Recommend
2 
 Thumb up
 Hide
4 Posts

Kill Doctor Lucky» Forums » Sessions

Subject: Kill Dr. Lucky -- Session Report rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Greg Schloesser
United States
Jefferson City
TN
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Editor’s Note: My full review of Kill Doctor Lucky will appear in Knucklebones magazine. Following is an abbreviated version.

“You have hated Doctor Lucky for as long as you can remember, and you’ve secretly been awaiting this perfect chance to take the old man out.” So begins the tale of Kill Doctor Lucky, the quirky, “reverse-Clue” game from designer James Ernest and his own Titanic Games. The objective is brutal: kill the old codger. The problem is that he is one of the luckiest curmudgeons on the planet, and has an incredible knack for escaping mortal danger time and again.

Kill Doctor Lucky uses a setting familiar to anyone who has ever played the classic game of Clue. A party has assembled at Dr. Lucky’s mansion. Unlike Clue, however, there is no body … yet. Here, the setting is a step earlier, as players are all attempting to kill the good doctor. Players will move to different rooms in the mansion, hoping to corner the doctor and commit the dastardly deed. Murder attempts are conducted via card play, and usually utilize a variety of strange weapons, including duck decoys, shoehorns, and even a tight hat. Most attempts, however, are doomed to fail, as all players have the opportunity to play “failure” cards in order to thwart the attempt.

Murder attempts are made by playing a weapon card. Each weapon card has a value, ranging from 2 – 4, but this value can be increased dramatically if the weapon is used in the listed room. For example, the broomstick has a normal murder value of ‘2’, but this increases to a deadly ‘7’ if the attempt is being made in the Servant’s Quarters. Thus, one of the main objectives is to maneuver the good doctor to a room wherein a weapon can be more effective. A player may attempt a murder without playing a weapon card, but the attempt, which amounts to little more than a poke in the eyes, has a value of only ‘1’.

In clockwise order, each player then has the opportunity to help foil the attempt by playing one or more “failure” cards. Each failure card has a value ranging from 1 – 3, and the idea is for the players to collectively play enough of these cards to equal or exceed the value of the murder attempt. If successful, the murder attempt fails, the failure cards are removed from the game, and the player attempting the murder receives a spite token as compensation. There is an abundance of failure cards in the deck, but these will gradually be depleted as the game progresses. Thus, early murder attempts will often meet with failure, but eventually players will not have enough failure cards to thwart an attempt. The old doctor will be slain … eventually.

Spite tokens can be accumulated and used to enhance the value of a murder attempt, or the value of a failure card. These tokens are a new addition to the game system, being absent from the original version of the game released back in 1996 by Cheapass Games.
They are a nice addition, but do have the effect of prolonging the game.

The game concludes when someone successfully kills Dr. Lucky. Due to the abundance of failure cards in the deck, this can take a considerable amount of time. Indeed, a bit too much time, as the process does grow a bit weary. There is no denying that the game is fun at first, and the quirky text on the failure cards is quite humorous. However, the ultimate goal of killing the doctor takes a bit too long. Fortunately, this can be easily corrected by removing some of the failure cards from the deck.

The murder attempt process has a “pass-the-buck” aspect to it that isn’t popular with some folks. Players will often decline to play failure cards, forcing the players next in line to play some or risk losing the game if the murder attempt is successful. I’ve witnesses some players refuse to fall victim to such tactics and allow a player’s attempt to succeed. In this sense, this process is a bit fragile and dependent upon the cooperation of all players.

While the game can accommodate up to seven players, it is truly best with four or five. With more, it is exceedingly difficult to corner Dr Lucky out-of-sight of your opponents, so murder attempts are scarcer. This has the effect of prolonging the game even further.

In spite of its flaws, Kill Doctor Lucky is still a fun ride, albeit a bit too long. It has built-in humor, even if it is a bit on the dark side. The professional treatment this new version has received is laudable, and it will provide a welcome change-of-pace from most traditional games.

Chris, Maik, Kevin, Rhonda, Ray, Gail and I stalked the mansion, hoping to corner the old doctor and do away with him. Attempt-after-attempt was made, but all met with failure. Eventually, the failure cards were eliminated, and when Chris cornered the doctor in the trophy room and smacked him with a crepe pan, the evil deed was accomplished.

Ratings: Chris 7, Gail 6.5, everyone else 6

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Michael Nerman
Canada
Winnipeg
Manitoba
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I haven't found that spite tokens prolong the game, but rather speed it up, as someone eventually will attempt a kill with 5 or more tokens...
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Brian Peters
United States
Iowa
flag msg tools
It's time to go Full Chort.
badge
‎"NO FATE BUT THE NARRATIVES WE IMPOSE ON LIFE'S RANDOM CHAOS TO DISTRACT OURSELVES FROM OUR EXISTENTIAL PLIGHT"
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
It was my understanding that the point of spite tokens was to speed up the game. I have not, however, actually played with them yet.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Greg Schloesser
United States
Jefferson City
TN
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
fnord3125 wrote:
It was my understanding that the point of spite tokens was to speed up the game. I have not, however, actually played with them yet.


That may well be the intent, but in our game, it actually had the opposite effect. Spite tokens kept changing hands, and prolonged the affair.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.