Introducing Baseball Highlights 2045

As creator of the popular Mystery Rummy series, game designer Mike Fitzgerald has already achieved more than the usual 15 minutes of fame. But with his new game Baseball Highlights: 2045, Mike may just have designed his best game yet. Billed by some as a deck-builder, it certainly does have some deck-building elements, but this is first and foremost a baseball game. There are cards featuring pitchers and batters, there's a baseball diamond, and even base-runners! And you guessed it: a ton of theme! And despite the thematic shine, it features clever game-play that can also be enjoyed by non-sports enthusiasts.

In this card-driven game, players compete over the course of several mini baseball games, each of which is whittled down to playing just six cards, to create a series of plays that are the equivalent of the highlights of an entire game. The year is 2045, and baseball has been revolutionized with the addition of pitchers with bionic arm implants (Cyborgs), machines that are amazing at hitting (Robots), alongside the more traditional human players (Naturals). Can you anticipate what your opponent is going to do, bat in the runs needed to win the game, and achieve victory in the World Series? Let's tell you about this innovative, exciting, clever, and immensely fun new game!



Barry Sosa about to homer

COMPONENTS

Game box

The game box is the usual large and sturdily produced box that we've come to expect from the publisher Eagle-Gryphon Games, and immediately shows us one of the new crop of players that are making waves in 2045: the Robots.



The back of the box introduces the theme, along with an overview of the concept of the game, and a picture of Baseball Highlights 2045 in play.



Component list

Here's what you get inside the box:
● 4x 15-card starting decks
● 1x 60-card free agent deck
● 4x player mats
● 4x reference cards
● batter/runner pawns
● scoring tokens
● rulebook



Let it be said now already that this all comes in a lovely box insert, and there's still oodles of room in the box for expansions - and after playing this thrilling game we're going to want them! The insert was designed to easily accommodate expansions, sleeved cards, and even a second set of cards (e.g. for bringing to a tournament).

Starting decks

Each player gets their own deck of 15 cards, representing one of four different teams: New York, Boston, San Francisco, and Los Angeles. Each decks consist of ten Rookies and five Veterans, but are not exactly identical, with the Veteran players having some slightly different abilities. This gives them a slightly asymmetrical feel, while ensuring that they are still balanced and quite similar.



Each card represents a player, and includes important information such as the player type, an Immediate Action box, a Hit Box representing threatened hits, and the player's speed. We'll explain what this means under the game-play section.



Free Agent deck

The 60-card Free Agent deck contains players with more advanced abilities, which players will be buying at the end of each game and adding to their team. Just as with the starting decks, players are one of three types: Naturals, Cyborgs, or Robots.

Naturals: These are the human players, who are best at fielding.



Cyborgs: These are pitchers with bionic arm implants to improve their pitching.



Robots: These are robotic players skilled at batting and thus add good offense to your team.



There's an additional nice thematic touch that baseball fans will appreciate, because you will recognize many of the first and last names as references to famous players, e.g. "Barry Sosa" is a clear reference to sluggers Barry Bonds and Sammy Sosa.

Player mats

There are four double-sized player stadium mats, each featuring a baseball diamond on which batters will run around the bases in an effort to reach home, as well as scoring tracks, and spots for placing the individual cards and decks that are part of the game.



As an indication of the love that the publisher has poured into this game, each player mat is reversible, so that you can put the decks on the left or the right hand side according to your personal preference.

Pawns

There's a large number of pawns that come with the game, in three different colours that represent the different speeds of the base runners:
● White: slow base runners
● Blue: average base runners
● Red: fast base runners



Pennant tokens

These four double-sided triangular shaped markers are used to indicate whether your team is the Home or Visitor side.



Scoring tokens

In addition there are small cardboard markers that are used for the scoring tracks on the player mats to record runs scored and games won.



Reference cards

Four double-sided player reference cards give an overview of the game and the actions available to you.



Rules

The instructions consist of a 16 page booklet, that includes numerous illustrations, play examples, and also the rules for the first five mini-expansions. You can download the rules on BGG here.



GAME-PLAY

While there are ways to play with 3-4 players, I'll focus on explaining how a 2 player game works, since this is the primary game that the game will be played by most people. Baseball Highlights 2045 has players engage in a series of mini-games, each of which usually involves using six player cards from their 15 man roster.

Set-up

To set-up, each player gets their own player stadium mat and scoring tokens, as well as a Home/Visitor marker. Both players get a starting team deck of 15 players, which is shuffled and placed face-down on the "Line-up" area of their player mat, and from which they each draw a 6 card starting hand. One of these newly drawn cards of your choice can be placed face-down on your On Deck circle, and a new card drawn to fill your hand back to six cards. At the end of each mini-game you'll be buying new players, so also shuffle the free agent deck and deal 6 cards face-up so that you can see what players will become available for purchase later on. The batter/base-runner pawns also need to be within reach. Play ball!



Overview of a turn

Starting with the Visitor team, players now take turns to play one of their six cards, performing the following steps:

1. Play a card: Choose a card from your hand and place it on the "In Play" area in the center of your play mat. Note that as a special play, you can choose to discard a Pinch Hitter card (designated PH on the bottom of the card) from your hand to instead play the card from your On Deck circle.

2. Immediate action: If possible, resolve the Immediate Action (this is written in the Immediate Action box immediately below the card's picture). Examples include things like Glove (cancel one of your opponent's threatened hits), Double Play (remove two of your opponent's base-runners), Fastball (cancel all hits against a Natural). Other immediate actions include offensive and defensive plays like Clutch, Curveball, Knuckleball, Spit Ball, Leadoff, Pick Off, Stolen Base, Quick Eye, and Walk.

3. Resolve opponent's threatened hits: For each of your opponent's threatened hits (which we'll explain in a moment), advance the base runners and move the batters the appropriate number of bases corresponding to the hits stated on the bottom of the card that your opponent currently has "In Play".

4. Place your own threatened hits: Place at your home plate a batter pawn for each hit listed in the Hit Box of the card you just played, using the pawn colour noted on the very bottom of the card. Your threatened hits will resolve on your opponent's next turn.



"He's a Natural!" - a Rookie threatens to hit a single

Overview of a mini-game

Flow of play: The flow of the game can seem a little difficult to wrap your head around at first, but it quickly becomes familiar. Basically what you are doing by playing a card is placing batter pawns that threaten hits (step 4) which will resolve on your opponent's turn (step 3). So on his turn, your opponent will have opportunity to play a card (step 1) to affect your hitters and base-runners with an immediate action of his own (step 2), then your threatened hits will resolve (step 3), and then he'll place threatened hits of his own (step 4) that you'll respond to on your next turn. While it can seem odd at first, it all works rather nicely after you've played a few turns.

Visitor save: Players will play all six cards from their hand in this way (note that you don't draw a new card after playing one!), and then before the Home player's final card resolves, the Visitor gets to play one final card (called a "Visitor Save") to see if its immediate action has any effect in affecting the threatened hits that haven't yet resolved. This final card is taken from the top of the face-down deck or from the players On Deck circle (if that card has not yet been used). At this point, the player with the most runs batted in is the winner!

Extra innings: In the event the game is tied after both players have played their six cards, they each draw three more cards, and the rules outline a procedure of resolving these one at a time to see if a winner can be determined. Just like in real baseball, there are no ties, but we just go to extra innings!



An opening hand of rookies

Buying new players

At the end of a mini-game, players total the number of revenue points (the numbers in green) generated by the six players they've used (plus cards played if there were extra innings). They then take turns using this money to buy new players from the six face up free agents. Players bought in this way go face down to the top of your deck (in other words - they'll immediately become available in the next mini-game). For each player you buy in this way, you need to remove from the game one card out of your just-played cards. By "sending a player to the minors" in this way, you ensure that you keep a 15 card roster of players, and are constantly improving your deck. This is where the deck-building mechanic comes in!



Half a dozen free agents ready to be purchased

Overview of a World Series

The standard two player game consists of three preliminary mini-games played in the above manner, giving players opportunity to improve their decks by adding in free agents. At this point, you begin a best-of-seven-games World Series, with the winner of the preliminary season starting as the Home team for the first two games and the final two games. You continue to buy free agents at the end of each game, so the power of your team will progressively improve from game to game!



San Francisco beats New York 6-1 to take the World Series 4-1

Other formats

The rules provide several other possible ways of playing, including skipping the preliminary three games, and just drafting some players to get right into the seven game World Series. The instructions also describe a three player version of the game, a four player tournament version, and a solitaire version.



Daisuke Darvish drives home the winning runs to secure the World Series

Expansions

While the base game is complete in and of itself, a game like this is just begging for expansions. The good news is that several mini-expansions have already been released, each consisting of around 15 additional cards that add new options for strategy and tactics:
● #1 Coach expansion
● #2 Rally Cap expansion
● #3 Magna Glove expansion = Naturals
● #4 Hitters expansion = Robots
● #5 Pitchers expansion = Cyborgs

These expansions add exciting new possibilities to the gameplay, including new immediate actions (e.g. Rally, Closer, Hold, Teamwork, Magna Glove, Cloning, Gambler, and Replace), as well as some new and modified pitches (e.g. Slider), and coaches.



Note that all five expansions are already included in the deluxe edition of the game (Baseball Highlights: 2045 – Deluxe Edition), but are also available separately. Instructions for these mini-expansions are already part of the rulebook that comes with the base game.

Will there be more expansions? Of course! Two more expansions have already been announced for late 2015:
● #6 Errors! expansion
● #7 Big Fly! expansion

Furthermore twelve new 15-card starter teams are also planned: Chicago, St. Louis, Florida, Milwaukee, Atlanta, Baltimore, Cincinnati, Detroit, Kansas City, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Texas. These will be available individually and in various bundles, to help make it easy for fans to add their favourite team into the game if they wish.



CONCLUSIONS

What do I think?

Outstanding theme: I can't say enough about how impressive the thematic flavour of Baseball Highlights 2045 is. First of all, despite this being entirely a card driven game, Mike Fitzgerald has managed to find a way to make hitters and runners advancing on a baseball diamond as being the central focus of the game - just like real baseball! It's true, there are a few thematic shortcuts taken in the process, the most notable one being the concept of "threatened hits". But once you suspend a certain amount of disbelief and buy into the premise of threatened hits, where do you end up? Right in the familiar world of baseball, complete with double plays and pick-offs, walks and home-runs. It is a remarkable achievement to create the feel and flow of an entire game of baseball in the play of just six cards, and yet Baseball Highlights 2045 manages to accomplish exactly that. It's innovative and highly effective in generating a convincing baseball narrative in a short space of time.

Futuristic back-story: I concede that initially I was somewhat sceptical about the futuristic elements of the theme. Robots and cyborgs playing baseball thirty years in the future? That didn't sound like something that would interest me. But I soon learned that I was very wrong about this. Rather than getting in the way of the game-play or theme, this futuristic back-story quickly becomes part of the charm of Baseball Highlights 2045. Contrary to what I first thought, it wasn't something that would only appeal to sci-fi junkies, but instead helps give credibility to some of the mechanics in areas where the game departs from traditional baseball, while at the same time adding to its appeal precisely because of these differences. As you explore it further, you come to realize that the artwork, mechanics, and theme all fit together beautifully, and the back-story of this futuristic baseball is a fascinating world that's similar enough to the sport as we know it today in order to be recognizable, and yet different enough in order to create added interest. To illustrate the value of this background, check out the wonderful short story that Mike Fitzgerald's daughter wrote (link) which is set in the world of the game. This is the kind of delightful narrative that the game introduces us to and immerses us in. Also see Ralph's highly entertaining geeklist (link) which gives the back-story of some cards, bringing their abilities to life and explaining how their mechanics fit perfectly with the theme. I love it!

For sport fans: Because the theme is so strong, Baseball Highlights 2045 will especially appeal to sports fans and fans of baseball in particular. Some have suggested that you don't need to enjoy baseball to enjoy this game, and I think that is true, although the theme is so strong that without any knowledge of baseball whatsoever you may struggle to play parts of the game. My wife knows nothing about baseball, and although I did manage to play a game with her, I found myself needing to explain how the core elements of baseball work. The game does assume that you know some of these things already, e.g. how a walk impacts the base-runners, or what a pinch hitter is. So without a rudimentary knowledge of these elements, you may run stuck; or as in the case of my wife, you might not enjoy the game enough to want to return to it. But you certainly don't need much baseball knowledge coming in, and this isn't a criticism as such - if anything, it means that sports fans will really love the compelling way that Baseball Highlights 2045 creates something of the drama of baseball, while still remaining very much a game.

Baseball bluff: One of the things I love about baseball is the sense of "bluffing" that the sport requires. Will the pitcher try to blow me away with a fastball strike, or perhaps throw an offspeed outside? Being able to read your opponent's moves in advance is very much part of the real game, and Baseball Highlights 2045 captures this feel beautifully. Often you might have some sense of the cards your opponent has available, but that's when the double think starts: can you plan to use your last card for a confident home run, or will your opponent be keeping his Glove immediate action (cancel a hit) to foil your plans with a timely visitor save? These kinds of decisions require a lot of outguessing and anticipating, and it's one of the things I love both about the real sport and this game.

Economy of action: Considering that each mini-game only consists of each player playing six cards, it's amazing how much Baseball Highlights 2045 manages to pack into playing a single hand. One might think that being restricted to playing just six cards doesn't leave room for many choices. But in fact you'll find that your choices matter a great deal, and it's only by playing your cards carefully and considering what your opponent might have in hand that you can win. Given the restricted hand you begin with, it's really a remarkable achievement that Baseball Highlights 2045 packs as much into playing these cards as it does. Despite having just six cards to work with, it still gives ample scope for skill and bluffing, and generates a surprising amount of theme.

Quick and easy: Baseball Highlights 2045 is not a difficult game to play. An experienced player can quite easily teach a newbie firsthand, and having him playing in fairly short order. In that respect it's a fairly accessible game that has a potentially wide reach. Not only is the game-play itself quite streamlined, but it is also quite speedy. Each mini-game typically only takes 5-10 minutes, so there's a lot happening within a short span of time, giving players a real sense of satisfaction and accomplishment.

Rules wrinkles: Despite the ease in which the game can be learned, there are a few wrinkles that need to be mentioned, and these are one of my few criticisms of the game:

1. The game-play is somewhat counter-intuitive. Your threatened hits are resolved on your opponent's turn, so this means your batters and runners don't advance on your own turn. This isn't a criticism, but it does take some getting used to that most of the action around your bases happens on your opponent's turn rather than your own. I wonder if it would have helped to have included an additional card box labelled "resolve opponent's threatened hits" on the cards themselves, so that you could just work your way down a played card in the course of a turn. For similar reasons, how to choose and use the "On Deck" card to maximum benefit is not immediately apparent, and the strategic potential of this choice may take some time and experience to uncover and maximize.
2. Some rules are unclear. This is more of an issue than the previously stated item. For example, if you browse the forums, you'll find a lot of threads asking about how the visitor save works. The fact is that the rules don't clearly explain that at the end of a mini-game the Home team's threatened hits still need to be resolved. The visitor save is simply about giving opportunity for a final immediate action that could affect this resolution. I pity someone trying to learn the game from the rulebook alone, without access to the BGG forums for help in figuring this out. And there are more omissions like this - e.g. the colour of runners to use for Clutch hits. The fact that the speed of the pawns only affects running rather than hitting is also confusing and could have been stated more clearly. Fortunately there is an excellent FAQ which addresses these and other questions, but one would have thought that some blind playtesting would have uncovered these shortcomings. The good news is that if you learn the game with the help of some videos or from an experienced player this won't be an issue, and undoubtedly if the game ever gets a second edition the rulebook will get the extra polish that it needs. Meanwhile Ralph Anderson on behalf of the publisher and designer Mike Fitzgerald himself are doing an excellent job in actively supporting the game by promptly answering any questions about it here on BGG.

Deck-building elements: I like the fact that a free agent deck comes with the base game, and that's where the deck-building element comes in. While Baseball Highlights 2045 doesn't strongly feel like a deck-builder, yet the deck-building element is there, playing a servant role to the rest of the game. In fact the free agents are very necessary for giving the game extra mileage, and personally I favour playing by skipping the initial three games and instead drafting some players immediately ahead of a seven game World Series. Without the benefit of the stronger free agent players, the game can feel a little less interesting and less exciting. These extra players really help ramp up the fun factor, and that's why it's great that you can enhance the game with free agents to boost your player roster. While this deck-building element isn't the core element of game-play the way it is in something like Dominion, improving your team as the game progresses is an important part of the game's design, and also ensures the addition of interesting new elements as you advance through the mini-games.

Innovative and interactive: One of the criticisms of many deck-building games is that they can feel like a muti-player solitaire experience. Different game designs have explored alternative ways of increasing interaction, such as by adding combat. Baseball Highlights 2045 turns deck-building on its head by adding interaction in a completely new way, in the form of threatened hits and immediate reactions. The action/reaction style of gameplay ensures that there is a constant back-and-forth interactive contest between the players. The concept of "threatened hits" abstracts a thematic idea sufficiently while simultaneously turning it into a brilliant and innovative game mechanism. One thing you can be sure of: you've never played anything like this before! It's a terrific idea, and ensures ongoing interaction in a clever and novel manner. Bravo Mr Fitzgerald!

Welcome expandability: It's no surprise of course that a game like this is expandable. The expansions aren't essential, and the free agent deck that comes with the base game ensures that there's lots of replayability in the box. Nonetheless the already released expansions add some interesting new tactical and strategic options to the gameplay, and I'm confident that all further expansions will be well received, even if they are not essential.

Quality components: As with all recent Eagle-Gryphon games, the quality of the components is more than satisfactory. Special mention can be made of the durable linen-finished cards, good graphic design, immersive artwork, and attractive and functional player boards. The theme is well backed by artwork that reflects the nostalgia of baseball (e.g. the style of the uniforms, player hairstyles, and even the older-style wooden pawns), and even the steam-punk feel that quickly becomes part of the game's charm and makes you at home in its world. In my book, it's a sterling effort all round, and it's gratifying to see that the publisher has given this innovative and fun game design the loving production treatment it deserved.



Preparing for a pick-off

What do others think?

The criticism

Although it's still early days, Baseball Highlights 2045 hasn't really attracted any major criticisms so far. If it does have any blemishes, they would be the ones that I've already mentioned, such as the need for rulebook clarifications, and the somewhat counter-intuitive and almost clunky flow of play. Interestingly, despite the many threads with rules questions, most people aren't complaining too much about this concern, so if it is a weakness, clearly it's one that is easy enough to overlook and to overcome. A small minority has suggested that Baseball Highlights 2045 isn't their cup of tea because of the back-and-forth tactical play, or that the initial three mini-games makes the game longer than it should be. As mentioned already, my own experience with the game was that the theme's strength and close link to the mechanics meant that I loved it whereas the non-sports buffs in my family found it more inaccessible and uninteresting for the same reason. But a larger number of commenters have suggested that the game-play is abstracted sufficiently that they've seen it be well-received even by gamers who don't enjoy baseball at all. But overall any criticisms are minor, and are overwhelmingly buried by the abundant praise for the game.

The praise

With critics barely raising a peep, clearly the fans are the overwhelming majority, and with good reason. Here are some of the positive things they have to say about why they like Baseball Highlights 2045. Read them all - seriously - it will give you a good idea about why this game is generating so much enthusiasm!

"Wow, I haven’t been this instantly smitten by a game for a while. I love the way it abstracts almost all the details of baseball away but still captures the feel of the game so well." - Martin G
"I am in awe of this design. Distilling an inning of baseball down to a single card play should be either impossible or require a a ridiculous amount of charts and die rolling. Not so. Each card played resolves quickly, simply and clearly. And it's more exciting than you can imagine." - Jeff Pratt
"This game is more fun than it has any right to be (especially since I am not an enormous fan of baseball to begin with)." - Peter Bogdasarian
"This game is excellent. I love how the theme is integrated." - Adam Daulton
"A solid effort that runs counter to the general truism, `Sports games stink'." - Glenn Overby
"A highly innovative deck-building mechanism layered with several features that make it quick-paced and tension-filled." - Larry Chong
"I've gotta say, this game really surprised the heck outta me. I read the reviews about it, but just couldn't see what seemed to be so good about it. Now that I've played it...I was completely wrong about this game, it's a real blast to play. Lots and lots of fun, and I'm not a a big baseball fan." - Jared Wilson
"Normally, I don't rate games until they've been out for 10 years. I'm making an exception for Mike's very innovative game." - Tom Lehmann
"A killer innovation on deckbuilding which is played out over a series of mini-games, involving a great strategic back & forth that simulates a baseball game quite well." - Scott Waldie
"Best sports themed game I have played." - Mark Mistretta
"Really a fun game. The games go quick and there are a lot of interesting decisions to make. Feels a lot like baseball, even though you are only really playing highlight reels." - Tim McCormley
"Light, fast, enjoyable interactive deckbuilder, even more so if you are a fan at all of baseball." - Bob Rademaker
"Absurdly good. You want to take hours of downtime, throw them out the window, and just cut to the "highlights"? This is the game. It is a master achievement for the designer." - Tim Royal
"Not big on baseball but this game is flipping amazing." - Dachshund Daddy
"I just love this game. It really captures the feel of the sport in a fast-playing, exciting, and strategic game." - Tony Fanchi
"Fun game that catches the essence of baseball and building a team. Not a stats game, rather a deck building one." - Fred Shugars
"This is a fantastic game that catches the "feel" of baseball without being a simulation of baseball." - Mark Jackson
"I am more impressed with this game every time it hits the table Scratches both the sports fan itch and the gamer itch." - Avri Klemer
"This game has some new and great mechanics, while putting the baseball theme front and center, but still being accessible to those that don't really know the game." - Jan Beighley, Jr.
"My favorite sport related card game. Brilliant baseball simulation." - Paul Incao
"I've bought fifty games this year so far, and this is my favorite of them." - Tim Royal
"Very clever simulation of baseball, distilled into a quick playing card game." - Dave Moss
"This game is a walk-off home run. Easy to learn, plays smooth and quick, and is full of tense decisions and exciting plays." - Matt Smith



Recommendation

So is Baseball Highlights: 2045 for you? This is an outstanding game in every way, and one of the most exciting and innovative game designs I've seen in the last year. Mike Fitzgerald has come up with a brilliant game system that does a terrific job of capturing the theme and feel of baseball, while ensuring that the game-play itself doesn't degenerate into a statistical slug-fest, but sustains constant interest and interaction through a meaningful series of quick and clever card plays. This is definitely one of my favourite new recent games, and is a title that is definitely going to go places, and should cement Mike Fitzgerald's already solid reputation as a game designer for years to come.

Baseball Highlights 2045 will appeal to most gamers, but sports fans in particular should not miss this gem. I consider it a grand slam home run, and recommend it very highly!



Gearing up to drive in a run

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Michael Drog
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Awesome review, Awesome game! One of my favorites.
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Jonathan Meltzer
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Great review! One small nitpick - when it comes time to buy Free Agents, you include any cards played during Extra Innings when counting up the revenue. You stated that you use the six cards played, which is usually true, but with Extra Innings there can be more.
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Peter Kossits
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So that's what all the fr*kkin pictures last week were for!

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Martin G
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Great review Ender, you captured the feel perfectly. This is the game I've been most excited by this year by far.
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Tom C.
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Pretty special review of a pretty special game. This game became almost an instant favorite when I first learned it. Whatever else it is, it is fun first. My brother and I cheered more than once when we played it, and I knew I had something special when I caught myself smiling. Thanks for sharing it with our terrific gaming community!
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Ralph H. Anderson
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Thank you Ender! Beautiful pictures and outstanding review. We are honored that you enjoyed the game and have given it such an glowing review!

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Ralph
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The Compulsive Completist
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Great review! I've been waiting for all those pictures to get attached to something.
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Hockey Mask wrote:
Great review! I've been waiting for all those pictures to get attached to something.

Thanks, and don't the photos make you just want to be playing the game?!

For example this picture (which didn't make it into the review) is from an actual game I played recently - a dream starting hand with the World series on the line! Yessir, please Play Ball!

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Chris
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Great review! Thanks for posting. Recently started playing this game, and I love it so far. At some point I'll have to start adding in the deluxe expansions, but I'm really enjoying the base game for now.
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Mizerak wrote:
Great review! One small nitpick - when it comes time to buy Free Agents, you include any cards played during Extra Innings when counting up the revenue. You stated that you use the six cards played, which is usually true, but with Extra Innings there can be more.

I had originally left that part out in order to focus on the main game-play elements, rather than attempt to cover every detail.

But I've since made an edit to include mention of this point, to avoid causing any confusion. Thanks Jonathan!
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Reed Dawley
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I feel bad for people who dismiss sports games, they never get to experience this super fun game.
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Rick Teverbaugh
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Mizerak wrote:
Great review! One small nitpick - when it comes time to buy Free Agents, you include any cards played during Extra Innings when counting up the revenue. You stated that you use the six cards played, which is usually true, but with Extra Innings there can be more.


That's not true though if you're playing in a tournament or a 4-player setup.
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Jonathan Meltzer
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rickert wrote:
Mizerak wrote:
Great review! One small nitpick - when it comes time to buy Free Agents, you include any cards played during Extra Innings when counting up the revenue. You stated that you use the six cards played, which is usually true, but with Extra Innings there can be more.


That's not true though if you're playing in a tournament or a 4-player setup.


I did not realize that - I have only played solo and two-player. Sorry if I caused a correction that did not need to be made.
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Rick Teverbaugh
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Anderson
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Mizerak wrote:
rickert wrote:
Mizerak wrote:
Great review! One small nitpick - when it comes time to buy Free Agents, you include any cards played during Extra Innings when counting up the revenue. You stated that you use the six cards played, which is usually true, but with Extra Innings there can be more.


That's not true though if you're playing in a tournament or a 4-player setup.


I did not realize that - I have only played solo and two-player. Sorry if I caused a correction that did not need to be made.


No, I think adding that bit of info is good but I just thought that clarification needed to be added so people wouldn't think you could gain an advantage in multiplayer by trying for extra innings.
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Tim Royal
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Kirkland
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Your reviews, Ender, man, they're amazing.

If you were a board game, I'd buy you.
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Jesse Carrasco
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Los Angeles
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Thanks for this review. I'm so intrigued by this game. I keep coming back to it and wonder whether or not I should bite the bullet and just get it. Seeing all of your pictures made me decide to go ahead and purchase it. It's too good looking of a game to pass up.
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Update: Since this review was published, a few new expansions have come out, and I have had opportunity to explore them and review them. A couple of deluxe editions of Baseball Highlights 2045 have also been released. Additionally, there's a great app that is now available, which implements the solitaire version of the game.

I have posted a separate review which gives more info about the deluxe versions, the expansions, and the app here:

Ender's Comprehensive Pictorial Overview: A guide to all the expansions and deluxe editions of Baseball Highlights 2045
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