Recommend
12 
 Thumb up
 Hide
9 Posts

Antike» Forums » Reviews

Subject: A Brilliant Civilization Game In Under 2 Hours... rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Marcus Lau
Malaysia
Petaling jaya
Selangor
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Violence begets violence.... But sometimes, violence IS the solution to everything...

Antike is a fast paced civilization game that can be played in under 2 hours. The whole game centers on the Rondel wheel. The Rondel Wheel is used to determine what a civilization (or player) is going to do every turn. The actions found on the Rondel are Maneuver, Iron production, Marble production, Gold production, Know-How (researching new technologies), Temple (building it), and Arming (making legions and galleys).


The Rondel Wheel

Each turn, a player first collects a coin (which can be used to substitute any resource), then moves his pawn clockwise on the Rondel. The first three moves around the Rondel (per turn) is free, but every subsequent move cost 1 resource per space. Here lies the simplicity and elegance in the game, each production segment (Iron, Gold, Marble) is four spaces away from their building counterpart (Arming, Temple and Know How). You will need Iron for Arming, Gold for Know How and Marble for Temples.
And there will also be two segments of the Rondel Wheel for maneuvering your armies to conquer other countries or sacking temples.

So how do you win? Surprisingly, it is a Victory Points driven game. The number of victory points needed to win differs with the number of players. For a 4 player game, 9 victory points are needed.

Victory Points are obtained by sacking temples (plunder them to the ground), controlling 5 countries (each player starts with only 3 countries and no army), discovering a NEW technology (there are 8 technologies to be discovered in the game), have a galley in 7 sea segments, and building 3 temples. Each of the actions are stackable and give the player 1 v.p. each time (controlling 5 countries will give the player 1 v.p. while controlling a total of 10 countries will give the player 2 v.p.'s).

The combat system is also worth mentioning as it is a very clean and dice free system. When another civilization attacks a civilization, the armies trade 1 to 1 (eg. when one legion/galley attacks another legion/galley, both are removed from play and considered killed). A unit of the same type can only go to war with another unit of the same type (legion vs legion, galley vs galley) unless the attacking player declares sacking the city or temple. If this happens, legions can trade blows with galleys and vice versa. Moving into the city of that country is considered one move. So, moving into an adjecent country to sack a city or temple is considered 2 moves. Legions and Galleys at the start of the game can only do 1 move until Roads, Sails, Wheels or Navigation (all these are technological advances) is discovered.


The Grey Player raised a large army to defend his temples...

In conclusion, Antike is one of the best civilization building game to come out of Essen in years. It is even better than Tempus by Martin Wallace and Civilizations II by Eagle Games. It is fast and brutal but yet has a very gentle learning curve. A beginner can learn to play in a matter of minutes but may not neccessary win. There are numerous strategies and opening moves to be made in this game. As such, there are a lot of possibilities and end game moves to be found and experiment with (ala Chess). Half the fun is discovering the optimal move and forming your own strategies in the course of playing this game. But beware, there is no such thing as a fool proof plan in a game of Antike as for every move, there is a counter-action. A cunning civilization (player) will calculate every possible moves before making a decision.

Vedi, Vidi, Vinci. (I came, I saw, I conquer)
Julius Caeser


Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him."
William Shakespeare



Final Score

Gameplay :
Components :
Replayability :
Learning Curve :
Overall :
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mark Bigney
United States
Kingston
Ontario
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
friedricetheman wrote:

Countrymen, Countrymen, Lend me your ears!
Ceaser, William Shakespeare


"Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him."

Notice that this a) is the correct spelling of Caesar, and b) precludes the quote being by Caesar, given that it's his funeral oration. It was said by Marc Antony.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Brad Miller
United States
Seattle
Washington
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Attacking is a cheap way to get cities.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Marcus Lau
Malaysia
Petaling jaya
Selangor
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Gyges wrote:
friedricetheman wrote:

Countrymen, Countrymen, Lend me your ears!
Ceaser, William Shakespeare


"Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him."

Notice that this a) is the correct spelling of Caesar, and b) precludes the quote being by Caesar, given that it's his funeral oration. It was said by Marc Antony.


Thanks for pointing it out. I didn't realize I've been quoting it all wrong until today.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Marcus Lau
Malaysia
Petaling jaya
Selangor
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
dcjackso wrote:
Did you find, as our group did, that there little or no incentive to attack (except for the obligatory temple-sacking at the end of the game)? In two games (one in which I observed, one in which I played), it appears that attacking is not usually very smart. Not only is it costly, but it also draws unwanted attention.


Based on my experience, especially in a 5-6 player game, a player is forced to attack another player because there is simply no where else to expand (imagine the same sized board but with 6 players).

Yes, it is true, attacking another player leaves your civilization open to attacks from other nations. But sometimes, you do not have any other means to get the last 3 V.P's....

But, anyways, that is just my playing group. We are an aggressive lot.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jonas Jacobsson
Sweden
Upplands Vasby
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
dcjackso wrote:
Did you find, as our group did, that there little or no incentive to attack (except for the obligatory temple-sacking at the end of the game)? In two games (one in which I observed, one in which I played), it appears that attacking is not usually very smart. Not only is it costly, but it also draws unwanted attention.


I have yet only tried a two player variant (posted in a thread here), and it's very combat intense. But since we are only playing with one half of the board, it's to be expected. As soon as one declare war and attack the other, the war will continue for almost every turn until the end.

Will try this game with my gaming group next Wednesday. It will be really interesting.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
brandon rogers
United States
milwaukee
Wisconsin
flag msg tools
mb
Quote:
Vedi, Vidi, Vinci. (I came, I saw, I conquer)
Julius Caeser


While we are correcting famous quotes...

The actually spelling is "VENI, Vidi, Vici" (I came, I saw, I conquerED)

pronounced vay-nee, vee-dee, vee-chee.

In any case, I really liked your review and I think I have been convinced to go pick up a copy for myself, thank you
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Don Lynch
United States
Boston
Massachusetts
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
The Romans pronounced it "way-nee wee-dee wee-kee".
I was the victim of a classical education.
2 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.