes são de muito boa qualidade em termos da sua construção, que é, impressão gráfica à parte, feita à mão pelo autor nesta primeira edição.

Uma folha de pontuação com acabamento laminado; 50 cartas do mesmo material; Os "tiles" que constituem o tabuleiro de jogo sendo triangulos, em vez dos mais comuns hexágonos e feitos com o mesmo acabamento laminado que os torna bastante resistentes, já que por terem 2 faces diferentes, serão sujeitos a repetidas "viragens" durante os jogos e, todas as restantes peças do jogo, em madeira (de qualidade "meeplesca" alemã), que incuem aldeias, cidades, exércitos e fortificações (torres e castelos).

A meu ver, a única pecha (de maior) do jogo está no design de alguns componentes, que embora eu considere serem de boa qualidade em termos dos materiais e sua construção, não serão tão fantásticos em termos da sua funcionalidade:

1) Os tiles triangulares com 2 lados diferentes, apesar de serem uma aposta numa mecânica pouco vista, tornam-se, durante o jogo, um pouco "complicantes", já que o serem "virados" durante o jogo, leva a que se mexa (não intencionalmente) nos "tiles" adjacentes e nas peças sobre estes, o que pode ser considerado aborrecido, pois ter-se-ão de recolocar todas as peças deslocadas.

2) A folha das pontuações, ou melhor o seu "layout" gráfico com as casas de pontuação divididas em 5 colunas (eu tento imaginar as colunas como pilhas de moedas, já que a pontuação representa o "ouro" de cada jogador) é um pouco confuso ao princípio, pois em cada coluna (pilha) a contagem começa do fundo e não do topo como habitualmente. Por altura da pontuação (leia-se "ouro") dos jogadores passar de 9 para 10 ou de 19 para 20 é que isto causa maior confusão, mas é nesses precisos momentos que se percebe como funciona.

3) A produção artística do jogo é algo básica, mas serve o propósito, embora eu ache que este é um aspecto que pode ser fácilmente revisto e melhorado em próximas edições

No cômputo geral, acho que os componentes são o elo mais fraco deste jogo, mas levando em conta o facto de ser uma produção "caseira", 3.5 em 5 é uma nota justa.


TEMA (4/5)

O tema é bastante interessante e o jogo enquadra-se bem nele. Embora os componentes sejam algo básicos (quase abstractos) e não "denunciem" o tema, a jogabilidade, por outro lado, envolve os jogadores num ambiente de guerrilha pós-medieval, apimentado pela presença do factor económico-civilizacional e pelas cartas de "subterfúgio".

Assim, aqui dou-lhe um sólido 4 em 5.

REGRAS (4/5)

As regras são simples. Dito isto, é sempre reconfortante ter o autor do jogo a explicá-las no primeiro jogo que fazemos, e eu tive essa sorte, já que o Jack se revelou um excelente professor. Se, por qualquer razão vocês não tiverem a sorte que eu tive, o livro de regras não é complicado oferece explicações e exemplos das regras e imagens do "set-up" do jogo.

Eu diria que novos jogadores devem tomar cerca de 15-20 minutos para ler e assimilar as regras para começarem a jogar. O facto de o livro de regras ser a preto e branco (apenas a capa é a cores) é determinante na minha apreciação: 4 em 5.


JOGABILIDADE (5/5)

É aqui que este jogo brilha! Depois da preparação ("setup"), o jogo desenrola-se por turnos, que se subdividem em 6 fases (1 turno = 6 fases): 1) Primeira fase de cartas; 2) Fase de reforços; 3) Fase de acções; 4) Fase de combate; 5) Fase de impostos; 6) Segunda fase de cartas. Falarei das cartas mais adiante, para já concentremo-nos no turno.

Antes de começar a jogar há uma fase de preparação (vulgo "setup"). É aqui que os jogadores colocam os "tiles" que vão compor o tabuleiro de jogo, escolhem as cores com que vão jogar e decidem que joga primeiro.

A Primeira e Segunda fases de cartas referem-se, como o nome indica, aos momentos do jogo em que normalmente se jogam cartas. Sendo a primeira no princípio do turno, as cartas cujo texto diga "At the beginning of your turn..." ("No princípio do seu turno...") serão para jogar aqui, tal como as cartas cujo texto é "At the end of your turn..." ("No fim do seu turno...") serão para jogar... adivinhem lá... exacto: no fim do turno.


O livro de regras diz que existem 10 cartas para escolher em "Border Reivers". De facto existem mais do que 10. Para ser exacto, 50. Mas destas 50, só existem 10 diferentes, ou seja, há 5 cartas de cada (5 x 10 = 50).

"Ambush" (Emboscada) e "Insurrection" (Insurreição) são cartas que dão ao jogador exércitos adicionais para situações específicas de combate. Estes exércitos são removidos do tabuleiro no fim do combate e a carta volve à mão do jogador. Similarmente, "Militia" (Mil_ícia) e "Reiving Party" (Bando de Salteadores) apresentam o mecanismo de devolver a carta para a mão, mas para desfechos diferentes ("Militia" para defesa de aldeias e cidades, "Reiving Party" para saquear aldeias e cidades).

As cartas de "Market" (Mercado), "Guildhouses" (Guildas) e "Training Camp" (Campo de Treino), são cartas de edificios que cada jogador pode colocar na sua área de jogo e permanecem lá até que sejam removidas por outra carta ou o jogo acabe. Elas dão ao jogador algo extra em cada turno: Ouro extra (Market), um segundo lançamento de dados para reforços de cartas (Guildhouses), ou um segundo lançamento para reforços de exércitos (Training Camp). A carta que remove estas cartas-edifício da mesa chama-se "Saboteurs" (Sabotadores).

"Spies" (Espiões) permite ao jogador olhar para as cartas de um adversário ou para o impedir de ver a suas (quando é ele a jogar "Saboteurs"). Por fim, "Siege Engines" (Catapultas) permitem reduzir o nível das fortificações, ou, como "Spies", devolver uma "Siege engines" jogada contra nós.

A fase de "Reinforcements" (Reforços) traz a oportunidade de gastarmos o ouro que trazemos nos bolsos (tenho que fazer aqui um pequeno parêntesis para lembrar que neste jogo, Ouro é igual a pontos de vitória), em novos exércitos ou cartas. A mecânica de jogo é muito interessante: por cada cidade que um jogador tenha, esse jogador terá de decidir quanto ouro vai querer gastar a TENTAR obter novas cartas ou exércitos. Quando digo "tentar" quero dizer lançar um dado de 10 faces, o que significa que se o jogador decidir gastar 9 ouros numa "tentativa" ele definitivamente obtém o seu reforço (carta ou exército). Contudo, se o jogador decidir gastar somente 3 ouros, ele terá de obter um lançamento de 3 ou menos para ser bem sucedido. A beleza desta mecânica reside no facto de que o dado tem uma face de valor 0 (zero), o que significa que mesmo sem gastar, um jogador pode ter a sorte de obter reforços (cartas ou exércitos). Isto é muito útil no início do jogo quando os recursos são escassos.

A "Actions Phase" (Fase de Acções) é quando o jogador faz todo o trabalho: mover exércitos, cultivar terras, construir fortificações, fundar aldeamentos ou cidades (com exércitos), e ocupar o "tile" da Mina.

Na fase de combate os exércitos dos jogadores resolvem as suas desavenças desde que ocupem o mesmo "tile" no tabuleiro. O combate resolve-se com o lançamento de um dado de 6 faces por cada jogador, ao resultado do qual são adicionados bónus por ter fortificações (no caso do jogador defensor) ou superioridade numérica (para ambos os jogadores. Cidades e aldeias também contam como exércitos e são "despromovidas" se perdem as suas batalhas.

A Fase de Impostos (Taxation Phase) permite ao jogador receber ouro de cada cidade, aldeia e mina que controlar e para finalizar o turno, joga-se a Segunda Fase de Cartas.

EXPERIÊNCIA DO JOGO (4/5)

Como disse anteriormente, jogar o primeiro jogo (seja de que jogo for) contra o autor desse jogo, é, possívelmente, a sessão de aprendizagem perfeita. Mas mesmo descontando o facto de eu ter tido esse privilégio, "Border Reivers" e um excelente jogo do tipo "light-civ" porque: Tem gestão de recursos; Tem decisões díficeis; Tem estrategia; Tem conflitos tácticos; Tem mecanismos de jogo inovadores ou pouco usuais; Tem reviravoltas; Joga-se bem com 2 jogadores (e eu imagino que se jogue ainda melhor com 3 ou 4); e parece ter imenso potencial de re-jogabilidade (cada novo jogo com características diferentes).

A minha única crítica vai para os pequenos problemas no design de alguns componentes e para a componente artística que parece ter ficado um pouco esquecida, mas que creio poder vir a melhorar bastante no futuro.

Resumindo e concluindo, penso que este jogo merece uma nota final de 4 (em 5), o que me deixa com elevadas expectativas para as novas criações do autor (Jackson Pope). Por achar que é um bom jogo, adquiri uma cópia da primeira edição (limitada e numerada - 100 cópias, a minha é a no. 30) o que adiciona ainda mais valor a um jogo já de si bastante bom!
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jackson Pope
United Kingdom
Newcastle upon Tyne
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Hey Hugo,

Thanks for the excellent (and very flattering review), I really enjoyed the back and forth nature of the game we played together and look forward to a re-match at Beyond Monopoly some time. I would recommend your review, but seeing as I don't want to appear as shilling my game I'll settle for a thumbsup

Cheers,

Jack
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jackson Pope
United Kingdom
Newcastle upon Tyne
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
One slight correction:
The Insurrection card is never returned to your hand - whether the attack is successful or not.

Cheers,
Jack
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ray Smith
United States
Newburg
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Stay thirsty my friends.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
So, does this mean that there is a professionally made edition of BR forthcoming, as you intimated? (I hope, I hope, I hope!)

Great review, and best wishes Jack.

Ray
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jackson Pope
United Kingdom
Newcastle upon Tyne
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
rdsmith wrote:
So, does this mean that there is a professionally made edition of BR forthcoming, as you intimated? (I hope, I hope, I hope!)

Great review, and best wishes Jack.

Ray

It all depends on how well the limited edition sells - if this goes well enough to convince me that I could sell out of a professional run (which of course would have to be many more copies), then I'll do it :-)

Cheers,

Jack
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.