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Subject: Britain Abandons The Med, Africa and India rss

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Shane Cagney
United States
Washington
Dist of Columbia
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Allies: Morgan
Germany: Shane (me)
Japan: Carl (host)

Last Saturday, our little DC Area group had a fun 3 player session out in Fairfax, graciously hosted by Carl. Morgan took all three allies and sat above the board. I didn't take notes, so here are my recollections of the game, admittedly through Teutonic-tinted glasses.

Russian stratagy was real meat and potatoes stuff: limited attritional attacks and a build menu strictly of infantry and artillery. Like normal, the Eastern Front came down to die rolls. In one of the hallmarks of this game, the Germans had the best of it. Gradually the Russians were pushed back to the capital, reduced to 1 tank, 1 fighter and an infantry/artillery mix of about 12.

Just for the hell of it, I like to kick off Germany's move with some research. $5 on rockets - it failed. Research refusniks may crack a schadenfreude smile at this, but read on to discover how technology played a role in final victory. Anyway, Germany reinforced Africa and took out the Gibraltar battleship. I always like to compete for Africa and ideally have a German-speaking welcoming party for luckless US troops landing in Algeria. You can imagine my joy when the UK pulled the destroyer and tank back to India, thus freeing up the Med. I had no idea then, and it still seems fantastic now, that the little British tank from Egypt along with those sideshow of a sideshow 3 Australian infantry were later to completely change the course of the war.

Throughout the game Germany had good die rolling. Western Europe threw back the British attacks emanating from their untouchable fleet and the American conveyor belt originating in Canada. The Soviets were steadily being rolled up. Builds were set at tanks and infantry and 1 fighter because nothing smells of German decline like an weakened Luftwaffe. Fighters can also get you over the last hump in Russia.

Things were humming along nicely. The British didn't even attack my Baltic transport (put off by the destroyer, no doubt) and Germany launched a highly speculative attack on Britain: Germany's 1 tank and 1 infantry and 2 fighters against Britain's 1 artillery and 2 infantry and 2 fighters and a bomber. The attack failed overall but wiped out the British defenders; no more pesky Spitfires and Lancasters to deal with.

The British had effectively abandoned the Med and Africa - they reinforced their fleet in India and sailed off to Australia. Japan enthusiastically filled the vacuum and took India. The Japanese had many reasons to be cheerful; lots of money, India and China in the bag and Russia falling back. Kwangtung was industrialized and a 3 tank build regime locked in. Japan's pint-sized tanks had the run of Asia. The only blotches on the Axis copybook were the thus far unchecked British and US fleets in the Pacific. They sailed out there on the fringe but were considered a smidge too strong and remote for Japan to take out just yet.

What should have rung alarm bells in Berlin and Tokyo was the realization that in the Pacific Japan had split her fleet but the Americans and British had united theirs.

The joint fleet invaded New Guinea and Wake. Prudently, Japan pulled 2/3 of her fleet back to home waters and built a couple of ships. Perhaps unwisely however, Tokyo heeded German advice not to interrupt tank production. A Leyte-sized sea battle ensued as almost the entire US fleet swept in from Wake, sacrificing every ship and plane of its own but denuding the island of Japan of naval protection. Ironic that, after we had chirped between ourselves that the Revised Axis and Allies takes a lot of the fun away from playing the US.

In a stroke of genius, Britain spent $30 on Destroyer Bombardment research (rolling two 5s) and invaded Japan. The brave defenders were wiped out by those plucky Australians and one Sherman tank equipped with sand filters.

Unfortunately Japan's remaining fleet was out of position; two turns away and only a single transport with which to mount an attack; an unenviable prospect against 8 newly-minted British infantry. Only minutes before the Axis future had never looked brighter, but we had to concede when our feeble counter assault collapsed.

A very enjoyable game - good company, plenty of big battles and an unexpected ending.
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dave boulton
United Kingdom
etchingham
E. Sussex
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can you under the new rules build on, on the turn you capture an enemy territory then?
 
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Jim Patching
United Kingdom
Newport, Wales
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No you can't, but I think he says that the Japanese fleet was 2 turns away.
 
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wodan wodan
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nice game, something like that happened to me once. I as Germany had captured Moscow... only to have Berlin captured by Great Britain directly after, resulting in the British having triple digit income.
 
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