Andrew Prizzi
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The 2nd part of Parker Brothers Star Wars Risk series has arrived.

Before I get into the rest of my review, here is my background with Risk and with Star Wars:

Risk background- I’ve played lots of regular Risk, mostly when I a kid but I still get in on a couple games a year at gatherings of extended family. I’ve also played Castle Risk, Lord of the Rings Risk, and Risk 2210. I’ve read the rules for Clone Wars Risk, but have never played the game. This review will assume that the reader has some familiarity with regular Risk. The Original Trilogy game comes with two sets of rules-“Classic Risk” and “Risk: Star Wars Original Trilogy”. Both differ somewhat from normal Risk, and I’ll be covering those differences.

Star Wars background- I enjoy Star Wars. I’ve seen the original 3 movies many times, and the prequels each about twice. I took part in a Star Wars RPG campaign for a few sessions once. I haven’t read any of the Star Wars novels or played more than a couple of the computer games. I consider myself a Star Wars fan but nowhere near an expert. Without looking it up in the game rules I couldn’t have told you that the Gamorreans were Gamorreans- I’d just have said “the warthoglike aliens from Jabba’s palace. The point is that I can’t comment on whether or not each planet is in the correct system, how “accurate” the Rebel trooper’s uniform is, or other more detailed Star Wars Universe questions.

Game Contents:
1. 1 mounted gameboard featuring the major planets of the original trilogy. The planets on the board are grouped into 6 Regions (think continents from normal Risk). These are Core Worlds, iSon Corridor, El’Rood Sector, Wild Space, Mid Rim, and Outer Rim. The board also has 2 status meters- one for tracking the Force and another for the number or resource planets controlled by the Hutts. Both of these meters are only used with the Star Wars rules. Finally, the board has a chart showing the number of troops received for trading in cards (used with both sets of rules.)

2. 5 sets of armies:
-2 Rebel Alliance Armies (1 Red, 1 Orange), each made up of 35 Rebel Trooper figures and 15 Snowspeeder figures.
-2 Empire Armies (1 Gray, 1 White), each made up of 35 Stormtrooper figures, 15 AT-ST figures, and 1 Death Star figure.
-1 Hutt Army (Green) made up of 35 Gamorrean Guard figures and 15 Rancor figures.
So you get a total of 252 minis. They are all hard plastic and well detailed.

3. 45 cardboard ship tokens (9 of each Empire or Rebel color and 9 for the Hutts). Each ship token has a picture of a ship on one side and a description of its abilities on the other. The side with the description is color coded to match a set of armies.

4. 3 decks of faction cards. Each deck (Empire, Rebel, and Hutt) has 27 cards.
5. 5 six-sided dice and 4 eight-sided dice.
6. 5 cardboard Imperial base tokens
7. 3 cardboard asteroid field tokens
8. 1 24-page full color rule booklet
9. 1 plastic storage insert for keeping components sorted in the box.


Standard Risk Rules
Again, I’m assuming you know how to play regular Risk. I’m only going to cover how the “Standard” rules that come from this game differ form regular Risk.

1.Number of players. The Standard rules are only written for playing with 3 or 4 players. It would seem simple to set up a neutral army to play a 2 player game though. The rules don’t support 5 players even though there are 5 armies because of the limited supply of pieces.

2.Trading in cards for troops. The amount of troops received for trading in card sets does not keep going up throughout the game like it does in regular Risk. Depending on the set of cards turned in, trade ins are all worth either 4,5,6, or 7 troops.

3.Fortification move. The standard rules allow a player to make one “free move” to reinforce a territory at the end of their turn. This move may be of any distance as long as the player controls all the planets inbetween the 2 territories. This rule has been available as an option with many sets of regular Risk, but the normal rule allowed players to only “free move” into an adjacent territory.

Other than these items and a different layout of territories on the board, the standard rules play just like regular risk.

Star Wars Original Trilogy Rules (on to the good stuff!)

How to Win: Each faction (which may have 1 or 2 players) wins or loses as a team. The faction objectives are-
Empire: Wins the moment they eliminate all armies of the Rebellion
Rebellion: Wins the moment they eliminate all Imperial armies OR when they take control of the planet with the Emperor’s Imperial base token
Hutts: Win the moment they capture their 10th resource planet. Resource planets are outlined in green on the board. There are a total of 13 resource planets on the map.

My thoughts- Return of the Jedi is my favorite of the movies, so I’m very happy with the inclusion of the Hutts as their own player. I also like that Rebels’ overall mission is to kill the Emperor not destroy the Death Star as this fits in line with the movies as well- if you don’t kill the Emperor he’s just going to build another Death Star.

Setup: The rules call for the Hutts to be a neutral force in a 2 or 4 player game. This makes sense to me for a 2 player game, but since players on the same team are allowed to show each other their cards and discuss their plans, just not trade cards, I see no reason why you can’t have an active Hutt faction in a 4 player game, using the 5-player setup. One player would have to control the Empire or Rebellion by themselves and just keep their two hands of cards separate.

Unlike normal Risk, the players do not start off with equal forces or an equal number of territories. The specific vary depending on the number of players but the Hutts will have the fewest troops and fewest territories, then the Rebel Alliance, and finally the Empire with the most of both. Players take turns selecting their territories, so setup is variable. In a two or three player game the different color Rebel and Imperial armies are used interchangeably and Rebel/Empire players only manages one hand of cards.

Once all territories are claimed but before the rest of the starting armies are placed on the board, the Empire player(s) decide where to put the Death Star. Initially it must be placed in an Empire held territory, but during the game it can move into territories owned by other players as well. Only one Death Star is ever in use at a time. The 2nd Death Star figure is used to mark the Force Meter.

A Player Turn:
The order of play is set, with one of the Rebel players always going first. Here’s what you do on each of your turns:

1.Place Imperial Base Token (Empire Only). There are 6 Imperial base tokens. One has the emperor on it. These are shuffled and placed face down in a stack before the game. On each of the first 6 Imperial turns of the game, the Empire players draw the top one, look at it, and place it into an Empire controlled territory (can belong to either Empire player) face down. Planets with an Imperial base always roll 8 sided dice for defense. If the Rebels capture a base it is destroyed. If the base had the emperor the rebels win the game. If it was one of the other bases the force moves on space toward the light side. If the Hutts capture a planet with a base, the Imperial player(s) put the base into another territory. You are not allowed to put more than one base in the same territory unless you have no other option.

2.Count planets and regions. Players get reinforcements for the number of planets they own and bonuses for controlling an entire region just like normal Risk.

3.Turn in cards for ships or troops. A set of 3 cards can be turned in for reinforcements as described above in the standard rules. You are never forced to turn in card though like in normal risk, you can accumulate as many as you want in your hand. A player may turn in one card for a ship that matches the type on the card. This may be done in addition to trading a set for reinforcements. There are 3 types of ships:
a. Fighters- re-roll a die that is a one. Keep re-rolling until it is not a one.
b. Bombers- add 1 to a die roll starting with the highest.
c. Capital Ships- replace a 6 sided die with an 8 sided die
Ships can be used while attacking or defending. Multiple ships allow for multiple bonuses. Ships are NOT units and can’t occupy a territory by themselves. Defending ships are destroyed when a territory is lost. Each army has a pool of 3 ships for each type. Only 1 ship may be built each turn.

4.Place all ships and troops recruited into territories that you control.

5.Invade. This step follows the same rules as normal Risk, with the ship bonuses just described, and also with the possibility of faction card plays (described a little later). One new rule is added for how the Rebel or Hutt players can attack the Death Star. Since the Death Star can occupy friendly or enemy held spaces, it can be attacked from the space it is in or an adjacent space. Ships work the same way for the attacker as normal. The attacker rolls and if their total is 18 or higher the Death Star is destroyed and the force meter moves one towards the light side (the force meter doesn’t move if the Hutts destroy the Death Star). If the total roll is less than 18 the Rebel player loses 1 unit for each die that he rolled. The rebel player can keep making attempts as long as he has troops to do so with. Empire troops and ships on a planet may not be attacked if Death Star is in the territory. The Death Star must be destroyed (or moved) first. If the Force meter is towards the dark side, there is a penalty on the Death Star Attack roll. There is a bonus if the meter is towards the light side. If a player is eliminated during the game, any cards they held in their hand are put into the discard pile.

6.Troop fortification. This follows the standard game rules- allowing a “free move” between 2 territories as long as the player’s faction controls the territories in between. You may move THROUGH your teammates territories, but may not stop on them in this step.

7.Ship fortification: The player now gets one free move for ships, following the same rules as troops do. After fortifying your troops and ships, you may ask your teammate to allow you to take over one of his planets. You must have his permission, there may only be one troop on the planet, there can not be any kind of tokens there, and you may only do this for one planet each turn. If those restrictions are met, you simply replace your teammates’ troop with one of your own.

8.Death Star move (Empire Only): If there is a Death Star on the board, 1 6-sided die is rolled. The Death Star may move a number of territories up to the number rolled. If the active Empire player has the appropriate card, they may now fire the Death Star and destroy the planet it is on. All troops and ships on the planet are also destroyed. An asteroid field token is placed on the planet. This space can no longer be attacked or invaded through by either player (without the use of certain cards). The Death Star can still move through asteroid fields though.

9.Draw cards. At the end of your turn you get to draw one card from your faction deck for each other faction that you took a planet from on your turn. Example: Yellow Rebel player takes territories from the gray empire player, white empire player and the Hutt player. They get TWO cards at the end of their turn (one for the Empire and one for the Hutts.) The Rebel and Imperial players are able to draw 1 to 2 extra cards if the force is on their side of the force meter. The Hutt player is able 1 to 3 extra cards if they hold enough resource planets. Along with trading them in for troops or ships cards can be used to execute the special directive printed on the card. These are different for each faction and do a variety of things including: bonuses attacking or defending, recruiting more troops, moving troops around on the board, moving the force meter, building a Death Star, firing the Death Star, and several others. Each card says when a player may play it. Some are played during your turn and some during an opponents.


My Impressions:
So far I have only opened up the game, set everything up, and read through the rules several times. I haven’t had the chance to play yet, although I plan on doing so within the next day or 2. My overall initial impression is very favorable. The components are nice, the rules are easy to learn, and game looks like it will succeed at what it sets out to be- a very playable strategic level game of the war depicted in the original trilogy movies. If you don’t like games with lots of dice rolling this game will most likely not be for you. If you have a group of friends who know how to play Risk already you can explain the new rules to them in about 10 minutes. If that same group of friends enjoys Star Wars, I’d highly recommend this game. I see it getting a lot of play and being a lot of fun. Are there any components or game mechanics that are going to blow you away here? No, but I see much of the fun of this game coming from the interaction between the players. There is lots of potential for “gotcha!” moments with the faction cards, and there is LOTS of potential for people making Star Wars quotes and doing bad impressions: “THIS BATTLE STATION IS FULLY OPERATIONAL!!”, “Do or do not. There is no try.” Laughing like Jabba the Hutt, roaring like Chewie, etc. If you don’t know anything about Star Wars this could still be a fun game for you, but if you do enjoy the movies, and aren’t adverse to dice rolling, then this game looks like a real winner.

Questions and Concerns:
I just got done telling you that I’m happy with the game and I am. This is definitely a mass market game and most people who get it will play it many times without any questions or problems I think. The rules are well written. That being said, us BGGers, look at games differently than most people and ask more questions. Here’s the questions I’ve come up with. I don’t see any of them as game breakers and could easily make my own ruling on how to deal with them. The designers are active on BGG though, so maybe they will give me more of an “official” answer.

1.The rules say that each “army” is limited to 3 of each ship type. In a 2 or 4 player game, where the Rebel and Imperial troops are combined into one force pool, are those players still limited to 9 ships or can they use all 18 belonging to their side’s colors?

2.Are the faction decks recycled? This was one of the more important questions I came up with. I don’t see any mention on this either way in the rules. If the decks are recycled, I would have liked for the game to come with a few more asteroid field tokens (it comes with 3, and there are 3 Fire the Death Star cards in the deck.)

3.The rules as written allow for situations to occur where nobody wins the game. For the Empire to win THEY must wipe out the Rebels. For the Rebels to win THEY must wipe out the Empire or kill the Emperor. So, if the Hutts eliminate either the last rebel player or the last Imperial player- the remaining Empire/Rebel play can no longer possibly win. They could still wipe out the Hutts, resulting in nobody winning. If the “they” is not to be taken literally, then the game can end with multiple factions winning (if the Hutt player eliminates the last rebel or Empire planet at the same time they reach 10 resource planets). I don’t know how likely this situation is to occur, and there’s nothing intrinsically wrong with nobody winning. It just struck me as odd.

4.Several cards give bonuses that last for an entire invasion. The definition of “invasion” is in with the standard rules. The rules are perfectly clear, again they just struck me as odd. Assuming most people are more familiar with the normal Risk board- here’s an example: I’m attacking South Africa from Congo. I do this for a few rolls. I then start attacking South Africa from Madagascar. Per the rules with this game that is all part of the same invasion, so I’d still get any bonuses that last for the invasion. As long as I’m still attacking the same target territory, it’s all one invasion. If I stop, attack something else, and then come back later, it’s now a different invasion. If I hadn’t read that in the rules my own “Risk intuition” would have told me that one invasion stops and another starts when I changed from attacking with my Congo forces to my Madagascar forces.

5.Is it possible to collect the region (continent) bonus if one or more planets in the region have been destroyed with the Death Star? My answer would be “yes, you just have to control all the remaining planets in the region” but that would be entirely based off of my experience in Risk 2210 with nuclear wasteland tokens. I couldn’t find any ruling on this in the Original Trilogy rules.

6.Can you use the Death Star to destroy one of your own or your teammate’s planets? The rules prohibit attacking your teammate. The question is does firing the Death Star count as an “attack” or is that referring only to normal invasions with troops? The Death Star rules in the booklet and on the cards, simply say to destroy the planet the Death Star is on with no mention of who owns the planet. While “Fire the Death Star” cards are rare, under the right conditions one might want to blow up their own sides’ planet to block off a section of the board. Is this legal?

7.The shield generator and sarlac pit cards say that their effects last until the player loses all troops in one battle. Can these cards stay in play for more than one person's turn if it takes that long for the player who played them to meet that condition?

Availability: According to one of the designers who posted here on BGG earlier, this game will be exclusively sold at Toys R’ Us, at least for awhile. It is available on the Toys R’ Us website referred to as “Classic Trilogy” instead of “Original Trilogy”. Last I checked the game’s listing showed the cover image of the Clone Wars Risk, but the description for Original Trilogy and the board picture is of the original trilogy game. I ordered from this listing and got the right game. The UPC on the box is 653569037613 which is also the UPC at the online game listing, so it looks like they just have the wrong box picture up.

Thanks to the designers for what looks like a very fun game. I’ll post a session report once I get a game in.
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Andrew Prizzi
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Well, the wife wasn't up for a game this weekend, so I had to settle for soloing a 3 player game. The Hutts won on their 3rd turn. I won't draw too many conclusions until I get to play against an actual opponent though. Three additional comments:

1. If the decks are recycled, the Hutt player can be put into a situation where they are still alive but it's impossible for them to win the game. There are 13 resource planets on the board. If 4 of them are destroyed by the Death Star, it would be impossible for the Hutts to control the 10 needed for their victory condition.

2. If you want to play as the Hutts, you will have a much easier time in a 3 player game than you will in a 5 player game.

3-Player game: Hutts have 25 of 90 units on the board at start of the game (27.8%).

5-Player game: Hutts have 25 of 143 units on the board at start of the game (17.5%). In addition the Hutts go from having one out of every 3 turns to one out every 5 so they are losing a lot of ground in terms of number of card draws.

3. The extra armies that the Empire recieves at the start of the game don't seem to be any sort of advantage after all. The Rebels always go first so they get 5 armies at the start of their first turn for the territories they hold- putting them even with the Empire at 35 troops on the board (talking about a 3 player game). Personally, I'd rather go first and have my forces concentrated in fewer territories.

The advantages the Empire does have- Death Star, Force Meter starts out 1 step towards the Dark Side. I think the defensive powers of the Death Star (prevents any attacks against Empire troops on the same planet) may be as or more important than the ability to destroy planets.
 
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Dan Sanfilippo
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You have brought up some interesting scenarios. Rob and I have talked it over and proprose the following answers to your questions...

Quote:
1.The rules say that each “army” is limited to 3 of each ship type. In a 2 or 4 player game, where the Rebel and Imperial troops are combined into one force pool, are those players still limited to 9 ships or can they use all 18 belonging to their side’s colors?

In a 2 or 4 player game, each player is limited to 9 ships.

Quote:
2.Are the faction decks recycled? This was one of the more important questions I came up with. I don’t see any mention on this either way in the rules. If the decks are recycled, I would have liked for the game to come with a few more asteroid field tokens (it comes with 3, and there are 3 Fire the Death Star cards in the deck.)

Although it will be rare that you should go through an entire deck in one game, the faction decks should NOT be recycled when they are gone. When there are no cards left in your deck, you must continue the game without drawing any cards.

Quote:
3.The rules as written allow for situations to occur where nobody wins the game. For the Empire to win THEY must wipe out the Rebels. For the Rebels to win THEY must wipe out the Empire or kill the Emperor. So, if the Hutts eliminate either the last rebel player or the last Imperial player- the remaining Empire/Rebel play can no longer possibly win. They could still wipe out the Hutts, resulting in nobody winning. If the “they” is not to be taken literally, then the game can end with multiple factions winning (if the Hutt player eliminates the last rebel or Empire planet at the same time they reach 10 resource planets). I don’t know how likely this situation is to occur, and there’s nothing intrinsically wrong with nobody winning. It just struck me as odd.

In this situation, we think that if the Rebellion is eliminated, the Empire should win, regardless of who eliminates them, and vice versa. However, in a situation where there could be 2 winners (the Hutts take their 10th resource planet by eliminating the last Rebel forces on that planet) the winner would be the player whose turn it currently is. So, the Hutts would win in that situation.

Quote:
4.Several cards give bonuses that last for an entire invasion. The definition of “invasion” is in with the standard rules. The rules are perfectly clear, again they just struck me as odd. Assuming most people are more familiar with the normal Risk board- here’s an example: I’m attacking South Africa from Congo. I do this for a few rolls. I then start attacking South Africa from Madagascar. Per the rules with this game that is all part of the same invasion, so I’d still get any bonuses that last for the invasion. As long as I’m still attacking the same target territory, it’s all one invasion. If I stop, attack something else, and then come back later, it’s now a different invasion. If I hadn’t read that in the rules my own “Risk intuition” would have told me that one invasion stops and another starts when I changed from attacking with my Congo forces to my Madagascar forces.

The rules clearly state that an invasion refers to the planet being invaded and not the planets from which you are invading.

Quote:
5.Is it possible to collect the region (continent) bonus if one or more planets in the region have been destroyed with the Death Star? My answer would be “yes, you just have to control all the remaining planets in the region” but that would be entirely based off of my experience in Risk 2210 with nuclear wasteland tokens. I couldn’t find any ruling on this in the Original Trilogy rules.

Yes. You still collect the region bonus if you occupy all the remaining “undestroyed” planets in a region.

Quote:
6.Can you use the Death Star to destroy one of your own or your teammate’s planets? The rules prohibit attacking your teammate. The question is does firing the Death Star count as an “attack” or is that referring only to normal invasions with troops? The Death Star rules in the booklet and on the cards, simply say to destroy the planet the Death Star is on with no mention of who owns the planet. While “Fire the Death Star” cards are rare, under the right conditions one might want to blow up their own sides’ planet to block off a section of the board. Is this legal?

Good question. The rules state that you may not “attack” your teammate, but in this game, destroying a planet with the Death Star is not considered an “attack” so, as long as the Imperial teammates agree, you may blow up you own planet with the Death Star.

Quote:
7.The shield generator and sarlac pit cards say that their effects last until the player loses all troops in one battle. Can these cards stay in play for more than one person's turn if it takes that long for the player who played them to meet that condition?

You may only use these cards for one turn.
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Andrew Prizzi
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Thanks very much for the replies Dan. I've been thinking about the change in the relative power of the Hutts in a 3 or 5 person game I mentioned. In a 3 player game when it says Player 1 controls the yellow and orange Rebels and has 30 strating troops- is that 30 troops total or 30 for orange AND 30 for yellow? If it's the latter than the unit ratios are basically the same in a 3 or 5 player game.
 
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Justin Borges
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Thanks for the great review! I am dying for this game, absolutely. While the Clone Wars edition is cool, I think this one looks (gameplay-wise AND component-wise) much more like what I want.
Sweet.
Sweet.
Sweet.
 
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Roy Stephens
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Yes, the "Empire destroying its own planet with the Death Star" strategy is actually quite handy and within the realm of possibility for the game. The Emperor would certainly have no qualms with practicing a scorched earth policy in order to further his own goals (i.e. cutting off a hyperspace lane to a sector he is hiding in). devil

We never came across a situation where the card decks were depleted. The game plays too quickly (in a good way) for that to happen. The only problem I can see POSSIBLY arising from the inability to recycle cards is: IF the Emperor has cut off all possible entry points to a sector he is lurking in, AND IF the Rebel deck is depleted, there is no way for the Rebels to win as the only way to invade through an asteroid field is via certain cards... however, if a Rebel player knows this, then a VERY intelligent strategy is to hold those cards until needed. I tried that strategy as the Empire once, and my enemies made good use of those cards as they had drawn them early and held them, knowing that I tend to play in sneaky and obnoxious ways like walling myself off and then going for a leisurely kill. laugh

 
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Andrew Prizzi
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Anyone else have any thoughts on the shift in the balance of power between a 3 player and 5 player game?

In a 3 player game the Hutts start with close to equal forces as the Rebels or Empire.

In a 5 player game the Hutts are much more of a minor power which feels more appropriate.

Has anyone's experience been that the Hutts have an easy time with 3 players or a very difficult time with 5?

Am I reading the setup chart wrong? Does the "35 starting troops" for the empire in a 3 player game really mean 35 for Gray AND 35 for White? (likewise for rebels).

 
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Andrew Prizzi
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Holding important cards seems like a very risky strategy, since there are several cards that allow a player to discard someone else's cards from their hand. If you wait to use your "Fire the Death Star" or "Attack through an asteroid field" card, you're running the risk of your opponent plucking it out of your hand and never getting to play it at all.
 
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Roy Stephens
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That's WHY it's called "RISK"! laugh

What you say is true, but it also is a matter of strategy... is it more strategic to hold onto that card, or play it for ship/troops? You have to make that decision when the time comes. Knowing your opponents helps too, of course.
 
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Roger Herridge
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This game sounds ALOT better than the Clone Wars Edition. In theory I really like the Death Star element. IMO its alot better than the Order 66 element in the Clone Wars Edition.
 
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Garry Haggerty
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Quote:
Quote:
6.Can you use the Death Star to destroy one of your own or your teammate’s planets? The rules prohibit attacking your teammate. The question is does firing the Death Star count as an “attack” or is that referring only to normal invasions with troops? The Death Star rules in the booklet and on the cards, simply say to destroy the planet the Death Star is on with no mention of who owns the planet. While “Fire the Death Star” cards are rare, under the right conditions one might want to blow up their own sides’ planet to block off a section of the board. Is this legal?


Good question. The rules state that you may not “attack” your teammate, but in this game, destroying a planet with the Death Star is not considered an “attack” so, as long as the Imperial teammates agree, you may blow up you own planet with the Death Star.


Okay, but on page 14, Placing the Death Star, the second bullet says:

"Offensively, the Death Star can eventually be moved onto and destroy entire planets...controlled by your opponents."

(emphasis added)
 
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Andrew Prizzi
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Good point.

But it doesn't say you can't destroy planets which are not controlled by your oppoenents. Normally, I'd say that's a bit of a streach, but with the game's designer posting above that blowing up your own planets is ok, then I'd go with it.
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Bryan Banister
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I'm glad to have found this site... looks like a forum with people that will respond to my inquires!

I just picked up the game tonight and got to play a two player version with my sister. Our first game was really fun, but it seemed very unbalanced for the Rebel side. Granted the initial setup ended up favoring the empire and the empire strategy worked out well it seems, but still it was a very lopsided victory.

Here's a quick breakdown of some strategies I used in the setup phase when playing this two player version:

1) Build up the Hutts in a region that you opponent is trying to occupy:
This makes it harder for them and doesn't cost you a thing.

2) Use the Hutts to buffer your own region conquest:
Put them just outside the region your going after as a buffer. The Hutts never attack, so you don't have to worry about them.

From the setup it seems the empire already has a big advantage:

1) More territories = more reinforcements for the empire from the beginning:
It's just one troop at the beginning, but still the empire is already 5 territories ahead of the rebels. This also seems to make it easier for the empire to capture regions during the initial planet deployment.

2) Empire bases add greatly to defense and the rebels don't get this same advantage:
You would think that the rebels would be able to build bases too... especially since they seem weaker at the beginning.

3) Empire gets an extra card from the beginning because of the force balance:
I realize this may be an attempt to follow the movie, but giving them an extra card seems like a big advantage again.

Anyways, I haven't played the Rebels yet to see what my stategy will be, but I was curious about how others have played and won with this faction?? I hope you guys will share your thoughts about my lopsided impressions and you rebel victory stategies.

Thanks!
-Bryan
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Roy Stephens
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sdscbryan wrote:


From the setup it seems the empire already has a big advantage:

1) More territories = more reinforcements for the empire from the beginning:
It's just one troop at the beginning, but still the empire is already 5 territories ahead of the rebels. This also seems to make it easier for the empire to capture regions during the initial planet deployment.


Absolutely. They did really well in capturing the feel of the films and putting the Rebels in a very precarious position, as they should be since they are a rag-tag band of revolutionaries going up against the awesome might of a Galactic Empire that has maintained control for 20 years or so. The Rebels must work quickly to whittle the Empire down or they will be overrun early.

sdscbryan wrote:
2) Empire bases add greatly to defense and the rebels don't get this same advantage:
You would think that the rebels would be able to build bases too... especially since they seem weaker at the beginning.


Back to the movies again: The Rebel bases in the films had as their best defense the fact that they were hidden. Once the Empire located a Rebel base, the Rebels immediately began evacuating as they knew they couldn't hold against the Empire (see: Episode V, The Empire Strikes Back). Rebel bases are not great bastions of defense.

sdscbryan wrote:
3) Empire gets an extra card from the beginning because of the force balance:
I realize this may be an attempt to follow the movie, but giving them an extra card seems like a big advantage again.


Empire should have an advantage at the beginning as they are a juggernaut.

sdscbryan wrote:
Anyways, I haven't played the Rebels yet to see what my stategy will be, but I was curious about how others have played and won with this faction?? I hope you guys will share your thoughts about my lopsided impressions and you rebel victory stategies.

Thanks!
-Bryan


Rebels can win as long as they can locate the Emperor, and have several times in my group. A win via domination is MUCH harder to come by. The way we play it is that the least experienced Risk player gets Empire, the most experienced player gets Hutts, and the "good but not great" player gets Rebellion until everyone's skills are more on a level playing field.
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Jim B
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Quick rules question:

If I'm the Empire and say the Rebels control all of the Core worlds, what happens if I move the Death Star into a system there but don't destroy the planet:

Do the rebels get full resources for the core worlds (even through the death star is blockading a system there)?

 
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ruvion .
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that's a great way of using the death star...deny system bonus to your enemies. This is especially true when not using to the death star to blow us up a planet or defending a crucial junction.
 
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Daniel Lampus
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The Death Star can only be used for two things:

1 - A planet controlled by the Empire that contains the Death Star cannot be attacked.

2 - The Death Star can destroy the planet it is on with the use of the proper card.

So, the Rebels would get the region bonus.
 
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Robert Feyerharm
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I saw this game in Target today. Being a gamer who saw the Star Wars films when they were originally released in the theaters, I was very tempted to pick it up!

Reading through the rules description above, I have a question. The "hidden Emperor" rules sound fun and are in keeping with the goals of the Rebel Alliance in the original trilogy films. However, I haven't seen any reference in the rules to hidden Rebel bases. At the very least, the Rebel Alliance leadership (Mon Mothma, Admiral Ackbar, etc.) should be stationed at a hidden base which can be relocated from turn to turn. If the base is found and destroyed by the Imperial forces, the Rebel player would be severely crippled (perhaps lose one turn?) until he can reorganize. At any rate I think the cat and mouse hunt aspect of the original trilogy should be reproduced in the Risk version of the game.
 
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Mike Malley
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dansan wrote:
The rules clearly state that an invasion refers to the planet being invaded and not the planets from which you are invading.

This is a big change from the other Risk versions and should not be buried in Section I, which the rules state can be safely skipped if you've played standard Risk before.
 
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Chris G
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Hi, I hope somebody here can help me interpret something in this game. As we were playing yesterday. One of the rebel factions wanted to play the card "Clumsy as He is Stupid" which says:
Play after an opponent commits troops to a battle
All attacking troops are destroyed.

We had a long discussion about whether this means ALL of the attacking troops or just the three that are in battle in this roll of the dice.

We came to the conclusion that it depends on two things:
1) Is an attack the same as an invasion or is it the same as a battle?
2) Does the whole invasion force have to be declared before the battles begin?

Any thoughts?

Chris
 
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Garry Haggerty
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okotok wrote:
Hi, I hope somebody here can help me interpret something in this game. As we were playing yesterday. One of the rebel factions wanted to play the card "Clumsy as He is Stupid" which says:
Play after an opponent commits troops to a battle
All attacking troops are destroyed.

We had a long discussion about whether this means ALL of the attacking troops or just the three that are in battle in this roll of the dice.

We came to the conclusion that it depends on two things:
1) Is an attack the same as an invasion or is it the same as a battle?
2) Does the whole invasion force have to be declared before the battles begin?


1) An attack is the same as a battle.

"A battle is one roll of the dice...during an invasion" -- pg 8 (A Few Words About Combat)

2) Only the 1, 2 or 3 troops (and ships) participating in the current battle are declared:

"Your invasion force may be much larger than 3, but no more than 3 troops can be sent into each battle." -- pg 8 (How You Battle)
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