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Subject: A fun game about drunken murderers. rss

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Christopher Donovan
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Introduction

"In an honest service there is thin commons, low wages, and hard labor; in this, plenty and satiety, pleasure and ease, liberty and power; and who would not balance creditor on this side, when all the hazard that is run for it, at worst, is only a sour look or two at choking. No, a merry life and a short one, shall be my motto."
- Bartholomew "Black Bart" Roberts



Everyone loves pirates. Adorable, anachronistic, arrrrrgh, pirates. But who were they, really? Desperate criminals for the most part, men on the boundaries of civilization, loosed upon the high seas in (stolen) high-tech vessels of wood, iron & cloth. Their rebellious nature and outcast status has appeal, eh? But let us not kid ourselves. Their motives were scarcely noble. They gave little thought to the justice, or lack thereof, in their circumstances or in society at large. While they appear to have had a code, and some form of primitive politics and even a flicker of national aspiration, treachery was the norm. They made it their business to commit barbarous acts and profit from the terror instilled thereby. The more notorious their reputation for all manner of unspeakable cruelty, the better they could say their "career" was going. And so it is in Richard Berg's old-timey 1991 opus, Blackbeard.

A game for 1-4 players, Blackbeard might best be described as a historical adventure game with strong role-playing elements. Tactical in nature, it rewards the player who makes the most of opportunity, rather than planning carefully for the long-term. Strategy consists mostly in trying to be in the right place at the right time, and not being sunk by a storm.

It's quite good solitaire, better than most, so don't think the solitaire option is merely tacked-on - it's an important part of the game's appeal. I like it best with two, however. No less, no more.
(note: all images from Blackbeard image gallery...)

Components

Avalon Hill had pretty good standards at the time Blackbeard was published. A hand-painted Charlie Kibler board (mounted!) covers not just the Caribbean in detail, but the Gold Coast and the Indian Ocean as well. Your litany of despicable deeds may span the globe from Panama to Madagascar...



A deck of Pirate cards displays all of a Pirate's important stats - combat skill, dueling ability, leadership & cruelty ratings. The artwork depicting each Pirate is very good and full of character. Each card also has a short biography on the reverse and is quite colorful, as they are all accounts of real-life exploits. All the greatest Pirates are here - Captain Kidd, "Calico Jack" Rackham, Francois L'Ollonais, "Black Bart" Roberts, Stede Bonnet, "Blackbeard" Edward Teach, and several more besides. Abilities vary quite a bit, and here players are left at the mercy of fate - you might draw a top tier famous Pirate, or a little known bottom-feeder. More's the glory notoriety, I say, if you win with someone like Olivier Levasseur.



Another deck of action cards contain a wealth of information, including who goes next, what cargo a captured Merchant has according to where it was caught, the nature of a given personal injury, weather and what type of Random Event may or may not occur. They work very well to drive the game along at a decent clip.



Ships are kept track of by means of status cards, which are compact and well-laid out, with a nice drawing of each type - Sloop, Schooner, Brigantine, and so forth. The bigger ships pack a lot of punch, but can also be really slow, making you a sitting duck with heavy damage.



The counters, while nothing fancy, get the job done in a colorful and readable manner.



So, no major complaints in the component department, unless your copy is a first printing, in which case the board was misprinted, leaving out the dividing line between the Atlantic & Caribbean sea zones, but it's not hard to figure out where the line should go. One quibble, all numbers are tracked with number counters. Sometimes there don't seem to be enough.


Rules

"Let's jump on board, and cut them to pieces."
- Edward "Blackbeard" Teach



These are written in late-Avalon Hill style & layout. Not great, but I've seen worse, no problem if you were brought up on these things. Otherwise, it may take some getting used to but you will hopefully find that the cost in initial learning confusion is made up later in reference clarity. The game is not so much complicated as it is full of things to do. As a result, there are a lot of rules to cover it all, but none of them are very involved in terms of procedure. Mostly just roll some dice and add some stats.


The Game is in the Play!

"I am a free prince, and I have as much authority to make war on the whole world, as he who has a hundred sail of ships at sea and an army of 100,000 men in the field..."
- "Black Sam" Bellamy



Blackbeard is driven by a deck of cards, but it's not a "card-driven game". The active player draws a card from the deck, which will indicate either a specific player's turn to be taken or a random event take place (which reshuffles the deck...). This means it may well happen that one player gets to go several times in a row while another sits idle, it may also mean one player gets more total moves in a game than some other (though likely not by much). It sounds arbitrary, and it is, much like a Pirate's short, violent life. But with so many draws through the course of a game it tends to even out well enough, but the arbitrary nature of the mechanism can seem more pronounced the more players there are. With two, it provides a very nice variability to the game's pace. With three or four, it can get frustrating.

Cards are drawn, with the deck passing to the currently active player, until one player wins by attaining 100 notoriety, or all the players run out of Pirate lives, in which case the player who managed to peacefully retire a Pirate with the most notoriety, wins. Notoriety is gained and lost by a variety of things, as you would expect - generally burning, killing, and looting are "good", while cowardice and failure, are "bad".

Dead Pirates get you: nothing.

Each player has three lucky pirate-lives to burn through in pursuit of glory notoriety. He may have multiple Pirates in play, or just one at a time, but it does not affect the number of "moves" he gets. He may also have one or more "King's Commissioner" (or KC) on the board - essentially Pirate-hunters with a decent amount of firepower. These can come in handy for driving down a particularly glorious notorious opponent-controlled Pirate.

Each Pirate starts with a small but maneuverable ship and a rather bored and easily-disgruntled crew. Crew disgruntlement (called "unrest") is recorded per-Pirate, and if it gets disgruntled enough, your Pirate may be marooned (at best), or (more likely) tortured to death. Of course, if you have additional Pirate lives available, you have the option of starting a new Pirate with the deposed Captain's ship, and you can claim it was all intentional. Crew unrest goes down as Merchantmen are captured, Ports raided & burned, "Debauchery & Revelry" (D&R) is indulged, and/or loot is sold for cash. Crew unrest goes up with battle damage, declining to pursue potential prey (either because it is too strong or you don't want to offend a particular Crown), and (my personal favorite) Scurvy. Some of these events are outside of your control - Scurvy comes and goes by random event, and after taking a Merchantman there is a good chance you will be confronted with "Mandatory D&R": refuse to let your boys party, and things could get ugly. I've always played 2-player Blackbeard as a drinking game - take a D&R, take a drink.

When you have the good fortune to get a turn, you can move a Pirate, start a new Pirate, petition the crown for a KC, or move a KC. You can spend your time tracking & sinking Merchantmen or hunting down opposing Pirates - up to you. Potential targets enter the board face-down in Shipping Lanes around the world, and range from very weak to very strong. Squadrons of Warships patrol these same Shipping Lanes and can be quite deadly. Merchants, if captured, yield cargo of widely varying value. They may also yield a hostage, which may or may not yield some information useful for attacking a specific Port, and can be ransomed if they do not succumb to torture. Ports may be sacked - very lucrative in cash and notoriety - but it's often a dangerous move. On the rare occasion you find you have a Pirate present in the same location as another player's, an alliance can be formed for mutual co-operation. However, if a D&R takes place a duel must be fought against the most notorious Pirate present. This can lead to severed limbs, lost eyes, or death.

The lively game world randomly generates Merchantmen, coming and going, as well as enough prowling Warships to keep it interesting. Ports are randomly assigned Governors at the start of the game - some Pro-Pirate and amenable to bribes, some Anti-Pirate who can be quite prickly. Friendly Governors mean better prices for stolen cargo, and open the possibility of establishing a "Safe Haven" complete with a secret bank account. Conceivably a Pirate could one day settle-down at such a port and live a more or less respectable life off his laundered fortune. Partying in-port tends to try the Governor's patience, however. A couple of "Pirate Havens" are also located around the world - rock-bottom trade prices, but you can drink and fight all the live long day. If your Pirate attacks the Loyal Subjects of too many Crowns, he may find himself unwelcome anywhere else. Trust me, it's tempting.

The King's Commissioners tend to come into play mid-game as Pirates start to gain some real notoriety. They allow a player to maintain an active or response threat that can attack other player's Pirates directly. They fight just like Pirates, and take damage like Pirates, too (unlike Warships), so they will often have need of a friendly (Anti-Pirate) Port to make repairs. They can be quite relentless if a player is determined to run down a particular Pirate. I've also seen them languish for ages on trans-oceanic voyages (unlike Pirates, they require an Event card to come up - any Event - to make such voyages), neglected while slowly dying of the Scurvy.


But, is it any good?

"My Lord, it is a very hard sentence. For my part, I am the innocentest person of them all, only I have been sworn against by perjured persons."
- William Kidd



Blackbeard doesn't seem to have the best reputation as a game, but I think it deserves better, which is why I wrote this review. Blackbeard does what it sets out to do. It creates a more or less plausible recreation of the 18th century Colonial world in which Piracy flourished in its "Golden Age", and gives you a detailed but not overly complicated framework in which to play out storied lives of thievery & barbarism on the high seas. Personally I like this design philosophy of letting the player do what he wants, within the constraints of time & place. Decisions are not intentionally narrowed for dramatic effect. This generates a bit more rules overhead than is perhaps currently fashionable in a "light adventure" or "experience" game such as this, but then this has quite a bit more historicity baked into it than, say, Talisman (Revised 4th Edition) or Merchants & Marauders. Some may be disappointed that the game is so seemingly arbitrary and luck-driven, but then that was the reality of the day. If you think dealing with rules cases and hexagons is at odds with the style of play, or you are expecting a more strategic (as opposed to tactical) game, you might have to look elsewhere. But for a game about the real lives of actual Pirates, your choices are basically this game or nothing Lords of the Spanish Main.

For me, it's a great game just as it is - with the caveat that I would stick to 2 players, as, in my opinion, it bogs down too much with more players, relative to the weight of the game-play. Blackbeard should be played fast & loose, with a good sense of humor, and an attitude of "we're all gonna die, anyhow". I also recommend a good Rum, or whatever appeals to your tastes. There is a 2nd edition out there from GMT, which the designer thinks is a better game, but then he would think that, wouldn't he? While I have not played the new game, I am crankily skeptical of the switch from hexes to areas, and the addition of some "gotcha" in the card-play (something absent in 1st edition). I think the mechanism of the King's Commissioners as a means of direct player interaction (aside from the rare Duel) works rather well and is a unique innovation. You get to be the hard-driving Pirate hunter, as well as the Pirate...

The random coming & going of potential targets, as well as dangerous Storms & Warships, ensures your Pirate's lives will often have doldrums of barren luck, punctuated with a mixture of pathetic misfortune and violent success. What did you expect? "Pirates of the Caribbean"?

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Dean
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Very good review, thanks.
A lot of the old Avalon Hill games are very well thought out, but of course aren't as popular here on BGG because they are not new, shiny and loaded with plastic bits and "minis".
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Joseph Betz
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Nice review.
I enjoy this game solo more than multiplayer though as the random events make it a really good solo game. Hardcore gamers are turned off by the randomness but it really does reflect the life of a pirate.
The turn order with the cards also reflects the life of a pirate well as you can get a few turns in a row. That is how the life of a pirate was though with a time of alot of activity followed by a time of rest.
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Dan Poole
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Great AH game. Hated the remake
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Mike Clarke
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Nice review. I read it with interest having been warned away from Blackbeard many moons ago. Methinks I'm gonna have to try 'er out and see for meself. arrrh
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Christopher Donovan
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mikecl wrote:
Nice review. I read it with interest having been warned away from Blackbeard many moons ago. Methinks I'm gonna have to try 'er out and see for meself. arrrh


I didn't like it at first, because I kept trying to play it with 3-4 players, often casual players drawn to the picture on the box lid. I only came to appreciate it later as a laid-back 2-player game with my detail-loving girlfriend.
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Michael Lavoie
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Nice review. Good job!

I have to agree with Jbetz: this is a wonderful solo game. I've worn most of the blue off the Captain Blood counter playing this one over the years.
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Aaron
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VERY nice review of this classic. Also couldnt agree with you more on the Rum suggestion, especially when I D&R in a pirate haven. arrrh

There is nothing in the world can make it appear I was guilty of piracy.
-William Kidd

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Brett Schaller
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Still one of my favorite solo games.

I tried the remake, sold it, and happily and went back to this one.
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Dave Heberer
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Boy, that escalated quickly. I mean that really got out of hand fast.
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I only played the remake, with 3 or 4, and it was a god awful time. I think what it needed was for a non-active player to drive the encountering of boats to give them something to do and to let you soak in the atmosphere rather than trying to drive through the 15 rolls on different tables that let you know what you found on the boat you just captured.

But even then it was more of Arabian Nights, and less of a game. I didn't feel as if my decisions made any difference in the outcome of the game. Definitely more about the ambiance, and less about winning.
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Christopher Donovan
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i7dealer wrote:
I only played the remake, with 3 or 4, and it was a god awful time. I think what it needed was for a non-active player to drive the encountering of boats to give them something to do and to let you soak in the atmosphere rather than trying to drive through the 15 rolls on different tables that let you know what you found on the boat you just captured.

But even then it was more of Arabian Nights, and less of a game. I didn't feel as if my decisions made any difference in the outcome of the game. Definitely more about the ambiance, and less about winning.


The cargo results for captured Merchants is via die rolls on charts in the new edition? In the old version, that was all done with two or three (at most, if memory serves - 1 for cargo, 1 for hostage, 1 for port on a successful torture) card draws.

EDIT - the living rules indicate a single roll on one chart, and flipping a hostage counter. I was shocked (shocked!) to see, though, that merely finding a Merchant is enough to capture it, and that any Merchant can be converted. I'm so used to FIGHTING to capture the Merchants, and only getting to keep one if you roll doubles (if I remember right...). Are there any players of the old version on here who prefer the new? I'd be interested in hearing why they like the new one better. I like the graphics & artwork on the new version very much.
 
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Purple TripleCrown
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This is a war game that's actually fun (quite an accomplishment!).

I agree with the OP that the reprint was not as good a game as the original. The original could benefit from better quality counters, ship cards and event deck cards. That's all the reprint should have tried to accomplish. However, game designers, like musicians, can never seem to leave well enough alone (I'm looking at you, every rock band that ever put out a live album!).

There are a lot of excellent old AH titles that need nothing more than better quality components and a rule book reorganization/cleanup to compete with the best of modern board games.
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Roger Hobden
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Nice review !
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Michael Debije
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My favorite pirate game out there. Brilliant fun. The remake was a great disappointment, one of my only GMT duds.
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Christopher Donovan
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Purpletriplecrown wrote:
This is a war game that's actually fun (quite an accomplishment!).

I agree with the OP that the reprint was not as good a game as the original. The original could benefit from better quality counters, ship cards and event deck cards. That's all the reprint should have tried to accomplish. However, game designers, like musicians, can never seem to leave well enough alone (I'm looking at you, every rock band that ever put out a live album!).

There are a lot of excellent old AH titles that need nothing more than better quality components and a rule book reorganization/cleanup to compete with the best of modern board games.


I didn't say the reprint isn't as good (I can't as I haven't actually played it), I said I am crankily skeptical. You might say I'm prejudiced against the reprint.

I broke out Blackbeard (original) last night to play part of a solo game. I must say Blackbeard is a unique game. It does have a bit of overhead, and the rules were a little worse than I remember. The pace is very meandering and unpredictable. It took quite some time before the second dummy player even got a turn, thanks to the frequent Random Event reshuffles. I think in future I might perform random event via chit-pull as a house rule. That would pace things out more proportionately, at the risk of messing with the balance as-designed. I'll have to think up some other trigger for reshuffling the deck. Despite these quirks it's a fun game that flows nicely, you just can't expect certain things you might expect from other games. There is no constant conflict and tough decisions are not forced on you all the time. Negotiation is minimal, direct player interaction is subdued. But the "Pirate's life" comes through and it's amusing to watch if you have the right patience and mood...
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Dave Heberer
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Boy, that escalated quickly. I mean that really got out of hand fast.
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Doesn't each decision you make have to also have a roll on a chart to see what happens? Like you find a merchant vessel, roll to see what kind of cargo it is. Debauch your crew, roll against a chart. Torture the prisioner, pull a chit? Roll a table, I can't remember. I just remember it would have been better for sure to have like an encounter deck that the other player reads to you to see what decisions you make and it's printed there you don't have to roll a chart and consult. Nothing says theme like table lookup
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Christopher Donovan
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i7dealer wrote:
Doesn't each decision you make have to also have a roll on a chart to see what happens? Like you find a merchant vessel, roll to see what kind of cargo it is. Debauch your crew, roll against a chart. Torture the prisioner, pull a chit? Roll a table, I can't remember. I just remember it would have been better for sure to have like an encounter deck that the other player reads to you to see what decisions you make and it's printed there you don't have to roll a chart and consult. Nothing says theme like table lookup


I've only played the original version. You draw a card to see what cargo your Merchant has, then another to see if you get a hostage. Torture is a die roll against your Pirate's cruelty rating. If you get information from your hostage, you draw a card to see which port you receive information about. Debauchery & Revelry doesn't require a card draw.

I like it because it's systemic. Theme-mechanism integration ("realism"), for me, is more evocative of subject matter than aesthetics alone. But just how much is too much, is very much a matter of interest & taste.

In the old game Scurvy and Storms were random, in the new they are inflicted by other players via card-play. It looks like Merchant cargo was moved to a chart to make room for such events on the cards, which, while it doesn't seem like that big a deal, breaks up the flow of the game in my opinion. I prefer just flipping through a deck of cards rather than breaking to consult a die-roll against a chart. The old version doesn't have any die-roll charts at all, come to think of it.
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Dave Heberer
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Boy, that escalated quickly. I mean that really got out of hand fast.
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That sounds better, and I've considered trying the game again with the original version.
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aurelian
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Still one of the best games I own, much better than the remake. Besides the solo version in the rules, it plays very well solo by simulating 3 or 4 players using the full rules.

Although the luck factor is high (it's a brilliant story-telling game) there is more skill than first appears when you consider carefully the rules about retiring a pirate and conditions for ending the game when players have used up their maximum 3 allowed pirates. If you get an early lead with a pirate, say at 60 notoriety with all the others trailing, it's a fine judgement whether to retire him then play to get the opponents killed off rather than continue in the risky hope of reaching 100 points yourself. Multiple plays of this game are needed to fully appreciate the quality of its design and multiple paths to victory that can arise from gameplay.
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PAUL OCONNOR
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Had this back in the day, played it a bunch, sold it on. I'll get another copy someday. Or we can play your's the next time we're D&Ring.
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Juan Siso
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Great game and purely thematic.
Yes it has a lot of luck involved and yes it can be a lot of downtime and unfairness but you are a f'n pirate, FFS. Deal with it. arrrh

Best with two players who play agressive: with a too much defensive and slow player (who is going to lose anyway) the game gets boring.
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Russell King
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Thanks for this review, because it prompted me to try the GMT version solitaire - never got around to giving it a fair session - I'm very impressed indeed.

EDIT - actually just reading the above again it sounds like the GMT remake is a better solitaire game than multi-player...... for one, my group would not stand the set-up time alone
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Christopher Donovan
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goldenboat wrote:
Had this back in the day, played it a bunch, sold it on. I'll get another copy someday. Or we can play your's the next time we're D&Ring.


Just play my copy. Why would you want to go re-accumulating games in the range-band of Blackbeard? Great game, but it's such an odd niche.
 
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PAUL OCONNOR
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I'm at the point where I regard the entire secondary market as my extended game library.

I keep very little here, but I don't mind buying something back if I want to tinker around with it, even if just for a single play. It's more convenient than maintaining a large library full of games I may never play.

Arrr!

Zerosum wrote:
goldenboat wrote:
Had this back in the day, played it a bunch, sold it on. I'll get another copy someday. Or we can play your's the next time we're D&Ring.


Just play my copy. Why would you want to go re-accumulating games in the range-band of Blackbeard? Great game, but it's such an odd niche.
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Christopher Donovan
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goldenboat wrote:
I'm at the point where I regard the entire secondary market as my extended game library.

I keep very little here, but I don't mind buying something back if I want to tinker around with it, even if just for a single play. It's more convenient than maintaining a large library full of games I may never play.

Arrr!

Zerosum wrote:
goldenboat wrote:
Had this back in the day, played it a bunch, sold it on. I'll get another copy someday. Or we can play your's the next time we're D&Ring.


Just play my copy. Why would you want to go re-accumulating games in the range-band of Blackbeard? Great game, but it's such an odd niche.


A dabbling pirate, prowling the high seas of the secondary game market? You make it sound good!
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