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Subject: The momentum shifts, and shifts again rss

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Turn 1 (second half of 1942)

The Soviet armies called up infantry reserves and rushed them to the West, to face the German juggernaut. In the Soviet Far East, infantry regiments moved South toward occupied Manchuria in hopes of gouging out the Japanese flank.

Germany plowed money into research to no avail, building up its bomber fleet and adding an armored regiment. The Eastern Front was curiously becalmed, as German forces stopped and then pulled back, primarily pressing the attack elsewhere, in North Africa and off the Iberian Peninsula, with only an opportunist Panzer foray into the territory of Archangel. Off the Spanish coast, German naval and air power decimated an isolated British fleet, denuding the area of British sea power. In North Africa, a landing assault combined with a thrust from Libya was almost repelled by a stalwart British defense that left few Axis tanks to hold the region. Britain itself saw action as well, as German bombers rained destruction down on factories in the hearts of England and Scotland. Finally, a dangerous game of cat-and-mouse culminated in the destruction of the merchant marine force lingering off the Canadian coast.

Startled at this shift in German momentum, England bolstered its defenses, equipping infantry and a smattering of armor. Taking what opportunity it could, the RAF went sub hunting off the coast of Canada and off to bomb Berlin, the latter foray ending in the tragic destruction of the RAF's bomber groups over the German homeland. In Africa, British troops moved from South Africa to Rhodesia, hoping to come to grips with Rommel's armor with the aid of British infantry collecting in Trans-Jordan.

Japan, preparing for expansion, built up its armored and air forces, then picked and won three huge battles. In the Indian ocean, Japanese battleships and carriers wiped out the British fleet, losing some fighters but otherwise sweeping the oceans clear -- and allowing a combined landing and overland assault to flood India, pushing aside the British defenders. In the Pacific, two Japanese fleets converged on Hawaii, where they wiped out the defending American fleet. Finally, Japanese forces in Manchuria responded to the Soviet buildup by driving right into it, backed by air cover and a landing at Vladivostok. With minimal losses the Imperial army broke the Soviet defense, opening the door to the Soviet Far East.

Stunned by a second major loss in the Pacific, America rebuilt two carrier fleets while moving everything to the West Coast. Transports left Atlantic ports and met escorting American battleships around Panama, preparing to make their way back up to the ports of San Diego and Los Angeles.

As Christmas of 1942 approached, Japan controlled an ever-expanding crescent of Eastern Asia, Germany spread its influence in Africa and the Allies rebuilt, preparing to blunt the Axis push.

Turn 2 (first half of 1943)

Planning to capitalize on the apparent German withdrawal, Soviet armor and infantry massed near the front. A separate contingent of armor and infantry drove East, preparing to blunt the Japanese advance. Finally, Soviet forces retook the poorly-garrisoned Archangel.

All of Germany's effort in early 1943 turned toward the looming invasion of England. As German shipyards churned out transports, the Luftwaffe swarmed the Channel and the island itself, cleaning out the remains of the British fleet and devastating British industry, with few losses. German panzers continued to roll through Africa, claiming more formerly Allied territory. Elements of the German fleet continued to cruise relentlessly North from the Mediterranean, preparng to support the impending cross-Channel landing. Ignoring the coming Soviet threat, the German army massed in the west, waiting for their D-Day.

With its factories in flames, Britain called up its reserves and built what armor it could, as well as shuttling the remaining armor over from Canada. Isolated troops in Africa moved North to the Congo, hoping to come to grips with German tanks before the loss of more territory. Meanwhile, several regiments collected in Persia, blocking a Japanese advance into Central Asia. Remnants of the British fleet moved to the Northwest coast of Australia, positioning for a strike into the Japanese-occupied Pacific.

Japanese engineers retooled factories in India for arms building as the home island concentrated on armor and sea transport. Heedless of the armored columns heading their way, the Japanese army spread out, grabbing more territory in the Soviet far east. In the Pacific, the Japanese fleet struck the California coast, backed by planes from the home islands. Hours of fierce fighting saw the U.S. fleet decimated yet again, with the Imperial navy left in control of the California coastline. The other Japanese fleet left the Indian Ocean to destroy the remaining British fleet off the Australian coast. Although they achieved their goal, calamity struck, and the Japanese fleet lost its battleships in what should have been a very one-sided fight.

Despite these losses, the U.S. continued to produce ships, tanks and rifles, preparing for a massive oversea assault on the Japanese mainland. With few options, the combined Atlantic-Pacific battlegroup cruised straight into the Japanese. The second battle of California saw the Japanese and U.S. fleets trading shots just off Catalina island, with airplanes dogfighting over Los Angeles. At the end of the day, the Japanese fleet was a wreck, but so was the American fleet, leaving just the group of Atlantic transports to steam majestically into port as smoke filled the horizon.

Turn 3 (second half of 1943)

Seeing a chance to reclaim lost ground, Soviet forces pushed into the Ukraine, Belorussia and West Russia in the West, and into the Yakut SSR in the East. It was a massive deployment, leaving Moscow and the Caucasus devoid of any defenses -- not that it seemed to matter, given the situation on the ground. The Soviet army was victorious on all fronts, although the battle of West Russia took a terrible toll on the infantry. In the Caucusus, factories rolled out more and more armor, as the meagre Soviet sub fleet slid into the English Channel, in hopes of hindering the impending German invasion fleet.

After months of buildup, the German invasion fleet cruised into the Channel as the Luftwaffe blackened the sky over Britain. Flushed out by German destroyers, the Soviet submarine squadron was killed by German U-boats before it could make its move, clearing the last bit of resistance to the crossing itself. Allied antiaircraft batteries took a toll, but only amongst German fighters, and not the critical bombers. German troops unloaded on the the Eastern and Southern beaches and ports of Britain under the supporting fire of their own battleships as the outnumbered British pilots fought desperately for air superiority overhead. In a grinding battle, the massive manpower rallied by the United Kingdom proved decisive, exacting a hideous toll from the German forces and finally driving them into the ocean. Except for the Luftwaffe bomber groups, none escaped. In light of this defeat, the taking of the Belgian Congo was little consolation. As the Soviet army pushed into Germany's territory from the East, German factories produced a massive volume of new panzers -- just in time to replace those lost in the failed invasion.

With little to do but rebuild and defend, Britain armed every young man it could find and waited. Would there be another attempt? In Africa, the British commander on the scene thought better of engaging the unified German forces and instead chose to withdraw to South Africa.

Facing three different Allied forces in Asia, Japan chose to engage the weaker two, striking out against the British in Persia, and the Americans in French Indochina and China. The efforts were successful on all fronts, leaving Japan poised, however weekly prepared, to strike into the heart of the Soviet Union. In the Soviet Far East, Japanese infantry withdrew south, blocking the obvious strike into Manchuria. The remaining Japanese carrier fleet made its way north to the Caroline Islands, moving to intercept the impending American invasion fleet. On the Asian mainland, factories in India built new, heavier tanks for overland conquest as a new production facility was built in Kwangtung to support the land war.

The Americans had their own problems. If they launched their invasion fleet now, interception by the Imperial Navy was a certainty. Without escort, the fleet was doomed. Instead, invasion plans were pushed back long enough to field a new escort fleet, consisting of a carrier group and associated destroyers. Would the delay lose the war? Only time would tell.

Turn 4 (first half of 1944)


For the Soviet army, there was no choice but to press onward. German defenses were weak, and Soviet forces attacked in Eastern Europe and the Balkans, handily sweeping aside the few Wermacht forces in the area. A largely infantry-based assault on Norway succeeded as well, pushed through with the aid of Soviet air dominance. Soviet armor swept on a liberating run through the Soviet Far East before converging with the main Soviet army to crush the limited Japanese infantry force left to hold Buryatia. On all fronts, the Soviets were ascendant.

If a second try at Britain were ever realistic, it had ceased to be when Soviet armor broke through Germany's eastern defensive line. Now Berlin itself was at risk. In a surprise move, Germany made two amphibious assaults, on Norway and into the undefended territory of Archangel, allowing a panzerblitz to retake Western Russia and put Soviet supply lines at risk. Perhaps driven by their prior defeat, Luftwaffe bombers reappeared in the skies over Britain, taking losses even as they dealt a near-crippling blow to British industry. In the South, the insult to the Crown was compounded as German forces rolled into Rhodesia, eliminating the last British military presence in Africa, just as German sub attacks eliminated the last of British shipping in the Atlantic. Back in the heart of Europe, the Wehrmacht called up regiment after regiment of infantry, set to defend against a Soviet onslaught.

Britain, fully on the defensive, rearmed its home guard and waited.

Japan had time -- a lot of time -- before the delayed American assault. With that in mind, Japanese resources went into armor to replace losses expected in an assault in earnest on the Soviet Union -- and many resources were held back, waiting to build a naval defense when the time came. Armored columns rolled into the Kazakh Republic, crushing all opposition and meeting up with another armored force making it was through Sinkiang. Japanese bombers took a bite out of Soviet production in the Caucasus after a long overflight of China, and a final landing in occupied India. Elsewhere, transports ferried infantry up the Asian coast to bolster Manchuria's defenses against the approaching Soviet army, and the Imperial navy moved into a blocking position off the Japanese coast, waiting for the Americans to make their move.

Deeming the risks of a naval engagement just too great, the Americans pulled a sudden switch, striking out Southwest and taking Wake Island. Plans for a naval battle were not apparently off the docket, however, as a complete new carrier fleet was readied in the shipyards of San Diego, and armor continued to be built.

Turn 5 (second half of 1944)


The time was at hand. Driving in from the North and the South, Soviet forces attacked Germany itself. The early assault saw the loss of the remaining Luftwaffe bomber forces, fored into the uncomfortable role of close air support. Infantry losses were profound on both sides. As the battle progressed deeper into the cities, Soviet losses piled up, until Soviet forces found themselves outnumbered. Facing obvious defeat if he pressed on, Zhukov called off the attack, pulling his remaining armor back into Eastern Europe. Just as the German assault on Britain had floundered, so had the Soviet strike at Berlin. Soviet forces faired marginally better elsewhere, taking heavy casualties as they destroyed the German armored incursion into West Russia. Having lost the momentum, the Red Army once again put its manpower to work, defending the strategic Caucusus and the approach to Berlin.

Germany made little noise in response to the Soviet failure, moving out small forces to occupy the Balkans, Karelia and Belorussia. In Africa, the Wehrmacht consolidated its hold on the continent. The reigning ambition became clear, however, as more transport hulls were laid off the German coast, and infantry units reformed. A second assault on Britain was coming.

Britain, isolated, continued to build its defenses. It would not be taken cheaply.

Now was the time for Japan to make a radical move -- and it made two. Japanese armored forces, backed by air power, rolled into the Caucusus en masse. In the Pacific, the Japanese navy hit the American fleet head on around Wake, bringing along transports in what seemed like a desperation move. With Soviet forces unprepared for an attack from the East, the Caucusus fell in short order. Now the remnant Soviet Western army found itself nearly completely cut off from Moscow. In the Pacific, conflict raged in the waters around Wake. Driven by necessity, Japanese forces attacked again and again. Although Imperial Navy losses were complete, the objective was achieved. American air power was decimated and -- most important -- the transport fleet was damaged. A portion of the American landing force was now stranded on Wake. This fight was far from over, too -- Japanese builders were churning out submarines, ready to eliminate the American naval presence once and for all.

America's plans continued apace. Aircraft from the Pacific fleet went sub hunting off the Japanese coast with some success as a reduced landing fleet sailed into Manila harbor, retaking the Philippines unopposed.

Turn 6 (first half of 1945)

Tossed about on the tides of fortune, the Soviet army was fully on the defensive. Building up armor and troops around Moscow, Stalin ordered the remains of his Western army to return home. That they did, liberating Karelia and Archangel, but leaving the city of Leningrad nearly undefended. Giving up on any ambition of attacking Manchuria, the Soviet Eastern army began to retreat to the capital as well.

Germany, on the offensive again, invested in rebuilding the Luftwaffe's bomber core and the Wehrmacht's armor. Panzer divisions rolled out from the heart of Germany once more, crashing into the weakly manned defenses around Leningrad, sweeping them effortlessly aside. German and Japanese forces met up for the first time as German infantry retook Ukraine, placing them adjacent to Japanese armored companies in the Caucusus. The fleet collected in the Baltic, waiting for their next attempt on Britain.

For Britain, its military confined largely at home, rebuilding would be slow. Hulls were laid for transports at Scapa Flow, hoping that German raids wouldn't destroy them in port before they could liberate the continent.

Unsure whether its submarine gambit would succeed, Japan built yet another carrier fleet to try and regain dominance in the Pacific. With no guarantees, the entire sub fleet was ordered South to engage the remaining American fleet around the Philippines, backed by bomber support from India and the remaining Japanese transport capacity, tasked from Indochina. American fighters scrambled, hoping to defend the vulnerable transport fleet that was American's only hope in the Pacific. The first wave of submarine attacks was devastating, destroying many transports and the American carriers. The Americans responded with a vengeance, hunting down and killing nearly all the submarines. The destruction on both sides was nearly complete, but at the end of the day, one squad of transports still survived. Would that be enough to threaten Japanese domination? In Europe, Japanese tanks attacked West Russia, routing its meagre defensive force. The incomplete victory in the Pacific left Japan in a quandary, blunting its momentum in Europe as it shored up its Pacific defenses ahead of an expected attack.

American industry continued to produce transports in the Pacific, hoping to recover the men stranded at Wake and the Philippines. In the meantime, a small force left from Manila for an uncontested landing in the East Indies. For the first time, American bombers overflew Japan, taking a bite out of Japanese industry. Bombers collected in the Philippines, preparing for more strikes against Japan as a new attack force began to form in the ports of Seattle, Oakland, Los Angeles and San Diego.

Turn 7 (second half of 1945)

Seeing a chance to cause problems for the Japanese even as its front collapsed back to Moscow, the Soviet army sent one armored brigade through Sinkiang and China, liberating the locals (though perhaps not for long). Otherwise, it was all a matter of reinforcing the now daunting fortress Moscow against the incoming invasion force.

The Wehrmacht saw Moscow as an impractical target, at least for now, and continued to build armor as its forces rolled through Archangel. In response to the threat of transports at Scapa, the Luftwaffe sent out several long-distance bomber raids. In a flash, any British ambitions of leaving their island were dashed.

That would not keep them from trying again, however. Even as Scottish shipyards worked as fast as they could, the fighters of the RAF flew into Norway in pursuit of the Luftwaffe. Without fighter escort, the Luftwaffe bombers were hardly able to defend themselves, many being destroyed on the airfield. The RAF had its vengeance.

Japan tried to retake its lost initiative, its armor moving into China to face an outnumbered Soviet force, as at the same time its forces pushed north into Buryatia, supported by naval air power. In Southeast Asia, Japanese air wings sallied forth into the East Indies, where they took surpisingly heavy losses, but achieved the critical goal -- destruction of the American transport fleet. Pending any rescue, the Americans in the Pacific were now trapped, be it in the Indies, the Philipinnes or on Wake. Both actions on the mainland were a success -- now, nothing at all stood between Japan and Moscow. Still, construction focused on naval units -- at the moment, reconstuting the submarine fleet was a prime concern.

Seeing the Japanese buildup, the American navy decided to hold off on its rescue mission, at least long enough to pull together a second carrier group to defend the critical transports. In the meantime, American bombers raided factories in Kwangtung and on the home islands, the latter attempt ending poorly for the Americans.

Turn 8 (first half of 1946)


Nearly penned in, the Soviet army nonetheless truck out, sending infantry pickets to the east to slow the Japanese advance, and sending one armored division south into Central Asia to threaten India. Otherwise, Soviet forces stayed around Moscow, waiting for the Axis hammerstrike.

German forces built up to the west of Moscow as central Germany produced more tanks. The German fleet moved as a massive unit toward the French coast, preparing to strike against the growing British transport fleet.

Britain, desperate to regain some military position, sent a strikeforce south to land in Algeria, then continued to build transports at home.

The Japanese army drove south into Persia, chasing the Soviet armored columns through the dry Central Asian plain (and finally destroying them there). Japanes armor rolled the other way through Sinkiang, conquering the area and then assaulting Soviet infantry in Novosibirsk. It was no contest. Armies similarly marched through the Soviet Far East and the Yakut republic. The Soviets were hemmed in on all sides by Axis forces. In the Pacific, the Imperial navy boldly moved to Wake, daring the Allies to attempt to reconnect with their stranded land forces. At the same time, more submarine hulls were prepared, in the event of another round of sea warfare.

The Americans took that door, steaming straight toward Wake with their entire fleet. Japanese fighters, outnumbered two to one, took the the skies as the Japanese sub fleet dashed in to try and sink the crucial transports and carriers. At the end of the epic engagement, however, the transports and carriers were unscathed, and the Japanese fleet was gone. The Americans had reconnected with Wake, and their future in the Pacific looked good. Back at home, more transports were built, with more tanks and men ready to fill them.

Turn 9 (second half of 1946)

Wary of any reduction to Moscow's defenses, Zhukov nonetheless saw the value of sending an infantry group off to, at least briefly, recapture the undefended Caucusus. Otherwise, fortress Moscow remained static, still waiting for the impending assault.

The German navy split up, half heading for the recently built transports in the North Sea, the other half taking an infantry assault group South to attack Algeria and the fleet moored offshore. Both efforts were successful, and once again, British ambitions toward strategic shift were shot down. At the same time, the main event had begun -- Panzers were rolling into Moscow. The battle raged for over a month, but even for the German command, the outcome was not unexpected -- Moscow stood. Still, the attrition of Soviet forces had been deemed worthwhile, and the next wave of tanks was already on its way.

Seeing the folly of attempting to get off their island right now, the British government instead put money into new bombers, and research on rocketry -- not yet successful.

Urged on by their German allies, Japanese armored forces made an attempt on Moscow. They met the same fate as the first German attack wave, albiet with much less impact on Soviet defenses. In the Pacific, the Japanese sub fleet made its move against the Americans.They did some damage, but not nearly enough. With their fleet destroyed, the Japanese went fully defensive, building up armor on the home islands.

American forces made their move, heading northwest from Wake with a wave of assault ships, under cover of air power from their carriers and from the Philippines. Infantry losses were nearly total, but in the end, the objective was taken -- the Japanese homeland had fallen to a US invasion. With very few forces scattered across Asia, and no naval power to speak of, Japan's prospects for recovery were dim, indeed. Having banked on this victory, the US was already in production for taking the war to Europe, with a fleet forming in Atlantic harbors, and tanks and infantry massing in the east.

Turn 10 (first half of 1947)

With the fall of Japan, prospects suddenly didn't seem quite so dim for the Soviets. All they had to do was hold on. In aid of this, they reinforced Moscow and waited, sending small infantry forces out to retake Novosibirsk and to liberate Persia, en route to the now-undefended India.

Seeing the shift in American momentum, the German fleet collected off the European coast, preparing to defend against an assault. Armor continued to roll toward Moscow, but there would be no reinforcements for a while, as preparations began to defend the homeland.

As the population of Britain cheered the American victory in Asia, RAF bombers exacted a blistering toll on German industry. Confident that no more naval intervention would be coming, Britain resumed ship building. The end was in sight.

Hoping to defend what they had and help as they could, Japanese commanders on the mainland ordered the taking of Evenki and a retreat from French Indochina to India.

American forces moved on from Japan and the Philippines to make an uncontested landing in Indochina, with the armored brigades continuing on into India proper. The remnant Japanese defenders did what damage they could, but had no hope of staving off the superior American forces. Troop ships cruised northwest from California, stopping over in Alaska on their way to liberate the Soviet Far East. On the Eastern seaboard, an army of epic proportions was coming together, along with the fleet to carry it and the air power to back it up.

Turn 11 (second half of 1947)

The end was in sight. Soviet forces built up Moscow's defenses, sparing just one armored brigade to go retake Karelia and Leningrad. Now all the Soviets had to do was weather one more wave of German armor.

The German generals facing Moscow knew their odds were long, indeed -- but they pressed ahead, hoping to decapitate the Soviet army and remove the pressure on their Eastern flank. At this point, it was victory or nothing. German armor moving into the outskirts of Moscow was subject to a seemingly endless series of ambushes by the Soviet infantry corps, followed by a counterattack of epic proportions by Soviet armor. It was a slaughter. By the time the Wehrmacht called off the attack, the bare remnants of a German armored force remained, demoralized and retreating to Western Russia. As Generals back in Berlin noted that the battle turned out much as they expected rather than as had been hoped, infantry rushed to reinforce the European coastline. Surely, an Allied offensive would come soon. The sole bright point for Germany came as it took the Caucusus. That was unlikely, however, to last long.

The United Kingdom began production of armor and equipment as it made its first foray onto the mainland, landing armor and infantry regiments in Norway. RAF bombing raids over Germany had little effect. Regardless, the mood int he UK was high. The Americans were coming.

Isolated and with little hope of resupply, Japanese infantry stuck on the Asian mainland retreated to the Yakut Republic. The fate of their nation was now out of their hands, but they would hold on as long as they could.

With the Japanese command structure smashed, America exploded into Asia. In a wave of attacks, American forces took control over Borneo, Kwangtung, China, Manchuria, Buryatia and the Soviet Far East. Moving up from India, American armored regiments rolled right through the sparse German forces holding the Caucusus -- the occupation had been short-lived, indeed. Even as American forces liberated Asia, another battle group set off from the East Coast, ferrying a massive assault force of infantry and armor to the UK, under cover of a carrier battle group. The ingredients were now in place for a massive assault on Fortress Europa. Back at home, American industry built a substantial bomber fleet, ready to back the impending attack.

Turn 12 (first half of 1948)

The battered remnants of the German Eastern front army were all that stood between the Soviets and a strike at Berlin itself. As Soviet industry limped into action, producing what armor it could, the main Soviet force passed through the Caucusus, avoiding German armor in Western Russia and striking out for the Ukraine. A separate force consisting of some armor backed by infantry moved into Western Russia, wiping out the retreating German armor. Elsewhere, Soviet infantry liberate Kazakhstan, Sinkiang and Evenki.

The Americans were right there in England, and Germany simply needed more time. The German navy, largely geared toward a landing action, thrust itself toward the heart of the American fleet. American airplanes took to the skies, searching desperately for the key German destroyers and battleships hidden among a deceptive mass of transports. Amid high seas and the confusion of battle, however, this was a hopeless task. After nearly a day of brutal conflict, the entire American fleet was lost, whereas the German battlegroups, destroyers and dreadnoughts both, were intact. The German gambit had succeeded. American airpower retreated to Britain. For now, at least, the Americans had no hope of landing on the continent. Thus assured of more time, the Wehrmacht rushed infantry to the Eastern front, ready to break the tide of incoming Soviet armor.

Allied setbacks aside, Britain took the opportunity of a distracted German fleet to make a pincer strike into Eastern Europe, landing troops under cover of bombers and fighters as its armor swept South through Karelia. This coordinated assault was wildly unsuccessful, and had to be called off almost as soon as it had begun. Duly chastened, Britain continued producing tanks and bombers, waiting for a chance to make a more decisive move in Europe.

The lone Japanese army left in Asia was now completely hemmed in. Its commander waited, hearing no commands to do otherwise.

Beaten back but hardly down, America rebuilt its transport fleet in the Atlantic, rebuilding its submarine corps at the same time. Hoping to prevent another Atlantic defeat, the Army Air Corps launched an epic assault against the remaining German fleet. Planes were lost, but the German defeat was profound -- Germany now had no defense in the Atlantic. At the same time, American armor landed in Africa, retaking vast stretches of largely undefended territory. American forces moved on the Japanese army that had lingered for so long in Asia, crushing it. Simultaneously, a Marine landing on Okinawa displaced the Japanese forces there, though not without losses. The once grand Japanese empire was now reduced to a handful of island holdings in the Pacific. American bombers took heavy casualties trying, ineffectively, to strike at German industry in Southern Europe. Everywhere that it was not engaged, the US military moved. Transports in the Pacific struck out for the Suez and Panama canals, hoping to reach Britain in time to make sure the promised landing attack took place.

Turn 13 (second half of 1948)

Now in motion, the Soviet juggernaut would not be stopped. Soviet armor poured into Eastern Europe. Soviet armored forces crushed the German defenders. The Soviet army was now truly on Berlin's doorstep. Having anticipated this position, factories in the Caucusus spent this entire season producing new combat aircraft, for the final assault.

Germany was in full retreat. But for a nominal "roadblock" contingent, infantry in the Balkans retreated to Southern Europe. Defenses were laid, in hopes that enough time could be bought to regenerate the Wehrmacht and return once more to the offensive. In Africa, German forces moved out, slowly, hoping to contain the damage done by roving American armor.

RAF bombers struck a devastating blow against German industry, leaving factories in smoking ruin in Southern Europe and Germany proper. Under the suspicious gaze of the Soviet army, British forces moved by land and sea into Eastern Europe. Not content with being a secondary player in the resolution of the war, Britain built a whole new transport fleet. When the time came, the British army would be able to take part.

American forces continued in their liberation of the Pacific, taking the Carolines and New Guinea. The last coherent Japanese army in the world now stood guard in the Solomons. In Europe, the Army moved against the trailing German force in the Balkans, defeating it handily. American airpower did not have the wild success of the British, taking more casualties and doing less damage. The American African expeditionary force completed the liberation of the bulk of Africa. It would soon have to deal with the German North African army, however. The rebuilt transport fleet made its way to the UK as a second large contingent approached the Iberian peninsula. Unlike the Pacific contingent, this force would make it in time to participate in the landing. American industry worked overtime, producing a fleet of bombers unlike anything seen to that point in the war.

Turn 14 (first half of 1949)

As 1949 opened, Soviet commanders made a strategic decision. Berlin, at least for the moment, was too well defended. They moved South, avoiding fortress Germany entirely and, instead, attacking occupied Southern Europe. Under cover of newly minted Soviet aircraft, Soviet armor advanced toward a complex network of German defenses. Soviet losses were profound, but they drove on relentlessly. After over a month of bitter fighting, Soviet tanks rolled through liberated Rome.

The loss of their Southern holdings prompted a sudden and violent change in command. German forces surrended soon after. The war was over.



The end of this game saw America in control of all of Asia, with American forces about to pass through Moscow on their way to Germany -- one imagines comrade Stalin would not have been pleased. Soviet forces hold Southern Europe, but the Americans hold their line of return to the USSR. Britain has liberated Norway and has its own troops in an otherwise undefended Karelia. Both Western and Central Europe were still quite well defended, and its an open question whether the impending Allied attacks would have been able to crack one of these locations right away. The Soviet strike at Southern Europe was bold and costly, but it worked out. Even had this been a "to twelve cities" game, it would have been a good move, as it removed a lot of industrial capacity from Germany -- after Germany had already suffered substantial losses to an astoundingly successful bit of strategic bombing from Britain, and from the loss of African and Eastern European holdings. Germany could not have afforded to retake the South, either.
 
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Gotthard Heinrici (prev. Graf Strachwitz)
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This game should not stop here!!

East vs. West!!

Stalin can't agree on so much US domination in Asia.

East vs. West!!

Waht a game Axis & Allies, you can play, play, play, play, and play untill theres is truly one winner!
Nice report :-)
 
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Harae wrote:
This game should not stop here!!

East vs. West!!

Stalin can't agree on so much US domination in Asia.

East vs. West!!

Waht a game Axis & Allies, you can play, play, play, play, and play untill theres is truly one winner!
Nice report :-)


Thanks. And yes, I imagine this situation devolving rapidly into an Anglo-American versus Soviet fight in Europe. Not only has America dominated Asia, they've actually marched troops through the Soviet heartland and cut off the Soviet forces in Europe!

One of the many things I enjoy about Axis & Allies is imagining the action that is likely to follow a given endgame. I've considered running a single turn or so of "postgame", much like the turn of Invader actions that follows an Invader victory in Fortress America.
 
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I just realized I goofed (by a year) on the dates in this one. The first turn should, naturally, be in 1941, which would put the end of the war in 1948.

Tsk.
 
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Gotthard Heinrici (prev. Graf Strachwitz)
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I am currently trying Axis & Allies with blocks so you can't see if they are Artillery, Tanks or Infantry and with the special actions of Europe Engulfed.
This makes for a much shorter game then EE and very interesting with the special actions which allows you to retreat before battle, blitz attack etc. Still needs some playtesting though.
 
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Don Carmichael
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sanguine wrote:
I just realized I goofed (by a year) on the dates in this one. The first turn should, naturally, be in 1941, which would put the end of the war in 1948.

Tsk.


Nope, the first turn is 1942. Note that the U.S. is already in the war and that there is no pearl harbor battleship.
 
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