Jayson Myers
United States
Clermont
Florida
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Please check out my other reviews at:

http://www.boardgamegeek.com/geeklist/145695/item/2728438#it...



Conclusion:

Lost Cities: The Board Game is a solid little family game. I like the ease of it and I modify it slightly for smaller kids (no negatives, but that is just me). Otherwise, I like how kids can play cards and count and have to think about their moves. I see the little eyes in my daughter grasp the concepts little by little.

I also played this game with gamers and it went over fine as a little light game. Everyone wanted to keep playing and enjoyed the experience. Sure, there is luck in this game and maybe quite a bit of it, so some may feel like they were "screwed" during the game, but over three rounds hopefully that can be overcame. I'm not keen on the "play the game three times that equals one time", but that is to keep down the wild swings this game can have. It is quite possible for someone to run away with the game, but unlikely the same person would do it multiple times over three games.

The game has nice components and the board is nice and colorful. The game is easy to teach and easy to learn. The game is simple, but there are hard decisions to be made in the game. At the end of the day, you are collecting cards for colors and playing them as close to numerical order as you can. There isn't a ton in this game, but it does add some other things (artifacts) from the card game.

Not a bad edition to expand the card game. The card game is a classic. The board game is too similar to the card game to be considered a classic, but this is a good, light board game that families can enjoy. It is a numbers game and the mechancis are simple, but that is where it shines. You can play this with nearly any person on the planet if they can count.


Keeper.




Components:

Wood/plastic: You get 5 meeples in 4 different colors, of which one is larger than the others. You get a few tiles that are randomly assigned around the board. These are high quality components.

Cards: The cards are nice and shuffle well. You will be shuffling these cards a lot as they need to be shuffled well before playing. Like really well. The cards are high quality and easy to read and use. They have different pictures on them, so they should be color blind friendly.

Art: The art is pleasing enough. It isn't groundbreaking or particularly interesting, but it works fine and won't offend.

Board: The board is nice and big, but is really just a few trails that lead to numbers used for scoring.

Type of money/vp: We get some VP chits that are used between games. They are small, but work for the intended purpose.

Final Grade: The components are good, but nothing we haven't seen before. This is a well crafted boar game with very good components. You will not be disappointed or feel they went cheap on this game.




Rule Book:

Color/B/W: Color

Pictures of components: Yes

Picture of game set up: Yes

Pictures included: Yes

Example of playing the game: No

How long to read the book: 10 Minutes

Player Aid: No

The rules are very simple to learn. The rule book is just a single page front and back. You have two things to do on a turn: Play a card then Draw a card. If you have played the card game you will be able to pick this game up with zero problems.



Flow of the Game:

Goal of the Game:

The goal of the game is to score the most victory points over three games (or rounds).

How it plays:

You will play a card each round in numerical order to move your adventurers down different paths to score VP.

A turn:

1. Play a card: You can either play a card to the table or discard a card.

A. Play a card: cards are played in numerical order and a higher card must always go on top of a lower numbered card and are sorted by color. Playing a card will make your pawn move down the trial of that color. Each spot on the trail is worth points (negative or positive). There are also places you can get tiles which might move your pawns more, give you VP, or get you more artifacts (worth VP at end of game).

B. Discard: Cards are discarded to piles based on color.

2. Draw a card: You can either draw from the supply card or the top card of any of the discard piles that are sorted by color.

--------------------------------------------------------

The decisions in the game come from which pawns to move down which trial. It is likely you don't want to start every trail as you won't have time (or the cards) to get to the positive points. So, you have to decide which trails you will go down and which cards to play. Do you play that 6 now (which means number below it can't be played) or wait and see if you can get something lower to start the trail?

The decisions are straight forward, but it doesn't make anything easier. There is some press your luck to the numbers you play, but there is also luck in which cards you draw. But your opponents discard cards that can try to help you. There are some interesting things going on in this game.





Should I buy this game?:

This is a solid family game that gamers can play for a light game. I would recommend this over the card game as this plays 2-4, instead of just two. There is a tad more going on in this game and a tad more luck maybe, but I think I prefer this over the card game.

Keeper.


*The images posted with this review are not mine and are images I found on BGG. If you click on the image, you can see who posted it to BGG.
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Jason Webster
United States
Connecticut
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It's Keltis with a lost cities theme. Great family game. I like playing Keltis more than Lost cities the card game.
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Garth van Doorn
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I'd take the Lost Cities theme over the more abstract Keltis. It's much of a muchness though. They both evolved from (and improved on) the original Lost Cities card game.

One thing that bugs me with this game is that they neglected to incorporate the necessary decks of cards into the board design. It would only take minor tweaks to have space for the draw pile in the middle (at the nexus of the paths) and a discard pile in each colour. You can sort of do this but there's not *quite* room.
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Corey Hopkins
United States
Converse
Indiana
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dzudz wrote:
I'd take the Lost Cities theme over the more abstract Keltis. It's much of a muchness though. They both evolved from (and improved on) the original Lost Cities card game.

One thing that bugs me with this game is that they neglected to incorporate the necessary decks of cards into the board design. It would only take minor tweaks to have space for the draw pile in the middle (at the nexus of the paths) and a discard pile in each colour. You can sort of do this but there's not *quite* room.


We always put the discard piles on the "50" spot for each color and we have put the draw pile in the middle of the board before. It's a little tight but it works. You just might have to look around the stack to see the start of a path at the beginning of a game.

Nice review, BTW! We really like this one as a gameway game or just a light "non brain-burner" game. There's plenty of luck, but some interesting choices as well. My only gripe that you didn't mention was the single-sided point tokens. Those things always bug me!
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Sky Zero
United States
Illinois
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This one is still a favorite of mine I'd happily play anytime.
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Jayson Myers
United States
Clermont
Florida
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Dnasearchr wrote:
It's Keltis with a lost cities theme. Great family game. I like playing Keltis more than Lost cities the card game.


I've never played Keltis
 
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