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Subject: Give me an example of bluffing rss

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David B
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I have seen examples of bluffing in games like Biblios and I can see how a well timed bluff can really turn the tables. I realize there is room and potential for bluffing in Haggis but I cannot think of an example of where I have used a bluff. I would like to hear some concrete examples of bluffs in this game and how it turned out for you. I would love to add a few of these tricks to my toolbox when playing this. Because I stink.
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Sean Ross
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Hm. For me, it's more about surprising or trapping than bluffing: playing to lull the opponent into a false sense of security, then blasting them with a sequence of three triples, say, or maybe five consecutive pairs. Bluffing, to my mind, is pretending strength where none exists; my play in Haggis is more often to pretend weakness when, in fact, you have all of the power.

So, for instance, here's one ploy that I learned from Mark Klassen (someone who's played well over a thousand games of Haggis, yet still has a 70% win percentage): sometimes, you might want to play a single Jack to a singleton trick, rather than playing a 10; or you could play a Jack as a wild 10 to form a larger combo, even though you could have used a natural 10 in its place.

Since there are unknown cards in the Haggis, this play can lead your opponent to assume you don't have any 10's, which could make them overconfident in singleton tricks or any other type of trick where they know a 10 would be needed to beat them. So, if, say, you have no wild cards left, then they may mistakenly spend their last wild thinking the 10 in their own hand will be strong enough to see them out of the hand - and then you can show them how wrong they were at just the right moment. It's delicious.

The Jack played to a singleton trick can also prompt an opponent to top your Jack with either the King or Queen, sucking out power from their hand and leaving them with the lower-powered face card bomb. If the opponent passes instead of spending a higher wild card, then you still get the lead and that can often be worth the loss of your lowest wild card....
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The other Euro guy
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Another example would be "no bidding" a strong hand. Unaware of your strength your opponent may not try to ditch their cards as quickly as they might have done with better information. You can catch them with a fistful when you end the game.
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Chris Rogers
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seandavidross wrote:
Hm. For me, it's more about surprising or trapping than bluffing: playing to lull the opponent into a false sense of security, then blasting them with a sequence of three triples, say, or maybe five consecutive pairs. Bluffing, to my mind, is pretending strength where none exists; my play in Haggis is more often to pretend weakness when, in fact, you have all of the power.

So, for instance, here's one ploy that I learned from Mark Klassen (someone who's played well over a thousand games of Haggis, yet still has a 70% win percentage): sometimes, you might want to play a single Jack to a singleton trick, rather than playing a 10; or you could play a Jack as a wild 10 to form a larger combo, even though you could have used a natural 10 in its place.

Since there are unknown cards in the Haggis, this play can lead your opponent to assume you don't have any 10's, which could make them overconfident in singleton tricks or any other type of trick where they know a 10 would be needed to beat them. So, if, say, you have no wild cards left, then they may mistakenly spend their last wild thinking the 10 in their own hand will be strong enough to see them out of the hand - and then you can show them how wrong they were at just the right moment. It's delicious.

The Jack played to a singleton trick can also prompt an opponent to top your Jack with either the King or Queen, sucking out power from their hand and leaving them with the lower-powered face card bomb. If the opponent passes instead of spending a higher wild card, then you still get the lead and that can often be worth the loss of your lowest wild card....


When I first played Haggis, I didn't really enjoy it. But then I sat down with a friend of mine to hammer it out, since I so loved Tichu and felt like I might be missing something.

One of us played a J as a 10, and the game clicked. Suddenly, it was like trying to swallow the ocean in a single gulp.

Great game!
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