Kyle
United States
Up Nort' Der
Wisconsin
flag msg tools
designer
VAST:                The Crystal Caverns   The Fearsome Foes  The Mysterious Manor
badge
DV: Anakin Skywalker was weak. I destroyed him.                 AT: Then I will avenge his death.             DV: Revenge is not the Jedi way.             AT: I am no Jedi.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Roughly five years ago Z-Man Games, Inc. published a brand new game called Merchants & Marauders, by then-unknown designer Christian Marcussen. It was yet another entry into the already-saturated category of Pirates-themed games, but this one was different. This one was a masterpiece. It was not without its flaws, as no game is perfect, but it rose far above any Pirate games that had come before it and even those that (so far) have come after. Many of those others are quite good and are very enjoyable in their own right, but none have come close to M&M.

For nearly five years, it has stood as the benchmark for Pirate games. It's a highly-thematic, "open sandbox" game that sits in a comfortable place somewhere between the low-luck, mechanisms-driven, and sometimes dry "Euro"-style of games, and the luck/dice-heavy, theme-driven "Ameritrash"-style of games. It takes in the best parts of both worlds and avoids most of the negatives associated with either extreme.

As an already fully-developed game, it didn't need an expansion. It was a complete game, and nothing felt like it was missing.

Despite that, players still wanted more. Finally, five years later they got it, and it was worth the wait:

Merchants & Marauders: Seas of Glory

This long-awaited Seas of Glory expansion takes an already-excellent game, and pushes it up to a whole new level. It adds a whole lot more of almost everything, plus an entire series of new modules that blend in seamlessly with what's already there.

Three quick notes about the rest of this review:
1) I was a part of the playtesting team for this expansion, so even though it has only been on the shelves for a matter of days at the point of writing this, I've already played it countless times. In other words, this is most definitely not a or "played-only-once" or "first impression" review.
2) In the interests of not making this review longer than it already is, this will only be giving a somewhat generalized overview of each major component of the expansion and how they affect the game. I will not be rehashing the fine details of every rule. If you do want to read the full rules, you can find a PDF copy at either of these locations: (Z-Man Website) OR (BGG File Section).
3) This will be broken down by modules, in the same order they appear in the rulebook. If you're only interested in specific modules feel free to skip down to those sections. If you only want some overall information and the Pros and Cons spelled out, scroll down to The Bottom Line section at the end.




The new stuff
Components
All of the components in this expansion are of the same high-quality you find in the base game. The new player boards and cardboard tokens are just as thick and robust as the originals, the cards are of the same/similar stock and finish, and the miniatures (both new and old) are just as nice and detailed too.

The new home port and NPC spawn markers (the little flags) are the same thick cardboard as all of the tokens and could be laid flat on the board, but they also include plastic bases so they can stand upright. In much the same way, the storm cloud is another solid piece of cardboard, but it too comes with a plastic base of its own that allows it to "float" about an inch above the board. They could have easily omitted the stands for the cloud and the flags and they would have still worked perfectly well, but their inclusion really adds to the visual appeal of the game, and makes them a bit more convenient to use at the same time.

The weather spinner is a nice three-piece design, with a solid cardboard "base" and a two-part plastic spinner that snaps together easily. It should spin freely for several rotations before coming to a stop (if yours doesn't, make sure it's installed correctly in the cardboard base and that there aren't stray bits of the plastic seams getting caught up).

Everything is top-notch, and you can tell they pulled out all of the stops with this, just like they did the first time around.

The only "black marks" in the component department are very minor, but are still worth a mention:
1) The coloration on some of the decks is slightly different from those of the original game. It's most noticeable on the backs of the Mission cards, but if you compare some of the other decks side-by-side and look closely enough, you can see it there too. The colors on the new cards look a little bit brighter and more vibrant. (Note that I have a first-edition copy of the base game, so this may be a complete non-issue for owners of the more recent reprints. I honestly don't know.) In any case, these differences in color have ZERO effect on gameplay. All of the new cards get shuffled in with their original counterparts, and there are more than enough of the new ones getting added to each deck (and enough internal variety) that even if you do know for a fact that the next card on the top of a deck is old or new, there's absolutely no advantage to be gained from it. In a perfect world the cards would have been an exact match, but even though they don't, it's not going to matter when actually playing this game.

2) The artwork on the Captain cards is of a slightly different style from the originals, and a FEW (that's a few, not most, and certainly not all) look slightly anachronistic. This is primarily because Christian (with approval by Z-Man) took the awesome move of allowing playtesters and a few others to get their own faces into the game. They didn't have to do this, and even if the end result wasn't perfect, it was still a great way to say "thank you" for the hard work that was put into making this expansion as good as it could be, and as great as it is. If the handful of "questionable" Captains truly bother you so much that you're willing to get upset about them, you can simply leave them in the box. Or create your own new replacements.



Module 1 - Rumors, Missions, Events, & Captains
Seas of Glory doubles the number of Rumors, Missions, and Captains in the game, and increases the size of the Event deck by half. What these do is introduce a great deal of extra variety, so if you'd played the original game so much that you've already seen everything, this should keep you busy for quite a while. If a M&M expansion had consisted of only these and nothing else, it still would have been really great add-on to the game. All of the new cards are marked with an icon to show they're from the expansion, but once you've added them into their respective decks there's no reason to ever have to take them back out. They'll all work the same no matter which other modules are in play.

Some interesting things of note...

Rumors
-There are four replacement Rumor cards included in the box. Three of these are there to correct misprinted cards from the base game, specifically ones showing the wrong icon (a treasure chest instead of a spyglass) for the scouting action required. The fourth card is a replacement for "A Myriad of Goods", which is a small change to the card that prevents an issue when used with the Contraband module. If you're playing without CB you can ignore the CB-specific text and the card works exactly as it has in the past.
-A few of the Rumors give you access to unique ships that have some (permanent) bonus traits above and beyond their standard counterparts. Players had been asking for something along these lines for a long time, and now they have it.
-Another old request was for parrots. "Why are there no parrots in this so-called 'Pirate' game?" Rumor has it, now there is one! If you're really Lucky you might find it.

Hey, aren't you guys in the wrong game?
Missions
-Ever wanted to start a War? Now you can!
-Want to sail around in a Man-o-War but don't want to risk battling it out with one at sea? Steal one!
-Want to fight with some hostile natives in a veritable Clash of Cultures? You can do that too!
-If you prefer less violent missions, you can try your hand at some hurricane research, transporting rare plants, or even mapping a coastline.
-Some great new tokens are also included so you can mark the ports where missions are available instead of placing the card there. It saves a lot of space on the board, and looks nice in the process. Tokens for a third mission are included because there are Events that can put a third in play.

Events
-The new events provide some of the biggest changes of these "normal" cards, with a variety of new effects that can really alter how the game plays out. The difficulty level of the game most definitely goes up. NPCs will be moving around a lot more often, as several of the new Events have movement icons for all six possible NPC ships, and a few of the others can draw out new NPCs (in addition to other effects) if they weren't already on the board.
-Some of the NPCs just got a whole lot meaner! The four new Naval Ships (one per nation) are each a permanent Man-o-War, so they keep that ship whether there's an active war or not.
Aside: Back when the base game first came out some people questioned why there were four Man-o-War NPC miniatures included when you could never have more than two in play at a time. At the time it was just a really nice bonus from Z-Man Games, Inc. that allowed painters to give each a unique nation-specific look, but Seas of Glory has taken advantage of those extras because now it's possible to have all four in play at once, without the help of a war! The odds of it happening are extremely slim, but don't be surprised to see three at once during some wars.
-Two new NPC Pirates enter the fray with a Man-o-War of their own (replacing the Frigate) and there are also two with a brand-new Brig (replacing the Sloop), so it won't just be Pirate-players who have to be extra careful when there are new NPCs sailing around.

Captains
-Artwork aside, the new Captains bring a wide variety of new stats and abilities to the table. Some are poised to become very powerful Pirates, while others will excel as Merchants. Others bring new opportunities, like a few that are particularly well suited for chasing down Rumors and Missions.

Home Port and NPC Spawn Markers
-Home port markers have been a very popular "pimp" for this game for years, and now there's an official set. They're not something that's strictly needed, but they're a really excellent visual reminder of which port each player calls home. No longer will you have to wonder if a player is sailing in a particular direction just to find a new opportunity, or if they're trying to sneak home to dump a load of gold into their stash - if their flag is nearby, you'll know. In the heat of the moment occasionally a player can lose track of their own home port, especially if they've already run through a Captain or two, so these markers are helpful to them as well.
-NPC Spawn markers are identical to the home port markers except in brown and black instead of player colors, and give a nice visual notice of where that new NPC will be appearing at the end of the round. No longer will players be "surprised" when they try to escape one danger only to have a new threat pop up right in front of them on the very next turn.



Module 2 - New Special Weapons
These new special weapons provide some fun new toys for Pirates, and additional defensive options for Merchants. In Merchant Raids they function exactly like the previous three (converting failures into successes), except now that you can carry six at once it's much easier to make multiple raids in a single run without needing to return to a port to resupply.

How are they in ship-vs-ship combat?
-Heated Shot appears to be extremely powerful at first glance because it provides an ongoing source of damage, and in a long, drawn-out battle it can be a major deciding factor in who comes out the victor. However, if the battle switches to crew combat or simply ends within a round or two, the effect will be negligible, and likely less helpful than if you'd used something else. It's not that great of a weapon for a Sloop or a Brig because they can't survive long battles even when it's mostly going in their favor, but once you get your hands on a Frigate, Galleon, or even a Man-o-War it's a top choice.
-Double Shot, on the other hand, is a great early game option because of how much it can increase your damage. If you can find a cannon upgrade for your Sloop or you buy a Brig it's even better, because then you can roll a pair of skulls which Double Shot turns into four hits - a massive hit no matter what ship is on the receiving end.
-Caltrops are an excellent choice for anyone that prefers boarding to cannon fire, and can be a decisive factor in the opening round of crew combat. As an added bonus you can combine it with Grappling Hooks, and even if that's still not enough to win the Seamanship roll it's never wasted, because it gives you a much better chance of winning the next round.



Module 3 - New Ship Mods
Four new ship mods are added to the game, and unlike the Special Weapons that are mostly for Pirates, these offer something for Merchants as well. Two of them, the Smuggling Hold and The Plank are meant for use with the Contraband and Loyalty modules (respectively), and should be left out if those aren't in use, but the Crow's Nest and Carved Hull can be used no matter which, if any, other modules are involved.

-Having someone up in the Crow's Nest greatly increases a ship's visibility, making it easier to find -or avoid- other ships. This is must-have upgrade for any captain with a low Scouting ability that still wants to try their hand at piracy, and it's just as great for Merchants who want to avoid battles whenever possible. Even Pirates who don't need the scouting help should consider it where there are a lot of angry Naval Ships lurking nearby.
-A Carved Hull helps a ship glide through the water more efficiently, which is another must-have for any captain that wants to avoid (or in this case escape) a battle, but it's also an excellent choice for highly-aggressive players who don't want their prey to escape. It can be particularly nasty when paired up with a set of Chasers.
-The Smuggling Hold is ideal for a Merchant that wants to take on some less-than-legal jobs while keeping their record clean, but it's great for Pirates too because it's almost like having another full cargo space upgrade (yes, you can have both at once). Contraband is just as likely to show up in raids as it is in any port, so having that extra space only increases a Pirate's potential plunder - assuming they they can get it where it needs to go.
-The Plank provides a valuable way to protect your ship when your crew get restless, and is a must-have whenever the Loyalty module is in use regardless of which side of the law you're on. There's nothing like a random execution to keep morale up, but if your captain is actually good at Leadership the mere threat of it can be enough.

The Ship Mod. Market is a very cool addition that, while technically optional, should be included as a standard rule any time you're using more than just the base set of ship mods. It's a really great way to keep injecting more and more of the upgrades into the game, and is especially good in three and four player games where ports tend to get cleaned out much more quickly than with fewer players. To a lesser extent, this also gives some incentive to pick up those less-desired mods like the swivel guns and chasers because then when you return to the port the next time you will (hopefully) be able to find something you want more.

The one caveat to using all of the extra ship mods is that it does reduce your chances of finding that one specific mod you really want. If your preferred playing style relies heavily on having the cargo upgrade, the extra cannon, advanced rigs & sails, or whatever else, you could be in trouble especially if the random placement means that mod isn't even on the board initially.



Module 4 - NPC Upgrades
Players get a lot of new toys to help them in their quest for Glory, but the NPCs aren't just taking it lying down. They now have upgrades of their own, which work exactly the same as the upgrades available to players. Most will get a single random upgrade, but there's a small chance of a ship having two or not getting one at all. Collectively it provides more diversity to the NPCs in play that goes above and beyond their Captains' stats, but more importantly it increases their difficulty.

This module is not for the faint of heart, and players who are new to the game, are inexperienced with ship-to-ship combat, or regularly struggle with even the "plain" NPC ships may want to leave it out for a while.

If you are willing to take them on and you happen to capture an upgraded NPC ship, as a nice bonus you get to keep whatever upgrade(s) it had in addition to the usual plunder.



All five player ships lined up. The new Brig is in the center.
Module 5 - Ships
This module has two aspects, a modification to the Galleon and a brand new ship, the Brig.

Players familiar with the Cutthroat Variant from the official FAQ have already seen and probably have even used the modified Galleon before, but now the actual adjusted cards are available. Reducing its maneuverability to 1 is a simple, but significant change, because it makes the ship far less viable to Pirates. It's still decent for fighting other players and NPCs, but it's not going to be much use in Merchant Raids even if you do manage find the Rigs & Sails upgrade. Most experienced players will tell you that the Frigate was the better Pirate ship anyways, but this change cements it. Even if you don't use the Brig, switching these cards out permanently is highly recommended just to make ship choices more interesting.

The Brig presents a new ship option for players in the early and mid game, and fits nicely into the range between the starter ships (Sloop and Flute) and the larger ships (Frigate, Galleon, and MoW). It's a sort of hybrid, "jack of all trades" ship that offers something for everyone, so it's worth considering no matter which side of the law you're on.

For a Pirate in a Sloop, at the cost of a single point of maneuverability you gain an additional cannon which helps quite a bit in both raids and combat, but more importantly you gain two cargo spaces. That makes delivering three-of-a-kind cargo sets a viable option, when in the past you'd need to either find the cargo upgrade or wait until you had a larger ship.

For a Merchant, you give up a little bit of toughness (Hull & Masts), but in exchange you gain a crew, a cannon, and some maneuverability, all of which makes it a far more survivable ship than the starting Flute. It's extra peace of mind when there are Pirates (both NPC and players) lurking about, because you won't be at such a huge disadvantage if attacked, plus it gives you the option to engage in some raiding if you find your cargo delivery options limited or if you're just ready for a career change.

No matter what your style of play, the Brig is priced just low enough that with a really good early raid or cargo delivery you could potentially buy one within the first two or three turns of the game, but because it doesn't provide a Glory Point when purchased and the resale value is no better than a base ship, sometimes you'll just want to skip it and wait until you can jump straight into one of the larger ships. It's a great enough ship that it's always worth considering, but it's not so good or so essential that you absolutely need it every time, so it fits that mid-range role perfectly.

The miniature itself is of a similar level of quality and detail as all of the others in the game, and it fits nicely within the lineup of others. Expect to see some lovely painted versions in the image gallery here in the near future, but even unpainted it looks great.



Module 6 - Treasure Galleon
The Treasure Galleon presents an interesting long-term target for players. In the early game it's just an extra (non-threatening) NPC to move around, but as the game goes on and it amasses more and more wealth, at some point players will start to seriously consider going after it.

The Treasure Galleon moves in a semi-random fashion based on the icons that appear on non-NPC Event cards, and over time it can end up anywhere on the board. Some games it'll just keep circling around near where it started, but I've also seen it make it as far as St.John and Trinidad. Each time it moves it collects more gold, so the further it moves the better a target it becomes.

With a Seamanship of 3 and the strength of a Galleon it's no pushover, but to a properly-equipped or daring Pirate it can be worth the effort to go after it. Even if it ends up surviving the entire game, the extra ship on the board adds to the overall visual appeal of the game making it even more beautiful to look at.

The Treasure Galleon is a simple enough module that as long as at least one player is already familiar with the game it can be added without any problems whatsoever. If your group is made up entirely of new players you might want to leave it out for the first play or two just so there's one less thing to keep track of each round.



Module 7 - Contraband
If I had to pick one favorite module out of this entire expansion, this is it. Contraband presents a new alternative to standard cargo, and is an equally great option for both Merchants and Pirates.

The Contraband cards get mixed in with all of the standard cargo cards and for the most part function exactly the same. They're affected by supply and demand just like the others, and even work the same way in raids. What sets them apart is the extra bit of text on each that lists some sort of illegal item and the name of a Port. If you ignore that text you can handle them as standard cargo, or if you want to try smuggling you can buy it for 3 gold and set it in the Contraband slot on your player board. Do that and you can't sell it as normal cargo anymore, but if you deliver it to the specific post listed it'll be worth a whopping 10 gold. Deliver Contraband twice (not necessarily at the same time) and it's worth a Glory Point too!

Smuggling is not without risks, though. Even if you're a merchant with no bounties, if you try to slip past a Naval ship while carrying Contraband it will scout for you, and if it finds you you'll have to either dump the illegal goods and run or you'll be branded a Pirate and will have to fight to keep it.

For Merchants, Contraband is a great alternative to look at when searching for sets of three matching goods. Often you can only find a pair and need a secondary source of income until you find that elusive third, and Contraband can fit the bill nicely. Other times you have your set of three but still have an extra cargo space or two to fill, so Contraband is the perfect option to fill up your ship. Find yourself a Smuggling Hold and you can run those illegal goods with impunity, just as long as you don't get greedy and take on too much at once.

For Pirates, Contraband is perhaps even better, because they can take advantage of all of the benefits and don't need to worry about the negatives at all. Those Naval ships are chasing after them anyways, and couldn't care less what kind of cargo they're carrying. Meanwhile, Pirates can find Contraband in raids just as easily as anyone can in a port, and if it can be unloaded somewhere nearby it provides a much greater payout in gold than even a demanded good, not to mention an additional source of Glory. This is especially useful early on when Pirates generally don't have the cargo space available to create sets of three.

There are two Contraband cards for each of the sixteen ports on the board, which is enough to increase the size of the original cargo deck by half. They maintain the same ratio of standard goods AND the raid icons on the bottoms of the cards, so there's absolutely no reason to leave (or take) these cards out. Shuffle them into the deck immediately and never look back.

If you don't want to use the Contraband Module, simply ignore the extra bit of text on the cards and treat them exactly the same as standard cargo. New players may want to hold off on using Contraband for the first play or two just because there are already so many other options available to you each turn, and throwing this into the mix could add to the feeling of being overwhelmed, but once you've got the basics down getting this module in should be a priority. It's so simple, so seamless, and such a great addition that it needs to be a permanent part of the game.



Module 8 - Wind and Weather
Players have wanted wind to play a part in the game since the beginning, and while a handful of cards have alluded to it, it never played a significant part in the game. This module changes that, by adding a persistent effect that continues through the entire game. It's a two-part module that could be technically split apart, but is best left together.

The first part is the wind, which is represented by the large spinner included in the box. Just before drawing the next Event card, you establish the direction the wind will be blowing for the entire round. Any player that sails with the wind gains a free bonus movement for the turn, but sailing directly against the wind slows you down and requires an extra movement to do it. Movements in the other six directions are unaffected. The overall effect on the game is somewhat small because most of the time you can still get to where you need to go even if that means taking a slightly different route, but every so often you have a turn where gaining that one extra move can really help you out, either by allowing you to escape imminent danger or to reach that important next destination an entire turn sooner. It's not always helpful, though, as occasionally you'll find yourself pinned in a corner and what would normally have been the perfect escape route just happens to be going directly into the wind.

The second part of this module is the Storm, which is represented by the Cloud token that roams around the board for the entire game. It moves each time the wind changes (in the direction of the wind), and much like the Treasure Galleon can end up anywhere during the game. For the most part it's an extra obstacle to avoid unless you're feeling particularly brave or you're in a really big hurry to get somewhere, but it's not all bad. NPC ships in the same sea-zone as the Storm never scout for players, so sometimes sailing straight into a storm can be worth it because it gets you past that far more dangerous Frigate or Man-o-War that was just waiting to pounce.

Like the Treasure Galleon and all of the other new elements to the game, the storm cloud adds a lot to the visual appeal and helps make the board look that much more alive and vibrant. Even the spinner itself looks great sitting on or next to the main board.

New players should probably leave this module out for the first few plays. It doesn't add a lot of complexity, but it does increase the difficulty ever so slightly, it complicates the decision-making and path-finding process a bit, plus it's extra stuff to track and maintain each turn. Experienced players should enjoy this module quite a bit, both for the benefits it can provide and the extra touch of realism.



Module 9 - Locations
Getting into the complicated stuff now, the Locations module is probably my second-favorite of all the new ones. What they essentially do is give each sea-zone a secondary ability that's available in addition to the one already printed on the board. There are two of each type of Location in the game, and they're randomly distributed during setup so every time you play the layout and opportunities will be different. To use a Location's effect you can visit it as an action without having to enter the port, and the benefits vary greatly:

-A Pirate Haven is a great place for Pirates (only) to replace lost crew for free, and is a way to gain information (Rumors) even if their Influence is so low that no one else ever wants to talk to them.
-The Missionary is where you'll want to go if you need a break from Piracy or if you're an otherwise "honest" Merchant that has maybe made a few mistakes along the way. Much like the Pardon Glory Cards or the Clemency Events, it's a way to wipe away bounties and get a fresh start - but only if you're willing to "donate" enough Gold.
-Visiting a Trade Station or Town works somewhat like a port action, albeit with some significant limitations. However, even with the restrictions, they can still save you a lot of time by allowing you to quickly load or unload goods without having to enter the port itself. One particularly neat trick with them is to make a stop there just after leaving the main port to get a second look at cargo cards. Maybe they'll have that third card you needed to complete your set of three demanded in the next port over, or they'll have some Contraband that'll increase your payout when you get there.
-A Native Village can be a lifesaver if you've been roughed up by NPCs, other players, Raids, or even bad weather, but you can't make it all the way to Petite Goave or Old Providence. As long as you have some cargo to give to the Natives, they'll fix up your entire ship. Good deal! If you happen to come across the White Lady Rumor from the base game, be especially on the lookout for the nearest Native Village.
-A Naval Fort can be an immensely powerful weapon for a Merchant that's sick of being harassed by Pirates, because they use it to send Naval Ships directly at the Pirates. If there isn't already one on the board that matches the nationality of the Fort's sea zone, you can even pull one from the deck. Take that, Pirates!
-A Prison is the ideal place to go if you're looking for a nice advantage over the other players, beyond buying ship mods or special weapons. In this case, it's a way to get more Specialists in the game without waiting for them to find their way out by earning Glory Cards. Pay 5 Gold to bail someone out and they'll happily join your crew.
-Last but not least, Reefs work a bit different from the other locations by allowing you to push your luck to find all sorts of useful items in the wreckage of lost ships. You start by searching (Scouting) to see if there's anything useful, and then if you do find something you can risk damage to your ship (Seamanship) to claim it. It's an excellent place to pick up all sorts of "freebies", just as long as you don't get too greedy and wreck your own ship in the attempt.

If you're feeling a bit more violent, you also have the option to Raid any of the locations (other than the Reef). Location Raids work somewhat like a Merchant Raid but with several major differences, one of the biggest being that you cannot use any of your Special Weapons. At all. Instead, you start by drawing a set number of Cargo cards (the number varies by location), and then you get to use your cannons to bombard it from offshore to remove some cards. You can only remove them - there's no way to add or change them, like in a Merchant Raid. Once you're satisfied with the result, you send in your crew to clean up the defenders and loot whatever your cannons didn't blow away. Anyone can do a Location Raid, and while you'll probably already be a Pirate when you make your first attempt in a game, these make a particularly good alternative for Merchant-oriented Captains that really, really want to be a Pirate but have such poor Scouting they couldn't find a Merchant if it sailed right alongside, or their Seamanship is so low that they can find a way to run their ship aground in the middle of the Caribbean Sea. Leadership, Crew, and Cannons are what matter most here.

One additional aspect of Location Raids is that once completed, the token gets removed from the board. If another player is using one or two of them a bit too much, you can sail in and destroy it to deny them access to it for the rest of the game.


When the Locations have all been set out on the board it really makes things look active, and maybe even borders on a little too busy. The tokens are fairly large, so in a few of the sea-zones it can be a bit of a tough fit, but even so, these are still well worth including in the game.

New players will of course want to leave these out for a few plays because the sheer number of extra options they present can quickly overwhelm, but experienced players should enjoy using these most, if not all, of the time they play. Even if you end up ignoring them for the entire game, just having the options there can be really helpful.



Module 10 - Favors
If you've ever felt like there was too much luck involved in the game, Favors is the module for you. They represent your various contacts and other allies scattered throughout the various ports, as well as some straight-up bribes. They're relatively easy to obtain (the vast majority will be purchased in port), and they're helpful in a wide variety of different situations. You can use them to pull some strings when you need a re-roll of a non-combat die (perfect for acquiring and attempting Rumors and Missions), when you want to redraw an entire stack of cards (great for shopping and in Raids), or when you want to try to convince an NPC to leave you alone. Perhaps most importantly of all, you can trade in favors to gain access to illegal ports. This means that as long as you've planned ahead a bit, every port on the board is available to you again no matter which Merchants you've attacked, which NPCs you've battled, or who is at war. You still need to be a little bit selective about who you attack because having multiple bounties from a nation will increase the cost to get in, but considering that in the past you'd be completely shut out of some ports (barring a Pardon or a handful of other effects), this is a massive change, especially with Contraband in the mix.

While Favors can be considered a money sink, their benefits far outweigh their cost so players should always considering investing in a few. You don't need to buy all the way up to the maximum of five unless you absolutely need to get into the port of a nation you've really pissed off, or you have a large stack of gold burning a hole in your hull, but carrying at least two or three at all times should be more than enough to get you through to the next port.


Despite the advantages, Favors do add a fair amount of complexity to the game so new players should definitely leave this module out until they've mastered the basics and fully understand the value of picking your targets carefully. Some hardcore players might actually want to pull this one out after a few plays if they feel it makes certain aspects too easy, but for the most part once you add this module in you'll want to keep it in because it's so useful to Pirates and Merchants alike.



Module 11 - Loyalty
The final module in the expansion is Loyalty, which represents the morale of your crew. It is definitely the most complex of them all, and adds the most difficulty. It's also likely to be the most divisive module among gaming groups, with some that will love it and some that will absolutely hate it.

As long as you can keep your crew happy they'll reward you greatly, but if you fall behind and they start to get angry you'll suffer increasing penalties, and ultimately could lose your ship (and life!) to an all-out mutiny.

You can raise the crew's morale by performing Glorious deeds or by simply paying them when you make a stop in port. It's worth paying them every chance you get as long you can afford it, because only bad things can happen if you let it slide.

Your crew's morale can go down in several different ways:
1) Every time a new NPC Event card is drawn. This represents the simple passing of time and growing fear, and does include the ones added by non-NPC cards and Naval Forts, so watch out for those!
2) Before Stashing Gold. Your crew will notice if you're stashing away extra fortune rather than paying them. They may not say anything to your face, but they'll let you know in other ways.
3) Starting and ending a port in the same turn. Watch out, Port-Hoppers! If you're one of those timid Merchants that's so afraid of Pirates (other players) that you only leave port when you can make it all the way to the next one, you're in for a rude awakening. Your crew HATE sitting idle, and will make you suffer for it.


New players should stay far away from the Loyalty module because it adds a sizable chunk of extra stuff to manage every turn, and it can be absolutely brutal if you're not prepared to deal with it right from the start of the game. If there's a large cluster of NPC cards in the Event deck, especially in the first few turns of the game, it can really put the hurt on everyone. Even experienced players will probably want to leave this one out for their first expansion play or two so there's more time to explore all of the other new components.

Those warnings aside, this is one of the most powerful and rewarding modules of all. Once you get the hang of using it and can consistently stay on the high end, you'll be at a considerable advantage. The free recruitment alone can quickly pay for itself, but the real bonus is at the very top where you can generate entire extra actions with just a Leadership roll. In the past they only way to do that was to use the Perfect Navigation Glory card, but those were few and far between and could only be used once. Fierce Loyalty gives you the potential to do it every single turn, just as long as you're able to keep gaining Glory or you pay off your crew to keep their Loyalty at its peak.


The Contraband, Favors, and Loyalty modules each add an extension to the original player boards, and the artwork on them lines up cleanly to make a continuous picture. It even "loops" from one end to the other so the Favor board can be attached on either end (depending on preference, and whether or not Loyalty is in use) and it still fits like it belongs. The Contraband board also includes spaces for most of the new Ship Mods, the new Special Weapons, and Glory Cards, so you'll probably want to include it even if you're not using that module.
Expanded Player Board


Variants
Five official variants are included, and some will already be familiar to players:

The first is Flexible Turns, which is intended to help reduce the feeling of downtime by mixing up the turn order. Each round you draw cubes (one per player color) from a nice-quality draw bag, and when your color comes up it's your turn. This gives the very real possibility that another player will get to take two turns in a row before your next one, or vice-versa. Everyone still gets the exact same number of turns, it's just the order the changes.

The second variant is Captains, Captains, Captains, which is already a very common house rule. Instead of just drawing a single Captain card, you get two and can choose which you want to use. This gives players some added control over their role for the game, so there's less chance of getting stuck as a Merchant when you really wanted to be a Pirate. A secondary version of this is also included where you get a single normal draw, but then have the option to pay out of your starting (10) Gold for additional draws.

The third variant, Give Me Glory or Give Me Death addresses the concerns from some players that the game often ends just when it's getting the most exciting, because some player with 5 Glory Points on the board raced home and dumped 50 Gold into their stash. What this does is incrementally increase the cost of each stashed point, so that same stashing strategy ends up costing significantly more. That in turn gives (and forces) players to put more "real" Glory Points on the board. This variant is highly recommended, although be warned that it will add a considerable amount to the overall play time.

Variant 4, It's a Hard Life puts several NPC ships on the board at the start of the game, which greatly increases the initial activity and increases the difficulty. New players will likely want to skip this one, but otherwise this should be almost mandatory for two-player (and single-player) games so the board doesn't feel so empty and you never have situations where there's zero threat from NPCs. In four-player games you might want to skip it as well, just so things don't feel too crowded at the start.

The fifth, the Cutthroat Variant should already be well-known to anyone that has seen the Official FAQ from the base game. What it does is allow players to Scout for others when it isn't their turn, at the cost of two actions on their following turn. It's a good way to address issues with timid, port-hopping merchants, and greatly increases direct player interaction. Highly-aggressive players will definitely enjoy this, but if you prefer a more peaceful game you'll want to avoid it. Note that original version of this variant also included the Maneuverability adjustment to the Galleon (from 2 to 1), but that part has been omitted here because it's now listed as part of the Ships module. If you happen to be playing this without allowing the Brig as an option, it's still highly recommended that you include that reduction.



The Bottom Line

Simply put, Seas of Glory is an amazing expansion that sets a new benchmark for what any game expansion should do.

It's an expansion that wasn't needed, but it is one that was wanted. Merchants & Marauders wasn't perfect, but it was about as close as any game could be expected to get. Nothing was broken, nothing needed "fixing", and nothing was missing. It could have stood as one of the top board games for countless more years exactly as it was. Yet, with all great things, there's always that desire for more, and Christian Marcussen has delivered in a big way.

There's something here for everyone, whether it's your very first time trying the game or if you've played countless times before. If you prefer to sail around in relative peace you'll have new options and opportunities, or if you want all sorts of new toys and targets to become an even greater pirate, you'll find that too. Because of the fully modular setup, you can add as much or as little as you like. If there's a part you don't like as much as the rest you can simply leave it out, or if you just want some variety you can easily swap one for anther. If you want the full, epic experience, you can use it all.

PROS:
thumbsup Adds more of almost everything, and so very much more.
thumbsup The "sandbox" gets a whole lot bigger, with many more options available to you each turn.
thumbsup It doesn't fundamentally change how the game is played. There's a lot more you can do, but everything you used to be able to do is still there pretty much as it was.
thumbsup The modules blend seamlessly with the base game and each other in any combinations.
thumbsup The modules are easy to add or remove as desired.
thumbsup The new miniatures and tokens look just as great as the originals.
thumbsup All of the new things that go on and next to the board add to the visual appeal, making this already gorgeous game even more beautiful to look at.
thumbsup There's not a single "dud" in the bunch. You might not like all of the modules equally, and some will certainly see more use than others, but they all have value and all serve their purposes well.
thumbsup Does not substantially increase play time. With the exception of the "Give Me Glory or Give Me Death" variant, none of the modules add more than a couple minutes to the overall play time, and with that added time divided across multiple rounds, you're looking at just a few extra seconds per turn. Unless you're doing something silly like playing this game with a Chess clock or a stopwatch, you're not even going to notice the additional time.


CONS:
thumbsdown Adds quite a bit of complexity to the game. If you or members of your group were already feeling overwhelmed by the sheer number of options in the base game, this will only increase that feeling. You'll want to ease the new stuff in very slowly and very carefully.
thumbsdown The colors of the card backs don't match perfectly with the same decks from the base set (First Edition, at least - more recent reprints may be fine). They are distinguishable if you're looking for it, but fortunately the way those cards are used in the game there are no advantages whatsoever to be gained by knowing if the next card is from the base game or the expansion.
thumbsdown The artwork style on the new Captain cards is slightly different from the original captains, and a few of them look somewhat anachronistic. Despite what some complaints might have you believe this is really very minor, but if it actually does bother you that much, just cover them up, leave them in the box, or make your own replacements.
It all fits, but just barely.
thumbsdown Fitting everything into the base game's box is tricky, to say the least. It can be done, but takes some effort. You may need to get rid of the insert if you haven't already, or plan on keeping some stuff in the expansion's box.
thumbsdown Setup and take-down times increase because there are a lot more components now. You can minimize this by keeping each type of token sorted in its own bag (or compartment in a Plano box) and by getting the other players to help. Hopefully you've already been doing something like this with the base game, but if not, now's a good time to start.
thumbsdown It doesn't include an official Solo variant, but if you do want a set that already takes into account everything new in the expansion, try this: M&M - Solo Rules
thumbsdown It doesn't add a Fifth-player option. Even though this was an often-requested feature, it was never seriously considered because of cost implications and because of the negative effect it would have on game time. That being said, if you did happen to have access to a second copy of the game or even just some suitable replacement components, there's no reason you couldn't add a fifth or even sixth player yourself. Incidentally, with the new miniatures that did get added, it's now just a Flute away from having a complete set of black ships.


Final Word
If you've tried the base game but didn't care for it, Seas of Glory isn't likely to change your mind so don't expect it to, but if you weren't quite sure one way or the other this may be exactly what is needed to push you in the right direction.

If you're already a fan of Merchants & Marauders, you're going to love this expansion. Go out and get yourself a copy right now, if you haven't already. It is worth every penny.


Thanks for reading.
arrrh

Sea of Glory as it looked a year ago.
Seas of Glory now.



Edits for typos and formatting.
  • [+] Dice rolls
Reverend Uncle Bastard
Canada
Windsor
Ontario
flag msg tools
badge
Unapologetic Continual Troublemaker!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Already purchased this, was a must have, but this is a great review. I agree with the whole thing. If you like this game, this is a must have. Reasonably priced too! Also, thanks again for the solo rules, simple and fun!
17 
 Thumb up
1.01
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Christian Marcussen
Denmark
Odense C
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Very nice! And that last image of the prototype and final product compared is great.

Thank you for the review, and thank you for all your time, effort and feedback when testing!

arrrh
39 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bryce K. Nielsen
United States
Elk Ridge
Utah
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Now that was a review. Picked this up too, and while it's been too long since M&M has hit the table, I hope it happens soon.

-shnar
12 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tor Gjerde
Norway
Trondheim
Unspecified
flag msg tools
designer
https://landnam.old.no
badge
https://old.no
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
As another playtester, this review captures my experience precisely. Just to reiterate a couple of points in my own words:

I just love the Brig. It’s been quite some time since playtesting started now, but if I recall, it was never tweaked in any way. It shone from the very beginning, not because it was in any way overpowered, but precisely because it changed the progression of ship types from almost scripted to very open with different viable options. When it seemed certain that a new miniature would be too costly, my opinion was that even if it would have to be proxied by the Flute, the ship card really needed to be included in the expansion.

There was more back-and-forth to get Contraband to work smoothly, but from early on it was clear that the feel of the game benefitted greatly from introducing a shade of grey between the lily-white mechant career and sailing under the black flag.

When we started, I was especially excited about the possibilities of new Ship Mods. Disappointingly, for quite a while I was discontent with the details of each of the suggested ones; but as these were battled out during playtesting, all of them ended up great. Crow’s Nest is extremely useful but not overpowered and Carved Hull makes the Escape option which is under-utilised in the base game in my group much more viable. Smuggling Hold and the Plank are among the few things that have inter-module dependencies. Generally avoiding this was a necessary decision even if it blocked several creative possibilities; but in this case it is very much worth the little bit of set-up fiddliness it adds.

Given my love for Ship Mods, it is no surprise that NPC upgrades was an immediate hit for me. There is always a bit of suspense in drawing an Event Card, but when it is a ship that doesn’t appear until the next round, players tend to mainly care about where it will appear, and whether it is black or brown (at least until they are strong enough to look closely at the stats to see what their chances in a combat are). The simple additional process of picking a token for each new ship adds another moment of suspense, and helps give each new ship an individual identity.

I am a little bit concerned about the size of the Location markers. This is among the more complex modules, so it will probably not be included in every game, even though it yet another of my favourite parts, but when it is used it will make the board very crowded in places. If this turns out to bother me once I get my hands on my own copy and get to try it out, I might revisit my compact design used during playtesting and post it here on BGG.

– Donatus van ’t Hof
31 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tom Howard
United States
Marina del Rey
California
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Wonderful review. I recently got my copy in and can't wait to get it to the table!
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Emil Juul Jacobsen
Denmark
København S
Denmark
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Still eagerly waiting for this to reach Denmark Give the sailors shipping it an extra ration of grog
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Renni Honkanen
Finland
Helsinki
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Aaaarrr! Now I just cant wait to get this on my shelf and table! Thanks for a very thorough review
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jeff Hale
United States
Harvest
Alabama
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmb
We played with the expansion the first time this weekend with all the modules except the "Loyalty" and Treasure Galleon. Contraband, and Locations were big hits and favors was useful a time or two. As a pirate, I had two quick successful merchant raids and quickly got into a Brig which I kept and won the game in. We were kind of meh on the Wind and Weather, but that could be because it nailed 2 players hard right at the beginning. However, the game looked amazing on the table and the new ship boards and new stuff on the board. For a game I already loved, my first impression of this expansion is it makes a great game even better!!!
10 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Christian Marcussen
Denmark
Odense C
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks Jeff.

I can't wait to read about what stories the expansion will help create. I love reading session reports from M&M more than any other game out there. The ability to create interesting narratives even suprises me from time to time.
15 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
ian o
Canada
Saskatchewan
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Very comprehensive review. We have just startd playing M&M so not sure if we're ready to expand yet, but i will certainly pick this up in the future if i can.

Glad to hear that it will fit in the box (maybe). Can I leave the insert in? (i hate getting rid of inserts)
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Steve Williams
United States
Columbus
Ohio
flag msg tools
BITS FOR THE BITS GOD!
badge
Staring in dumbfounded terror at Frans Raynor's neckbeard.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
gjerde wrote:
I just love the Brig. It’s been quite some time since playtesting started now, but if I recall, it was never tweaked in any way.

The Brig actually underwent as many or more tweaks than any other component, but they were all early on in the process. I hope to go over it in some detail whenever I get around to posting my own introspective...

~Stephane Guillaume
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kyle
United States
Up Nort' Der
Wisconsin
flag msg tools
designer
VAST:                The Crystal Caverns   The Fearsome Foes  The Mysterious Manor
badge
DV: Anakin Skywalker was weak. I destroyed him.                 AT: Then I will avenge his death.             DV: Revenge is not the Jedi way.             AT: I am no Jedi.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Wow, I'm blown away by the response! Thanks everyone!


marqzen wrote:
Very nice! And that last image of the prototype and final product compared is great.

Thank you for the review, and thank you for all your time, effort and feedback when testing!

arrrh
You're welcome, and thank you for the opportunity to help create such an awesome expansion! I'm proud to see my name listed in the credits. meeple

gjerde wrote:
I am a little bit concerned about the size of the Location markers. This is among the more complex modules, so it will probably not be included in every game, even though it yet another of my favourite parts, but when it is used it will make the board very crowded in places. If this turns out to bother me once I get my hands on my own copy and get to try it out, I might revisit my compact design used during playtesting and post it here on BGG.
They're quite a bit bigger than I was expecting too, but they still work pretty well. Petite Goave is the only sea zone where space really gets tight, because elsewhere you've got an entire edge of the board to work with or just a large open area.

IncrediSteve wrote:
gjerde wrote:
I just love the Brig. It’s been quite some time since playtesting started now, but if I recall, it was never tweaked in any way.

The Brig actually underwent as many or more tweaks than any other component, but they were all early on in the process. I hope to go over it in some detail whenever I get around to posting my own introspective...
Originally it was intended to be a third option when buying a large ship. The problem was that every iteration of that tested ended up being too good, and then there was no reason to ever buy the Frigate anymore. Making it "worse" and dropping it down into that middle range is what made it really work best.
7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tor Gjerde
Norway
Trondheim
Unspecified
flag msg tools
designer
https://landnam.old.no
badge
https://old.no
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
IncrediSteve wrote:
gjerde wrote:
I just love the Brig. It’s been quite some time since playtesting started now, but if I recall, it was never tweaked in any way.

The Brig actually underwent as many or more tweaks than any other component, but they were all early on in the process. I hope to go over it in some detail whenever I get around to posting my own introspective...

~Stephane Guillaume

That probably explains it. I was originally in the "cabin boy" crew, but was "upgraded" to a real playtester after a while being the most active participant there. So if it is not just my memory playing tricks with me again, you must have reached a stable version of the Brig just before I switched. When brought to the local game club for full scale playtesting, it felt nothing like a compromise or "design by committee" but rather as a spark of inspiration.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kyle
United States
Up Nort' Der
Wisconsin
flag msg tools
designer
VAST:                The Crystal Caverns   The Fearsome Foes  The Mysterious Manor
badge
DV: Anakin Skywalker was weak. I destroyed him.                 AT: Then I will avenge his death.             DV: Revenge is not the Jedi way.             AT: I am no Jedi.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
gjerde wrote:
That probably explains it. I was originally in the "cabin boy" crew, but was "upgraded" to a real playtester after a while being the most active participant there. So if it is not just my memory playing tricks with me again, you must have reached a stable version of the Brig just before I switched. When brought to the local game club for full scale playtesting, it felt nothing like a compromise or "design by committee" but rather as a spark of inspiration.
The spark of inspiration was when we realized that it *shouldn't* be a third large ship. With the Glory point pulled and the resale value chopped, it fell right into place almost immediately at that point.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David F
United States
Emeryville
California
flag msg tools
Luck in games, in measured doses, is the catalyst which enables shocking game-changers that you'll remember and talk about forever.
badge
Let the Lord of Chaos rule.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I love the idea of an intermediate/transitory ship, but am a little dubious of the Brig so far (have seen 3 Captains buy it with poor results). Was there consideration to up its resale value to 10-15G so it'd be easier to transition to a big ship?

Some of the variants and modules can really swing the game with Captain or Location choice, which is unavoidable. For example, I noticed my Bruce (cannot Stash, but can use 30G on board as 3 GPs) would win so hard if we had used the Give me Glory or Give me Death module, and Old Providence was on steroids since I got to buy six Special Weapons for 1G each instead of three (compare to St. John where you can only buy 1 Ship Mod for 1G). Also a little weird that Curacao now offers discounts on Galleons & Frigates but not Brigs. And the Treasure Galleon is laughably weak if we use the new Galleon cards. I'll roll with it, but want to point out it's important to nail down what variants and modules you want to include before setting up the board and complaining when the guy with Bruce suddenly thinks Give Me Glory or Give me Death is the best idea ever.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David F
United States
Emeryville
California
flag msg tools
Luck in games, in measured doses, is the catalyst which enables shocking game-changers that you'll remember and talk about forever.
badge
Let the Lord of Chaos rule.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Excellent comprehensive review by the way! I wish more games can have these 'Playtester Notes' upon release to get an experienced perspective in early (albeit at the risk of causing groupthink).

I absolutely hate the idea of Favors (use up to 10G every Port action to restock your 5 cheat codes??) but simultaneously, it makes me like and respect the expansion even more, because it shows how the expansion is successfully trying to cater to different types of gamers. The bonus is that even my least favorite module and the three I'm not sure about (Weather, Loyalty, Locations) have excellent thematic justifications; I'm tempted to use them just for the narrative bonus.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
D. Fox
United States
Missouri
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb
Brilliant review. I would reiterate that playing with several of the modules lengthens play time quite significantly. This is absolutely perfect when playing with 2p, because games with just the base set could be over too quickly if one of the players just wants to be a port-hopping merchant and hits a couple of good runs of cargo 3-sets. The game is much more rich now, and the play extended if you go with some of the more advanced locations like Contraband, Wind & Weather and Locations.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Steve Williams
United States
Columbus
Ohio
flag msg tools
BITS FOR THE BITS GOD!
badge
Staring in dumbfounded terror at Frans Raynor's neckbeard.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
selwyth wrote:
Was there consideration to up its resale value to 10-15G so it'd be easier to transition to a big ship?

We tried it with 10, yes. Too Good. Became a no-brainer to buy it because there was so little drawback against your game-long gold income.

As a Ship it is recognizably better for a Pirate than a Merchant, and we were okay with that. It's still a solid option for a Merchant that needs protection from aggressive sloops, NPCs, or that wants to complete Missions. But for the Pirate, you no longer have to live in fear of a "Cannons" hit blowing your entire Merchant Raid, you gain some more hit locations so you can take more damage and continue raiding, and the increased hold size enabling you to keep more cargo from raids and maybe even get a 3-of-a-kind open up many new avenues of play.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andy Leber
Canada
Orillia
ON
flag msg tools
Yin
badge
Yang
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Sooooo excited.

I somehow only just discovered that this has finally been released.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Adam French
United States
Escondido
California
flag msg tools
mbmb
Great review! I have played a few of the new modules and am loving it!
We haven't tried buying the brig yet, I'll have to give it a go. I tried to be daring and go after the treasure galleon but my cousin who I was playing with was rolling crazy good that game. At one time he rolled two times with 5 dice and rolled 9 out of 10 skulls. Crazy! arrrh
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Phil Triest
Australia
Sydney
NSW
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Great review! Now there just seems to be way too much. All good though. It kind of reminds me of what the TI3 expansions brought with them. You likely won't play with everything but you can choose what suits you best after all
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andrew Adey
United Kingdom
Wolverhampton
West Midlands
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I splendid review my good fellow! Capital! Capital!

Have a shiny doubloon/geekgold, sir!

(Don`t ask where I got it...) arrrh
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Crazy Adam
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
Congratulations. You have just discovered the secret message.
badge
Please send your answer to Old Pink, care of the Funny Farm, Chalfont.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Just read this review today, Kyle. And just bought it.

Although M&M isn't a game I get to pull it that often (sadly) you really sold me on the expansion. I knew for a couple of years that you were helping to bring it to life and it's very nice to finally have it here!

See you on the sea sometime!
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls