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Subject: Game Hiding, Option 7 -- Floorboards rss

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Man thinks, the river flows.
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Riva
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Floorboards
    It’s hard to find the traditional loose floorboard these days as most houses are built using 4x8 sheets of plywood on top of the joists. However even newer houses can have smaller floorboards created into them with a sawzall. The best option for this is under wall-to-wall carpeting near a corner with no furniture or light furniture. It’s fairly rare that your spouse will even attempt to lift wall-to-wall carpeting and careful editing of the tacking strip will make for a flap that can be pretty easily pulled up and out of place. In the event your spouse notices the carpet is loose, express some expletives about the teenage installers that the company sent to put in the carpet, tell your spouse you’ll need to bum tools from your buddy Rich to fix it, and then promise them you’ll get to it this weekend. With a bit of effort this excuse can last a year or more. Even if they notice the carpet is loose it is very unlikely they will dig any deeper by pulling up the offending corner and looking for a cut plysheet. A remarkably safe spot.

Pros:
1. Storage is in a safe, climate controlled area.
2. Reasonably easy access if the room chosen receives little traffic, but access must be planned in advance.
Cons:
1. Joist separation measures sixteen inches between centerlines on two-bys, so the thin dimension of any game hidden in the floorboards is limited to about fourteen inches, depending on depth.
2. Installation is time consuming, loud, and leaves evidence that must be meticulously managed – plan time and effort accordingly.
3. Installation likely limited to an upper floor, and games with significant weight cannot be rested on the bottom if it is made of drywall. Installing a “bottom” to your space or a rack of some sort is recommended, increasing cost, time, and effort.

    My initial work on a floorboard hiding place (I have plysheet) hit a snag when my guess at a good spot resulted in hitting a fire-break board darn near dead center. Easy enough to remove, but reinstalling the break farther down the joist required some long screws that I did not have on hand. My wife was away for the weekend so I was able to adjust with little difficulty. Capacity is six good-sized games in two columns of three on ten-inch joists. BattleLore may take two slots. I used chicken wire for the underlying support which proved to be a pain-in-the-neck. Although this hiding place has yet to be discovered I don’t recommend it as a good solution due to its limited space and access. It is an excellent location for that WWII Luger you picked up at the auction though, or for hiding the Girls-Gone-Wild tapes.
 
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Antigonus Monophthalmus
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This is everything I ever needed to know about anything.
 
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Gwen
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No loose floorboard, no sheets of plywood, but concrete ...

And what's more , with a hubby working for a building company, it would be kind of suspicious if I start to drill a hole in the concrete.
 
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Tim Synge
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NEWTON ABBOT
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I have never resorted to the floorboard scheme and it seems like a good idea. However, the key to success is not only that the location is unlikely to be investigated or discovered, but that it is clean and the games are free from risk of animal attack.

Quote:
Installation likely limited to an upper floor


This is essential. We live in an old house (European "old" is older than American "old", remember) and we had to take up some floorboards (ground floor room) last year to remove a dead rat that had somehow snuck in during the winter and had begun to smell very unpleasant indeed. Just imagine the damage that a rodent looking for nesting material could do!

Even at floor level (as opposed to beneath it), there can be problems. I once left a couple of games under the bottom shelf of a bookcase, neatly out of sight, for a week or two. When I retrieved them, there was damage to the box lid surface which I suspect was caused by woodlice (do you have those in the States?). Not that we are overrun with them, just that every now and then one or two get into the house!

I am looking forward to the "under the bed" and "in the wardrobe" (closet?) episodes of this commentary.
 
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Mark Crane
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In the past BoingBoing has linked to a Drug Enforcement Agency webpage that hilighted the wily tricks of drug smugglers. It may be a useful resource for this project.
 
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Jim Carvin
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Ah, the diabolical Dice … a word of caution; don't throw them when you're alone. The fiends lack loyalty, and their notion of nourishment is quite disturbing.
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You're thinking down...I'm think UP!

Why limit yourself to the small area under the floorboards when you have TONS of wallspace for shelves?

Ah...you're thinking, "Because they're in clear sight dum-dum." But I have two words for you...drop ceiling! That's right, add a drop ceiling to the room of your choice (why not all of them?) but just make sure you drop it at least a foot. Then install shelves INSIDE the drop ceiling area all around the room! NO ONE will look there, you'll have easy access, climate control, protection from dirty looks and curious children, and a vast amount of new gaming storage space. Brilliant! devil
 
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