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Subject: Game Hiding, Option 9 -- Furnace Return Pipe rss

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Man thinks, the river flows.
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Furnace Return Pipe
    A properly functioning furnace or air conditioning unit will generally change the temperature of the air passing through it by thirty degrees. This makes the heating ducts in your house less-than-ideal places to hide your goods, although no doubt more than a few of us have considered lifting the vent cover and dropping something small like Fists of Dragonstones into the tube below to see how it would fit. Indeed the outbound pipes of your forced-air ventilation system are a particularly poor choice for anyone concerned about the longevity of their purchases. However, the return vents on your system are bigger, generally squarer, and more importantly – temperature controlled. They are the one of the best spots in your house to hide games and also one of the easiest to implement.

Pros:
1. Storage is in a safe, climate controlled area.
2. Access isn’t too bad, although take care to make as little noise as possible as vent pipes can transmit sounds in unpredictable ways.
3. Low cost and simple to install. Tin snips, a screwdriver, a few screws and hinges, a latch, and an adhesive sticker reading “High Voltage” are about all that is needed to create a fine hiding spot that your spouse will avoid in spite of its less-than-hidden entryway.
Cons:
1. Likely limited space, but varies.
2. Spouse may complain about heating/cooling issues in the house.

    Generally in most forced air systems there is at least one large “return” pipe that enters right at the base of the furnace. In systems with two or more return pipes that meet each other at this point, the amount of space can approach 10 cubic feet and have a remarkably rectangular shape to it. Install the access door as high in the space as possible to ease the entry and exit of game boxes, and be sure to protect the edges around the opening, as the freshly-cut aluminum will likely be sharp. This could badly damage game boxes (or lacerate your arm).
    Note that taking the time to look for the return vents on each floor of your house may yield other, smaller hiding places, although most of these are the width of a 2x4 and won’t present substantial opportunities for game hiding. But it never hurts to keep your eyes open.
 
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Tim Myers
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A couple of more cons:

1. Depending on the size and weight of the games they may be dragged down the duct over time due to the suction from the blower, so you may want to secure them some how.
2. Return ducts can accumulate dust and dirt over time, so you may want to put a protective bag over the game(s). You can see how dirty the ducts can get when you check out this location, depending on the age of your home.

PS: This is a great series!! laugh
 
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Zom Bee
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Have you thought of creating a geeklist to place all these idea in one place ? I've enjoyed reading them and it would be nice to have them in one geeklist for posterity.

EDIT: nevemind. A quick searched revealed one has already been built.
http://www.boardgamegeek.com/geeklist/17530

although I would have preferred to be able to read the articles within the geeklist itself.
 
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