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Subject: Sticky paint on coins, what is best to put on it? rss

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Ray
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Matthew 10: 29-31
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I have really wanted to get some good metal coins, and found a huge lot of the metal coins that they have a different events that are about the side of an American 50 cent piece, but not as heavy. And got a great price on them.

I bought some spray paint that gives a hammered gold metal effect to them and they look pretty good. But now they stick together in the box and I'm worried they will stick together during play, which will be more of a bother.

Would a matte finish spray help alleviate the stickiness? I tried to look up some posts and found one that mentioned this for mini's, but it wasn't clear to whether this would work or just something to try. Thanks!
 
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Paul DeStefano
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Miniatures are not meant to be handled. You should touch only their base.

If you really need to handle a painted mini, thats where gloss and matte fixatives come in.

They will HELP, but since coins get handled a lot and don't have bases, and will clink together, there's not going to be a satisfactory solution for painting coins.
 
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Ray
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Thanks Paul...that makes perfect sense. I think I'm desperate enough to be looking for the best solution possible

The supplies and coins were cheap so I thought I would go for it
 
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Paul DeStefano
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Gloss will hold up much better than matte.
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maf man
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it been a few years so this may or may not be helpful:
Anodize (ooooo aahhhhh science)

ok so you probably need to consult a jeweler or metal worker or someone you can get to for them to actually do this. Anodizing is a process that uses an electrically charged bath to chemically coat metal (usually aluminum). I don't know what kind of metal you have but if I remember right there are similar processes for other metals.

What I know is it can give your metal colored with no worry of stickiness
What it requires is some serious time learning or for you to contact a pro.

I plan to take on a job like this when I have the time, so I hope in about six months or so I can give you a fresh account. In the mean time good luck with your research/project!
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Jake Staines
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mafman6 wrote:

Anodizing is a process that uses an electrically charged bath to chemically coat metal (usually aluminum). I don't know what kind of metal you have but if I remember right there are similar processes for other metals.

What I know is it can give your metal colored with no worry of stickiness
What it requires is some serious time learning or for you to contact a pro.


Strictly speaking, "anodising" just adds metal oxide to the surface of a metal - it's generally done for protection (e.g. aluminium oxide is much less reactive than aluminium itself is). The reason anodised Al components are often brightly-coloured is that the anodising process for aluminium also makes the surface more receptive to dyes.


The relatively-safe-you-can-do-this-at-home-just-don't-eat-anything option that's similar is copper electroplating - get some copper sulphate crystals, a chunk of copper and a low-voltage power supply; connect the lump of copper to the anode, the electrically-conductive thing you want copper-plated to the cathode, dip them both in a copper sulphate solution and turn the power on. Electricity dissolves copper off the chunk into Cu++ ions (the same as in the dissolved copper sulphate) and Cu++ ions at the cathode reduce to regular copper at the same rate and deposit themselves onto the surface of the thing you're electroplating. Move the attachment point around while you're doing it and polish afterwards for bonus points!

Of course, this only helps you get copper-coloured coins. You can do other metals in the same way (metal chunk + metal salt + water + electricity) but copper is probably the one that it's easiest to find the stuff for.
 
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Ron Parker
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Bichatse wrote:
The relatively-safe-you-can-do-this-at-home-just-don't-eat-anything option that's similar is copper electroplating


And if you don't have access to copper sulfate, you can apparently make your own copper acetate and use that.
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maf man
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Bichatse wrote:

...more receptive to dyes.

... copper electroplating ...

Of course, this only helps you get copper-colored coins. You can do other metals in the same way (metal chunk + metal salt + water + electricity) but copper is probably the one that it's easiest to find the stuff for.


well the dies are usually a part of anodizing. It basically makes the color a part of the component.

copper electroplating is also a good method and I know they're ways to change the color of that too but for the life of me I cant remember. I've done both before so I know it is possible and with the right stuff somewhat simple. And a similar process that colors copper directly....hang on this one was easy, I remember doing it in 8th grade....
http://www.sciencecompany.com/Turn-Copper-Pennies-Into-Silve...
there you go, I don't think it applies to your specific problem but its fun non the less
 
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Chris Lanning
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parkrrrr wrote:
Bichatse wrote:
The relatively-safe-you-can-do-this-at-home-just-don't-eat-anything option that's similar is copper electroplating


And if you don't have access to copper sulfate, you can apparently make your own copper acetate and use that.


Ron, did you use this method for your Dominion coins?
 
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Broti
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Is the paint sticky when you touch it? Like it did not dry through completely? This is an effect of too thick layers of paint. Two ways to solve this problem: Bake the coins (if they are metal) at about 50°C for a really long time.
The alternative is stripping the coins and repainting.

If I got your question wrong, simply ignore me whistle
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Ray
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No...they were dry, but this paint has mixed in stuff to make it look like textured, which I think is the culprit. They look like older gold coins though.

I'd try to bake them, but if I made the oven smell like spray paint, but wife would be SOOOO ticked off at me!
 
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baker mouse
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If you want to bake but dont want to tick off the wife (I agree if my husband tried to bake stuff in my oven I would be ticked!) Get a cheep toaster oven from Goodwill/Garage sale and use that. Might take a little longer but you could do it outside so no awful smell in the house.
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