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Credit Mobilier» Forums » Variants

Subject: Majority (Plurality) Stockholder sets price of new stock. rss

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Richard Smith
Canada
Coquitlam
B.C.
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Hi all,
This is a simple variation that I think adds more strategy to the game.

Majority Stockholder rules for Credit Mobilier.
(c) 2015 by Richard Wayne Smith.

Rule 1: The player who has more shares than any other player in a company is termed the 'majority stockholder' for that company. If there is a tie for most, then no player is the majority stockholder.

Rule 2: The majority stockholder (thru various financial manipulations), may set the share price to either $1 / share or $2 / share. This is done as a free action on the majority stockholder's turn.

Rule 3: The price may be changed once per player turn BEFORE you buy stock. (So if you make it inexpensive for yourself, everyone else can buy it at that price on their turns.) Even if you do not buy stock, you can still change the price once on your turn.

That is it.

(A more accurate name would be plurality stockholder, but who has ever heard of that?)

Players may wish to make cardboard markers with $1 on one side and $2 on the other for each stock in the game. They start at $1 and once there is a majority stockholder, that person may flip it to either side on their turn.

This makes gaining a shares more important and makes it harder for people to muscle in on a big royalty pay out that you are setting up.

I think that these rules will give this fun game a bit of extra depth while not adding to the play time. The additional complexity is very modest.

I would be very interested in what players think of these rules.

Warm regards, Rick.
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Glenn Martin
Canada
Ottawa
Ont.
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Is there any greater value accorded higher priced stock at the end of the game? Otherwise, why wouldn't a player with the most stock in a company and thus the most to gain from a pay-out always raise the stock price to make it harder for other players to catch him?
 
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