Mick Weitz
United States
Iowa City
Iowa
flag msg tools
No one in Iowa City plays wargames?
badge
Yes, I like helmets...
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The Battle of Akragas, fought in 406 BC in southern Sicily between the forces of Syracuse and Carthage, was refought today on the plains of southeast Iowa...

Set up was standard and straight out of the Tyrant scenario book. ---Note, in the images section of the game are 6 sequential photographs taken of this battle.

Both sides deployed their infantry in line, opposite each other. Skirmishers and Carthaginian chariots were spread between the two infantry lines. Each force covered its flank with cavalry arms. In this case, the light cavalry of each side would face the heavy cavalry (such as it was in 406 BC) of the other.

Turn 1 saw the Carthaginian left/Syracusan right infantry lines advance, leaving the right/left behind. The resilient skirmishers of both sides mixed it up in the center, inflicting only minimal disruption on each other. Several Carthaginian chariots went hurling towards the Syracusan's Greek allies on the right, but were relatively ineffectual (particularly since they would now be far out of command range for the rest of the game). The most important development occurred with each sides cavalry forces engaging each other. A momentum roll for the Syracusan cavalry commander, and a failed Carthaginian trump, allowed the Syracusan light cavalry to get superior attack position on the Carthaginian heavy cav. This would have serious reprecussions later...

Turn 2 saw continued (and ineffectual) skirmishing in the center. The Syracusans executed a line command to bring up their left flank, while the Carthaginian commander (Mago) was unable. The cavalry scrum on both sides continued, with the Syracusans keeping their edge from turn 1.

Turn 3 showed with certainty that the Syracusans would win both flanking cavalry engagements. This severly troubled the Carthaginian general (King Himilco), who gambled and shortened his exposed left flank by sending several African tribal levies around to attack the Syracusan Epilektoi Hoplites. The gamble appeared to pay off, as the supporting Peltasts were wiped out, and several cohesion hits placed on the elite Syracusan troops. However, the Syracusan cavalry commander Dionysius (later tyrant of Syracuse) rallied his heavy cavalry, and swung his horse hair plume toward the naked left flank of the Carthaginian line.

Turn 4 went bad quickly for Carthage, as their heavy cavalry commander Gisgo was killed battling Syracusan allied Greek light cavalry. To stall the triumphant light cav, Mago sent several units of Iberian light infantry towards the marauding Greeks. On the other flank, the returning Syracusan heavy cav smashed aside the attacking African tribal infantry, thus relieving the beleagered Syracusan Epilektoi (who were rallied by the cavalry commander). Carthaginian commander Himilco knew he had only one chance, if fortune favored him...

Turn 5, it did not. Thus began a series of momentum rolls for the Syracusans, and failed trump attempts by the Carthaginians. The Carthaginian light cavalry commander Atarbas had no more light cavalry to command, and thus attempted to trump Syracusan momentum, but to no avail. Though the Iberian light troops succeeded in running off the allied Greek light cav on the right, the Syracusan heavy cav crashed into the Carthaginian's left flank and began disrupting the line. As holes began appearing in Carthage's line, the Syracusan hoplites prepared to advance en masse...

Turn 6 saw an initial success for the Carthaginians, as Mago rode far out to the right of the line, and ordered a flank assault by his Iberian light infantry against the Greek hoplites facing him. One phalanx was annihilated, while another teetered on the brink. Given time, this assault could roll up the Syracusan left. However, there was no time. A series of momentus moves (pun intended) by the Syracusan hoplites (both Epilektoi and Militia), who charged the disrupted Carthaginian left, devastated the African levies. By the end of the action, only the Iberian medium infantry on the Carthaginian right were untouched. Those Iberians then proceeded to retreat in good order, as this battle was clearly lost. King Himilco himself was completely surrounded and leading a severly degraded unit when the rout began. His fate is fairly certain.....

End of Turn 6 saw Syracuse win after inflicting 120 rout points on the Carthaginian forces (over 40 in the last turn). The Carthaginians only inflicted 40 rout points on the Syracusans. Overall, an excellent game.
Losing the flanking cavalry engagements was doom for the Carthaginians. With any flanking support, they could have rolled at least one of the Syracusan lines (while getting their's rolled simultaneously). More aggression with the top notch Iberian and Libyan troops may have aided Carthage as well, though the Syracusans were careful never to disrupt their line. Not having Alexander around to kick everyones butt is really kind of refreshing...

Mick
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mick Weitz
United States
Iowa City
Iowa
flag msg tools
No one in Iowa City plays wargames?
badge
Yes, I like helmets...
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Whoops....there are only 4 pictures on the Tyrant page...two were a bit blurry for the Geek. Mick
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
tiger tiger
United States
Lexington
South Carolina
flag msg tools
mb
Thanks for the SR, I've been looking at getting this module.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.