Recommend
9 
 Thumb up
 Hide
2 Posts

Nexus Ops» Forums » Reviews

Subject: Nexus Ops: the Team Game rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Don Carmichael
United States
Texas
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
My favorite version of Nexus Ops is the four player team game. Since there are already plenty of fine reviews on the game for non-team games I won't go over that again. Instead, I'll explain how the four player game changes what you have read about how the game works.

One major complaint that players have is that in three and four player games, units tend to die off with frightening speed, result in a quick game without many of the fun, high-powered units such as rubium dragons. In the two player game, the combat is too slow, with very few battles being won until at last one player makes a death strike and accomplishes several secret mission cards for victory. In the team game however the combat is somewhere in betwee. Since you have enemies coming from both sides (you play across from your partner) and a much lower income than a two plyer game, you can't stall or create "dead zones" as Axis and Allies players calle them. At the same time, there is no need to attack, attack, attack. Just as in the two player game, if you don't lose battles, they don't get the victory points required to win.

Another complaint is that in the 2 version setups have a major influence on the games. Players who flip over the right exploration tiles in the right places tend to win. However, with teams, it is much easier to combine your forces against the player with the mines you want. It is actually possible, though not very likely, to wipe a player off the board entirely in a team game. This is simply unheard of in a two player game and only occurs only when unfair alliances are formed in three and four player games. That's not to say that the game features player elimination, however, as the only time it happenned in one of my games, my team had nineteen victory points (of the twenty required for victory) and the game was over as soon as the next player took a turn. He was technically eliminated, but certainly didn't sit out for more than thrity seconds. Basically, you have more options in a team game and since all the exploration tiles are equal in actual value (they just can be better are worse depending on location and distribution), any team, even a beginning one, can even out the resource pool through teamwork.

The most glaring aspect I see in three and four player is the glaring insymetry. If one player is squeezed there isn't anything he can do. This remains a minor problem in the team game, however, the victory points his partner receives will also go to him, meaning that he is still very much in the game even though he is faced with overwhelming odds. Some players have a problem with this. I, for one, love the challenge of attempting to hold off the hordes until reinforcements arrive. Since the squeeze is a common tactic used by teams strong on the ground (i.e. in pieces that can't take the monolith), it is almost a given that in some of your games you will be squeezed.

Not that the team game is without flaws, however. Perhaps the biggest flaw in Nexus Ops, that secret mission cards seem kind of like an arbitrary way to win a game and that they add luck to it, still remains (although the card-passing take some of the luck out of it). If you can deal with that, and want a lightweight war game, I know of none better than Nexus Ops as a team game.
2 
 Thumb up
1.00
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
J Mathews
United States
Renton
Washington
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I agree. Nexus Ops is best played as a 4-player team game. Our best games have been like that. The card passing really adds something to the game because good card passing can overcome a lot of bad luck.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.