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Subject: Lore rss

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wulung chuanfa
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So I really love the lore and backstory of this game and was wondering (for those who already have their copies) how much of the lore is in the printed materials that come with the came and also how much of it seems to come through in the gameplay?


Thanks and have a great day!


Michael
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Bitchy Little Boy
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You can find the (non-Kickstarter) printed material on the NSKN website.

Actually - and this is no criticism of Błażej Kubacki's gripping style - the lore is technical writing rather than fiction. The stories are built around the features of the locations, enemies, and hero decks and it is their purpose to flesh out the characters and the places in the game. This is why these presentations do help create a smoother and more vivid overview of the game even more than Andrei's background story in Exodus.

P.S. The flavour text on the cards complements the lore included with the quests.

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wulung chuanfa
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Thanks for the reply!
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Nigel Buckle
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How much immersion you get with the game depends on how you approach it.

If you abstract the game play, just play the cards for their effect, don't bother to say the names of the cards you play, then you'll find it dry.

In essence the game is a number of fights until you get to the final (boss). However the characters are all different, the enemies all have different abilities (and their mechanics fit), and most cards (all I can't remember) have some flavour text at the bottom.

So if you read (out loud if playing multiplayer) the scenario introduction and give a bit of commentary as you play (just the card names, or if you don't mind the extra time, the flavour text) then for me the game has lots of immersion. More so than say Pathfinder.
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Ryan Chambers
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I find it on the dry side. The heavily mechanical nature of the card and tile text, missed opportunities in other places (I'm looking at you quest tokens), and the complex turn structure really puts the onus squarely on the player to provide the color. More-so than probably any game I've played of this type (i.e. solitaire-friendly dungeon crawlers with card-driven mechanics).
 
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Mike Clarke
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chamr wrote:
I find it on the dry side. The heavily mechanical nature of the card and tile text, missed opportunities in other places (I'm looking at you quest tokens), and the complex turn structure really puts the onus squarely on the player to provide the color. More-so than probably any game I've played of this type (i.e. solitaire-friendly dungeon crawlers with card-driven mechanics).


I disagree completely. This is one of the most, if not the most, thematic card game I've ever played.

The character decks personalize the heroes beautifully:

Arani, the cleric, who assists the party in numerous ways far beyond simple healing, is also a tremendous fanatical, Holy warrior laying down the Divine fire and crushing opponents with her Mace. Her complete and total devotion to the Dawnmother gives her sect a reputation as a cult, their penchant for rushing headlong into battle means there aren't many of her kind left. She feels and plays more like a cleric than almost any other game I've played.

Fengray, the fighter with his Cleave can kill two enemies at once, or (with Lunge and Mighty Strike), hit for 14 points of damage when five will kill most enemies, making him the penultimate boss killer. When you play him, you feel the role.

The mechanics of the game fall away after several plays as gameplay is really not that complex although there is a learning curve. The mechanics stay with you because they are logical and make sense.

There is engaging text on every card.

Fengray's Lunge: The weight of your sword and the arm that wields it is enough to fell a might foe. But what if you really put your back into it?

Ominous Silence (a Time card): Not a single bird, not a single beast would pierce the silence with its voice. It gave us a small measure of peace, but we knew it was not meant to last.

That kind of text sets the stage, if you take the time to read it, for gameplay where the events in each location and the contest they present create a story far more vivid than many other games.

My wife and I love Mistfall, so for me, this game's a keeper.
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Stephen Martin
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mikecl wrote:
chamr wrote:
I find it on the dry side. The heavily mechanical nature of the card and tile text, missed opportunities in other places (I'm looking at you quest tokens), and the complex turn structure really puts the onus squarely on the player to provide the color. More-so than probably any game I've played of this type (i.e. solitaire-friendly dungeon crawlers with card-driven mechanics).


I disagree completely. This is one of the most, if not the most, thematic card game I've ever played.

The character decks personalize the heroes beautifully:

Arani, the cleric, who assists the party in numerous ways far beyond simple healing, is also a tremendous fanatical, Holy warrior laying down the Divine fire and crushing opponents with her Mace. Her complete and total devotion to the Dawnmother gives her sect a reputation as a cult, their penchant for rushing headlong into battle means there aren't many of her kind left. She feels and plays more like a cleric than almost any other game I've played.

Fengray, the fighter with his Cleave can kill two enemies at once, or (with Lunge and Mighty Strike), hit for 14 points of damage when five will kill most enemies, making him the penultimate boss killer. When you play him, you feel the role.

The mechanics of the game fall away after several plays as gameplay is really not that complex although there is a learning curve. The mechanics stay with you because they are logical and make sense.

There is engaging text on every card.

Fengray's Lunge: The weight of your sword and the arm that wields it is enough to fell a might foe. But what if you really put your back into it?

Ominous Silence (a Time card): Not a single bird, not a single beast would pierce the silence with its voice. It gave us a small measure of peace, but we knew it was not meant to last.

That kind of text sets the stage, if you take the time to read it, for gameplay where the events in each location and the contest they present create a story far more vivid than many other games.

My wife and I love Mistfall, so for me, this game's a keeper.

I agree with you that the hero decks are very thematically strong and I enjoy them immensely. I also appreciate the lore and background included in the quest guides, which enhance the mythology of the world and give the characters some nice, if a little cliche, backgrounds. I also appreciate the thematic touches of the quests, particularly the Black Crusade and how Sycra must be defeated.

Your experience is similar to mine, as my wife and I are finding the game to be very fun, challenging, and collaborative. A lot of that fun stems directly from the enjoyment we get out of our chosen characters' unique abilities and playstyles (she likes Venda, I'm a fan of Celenthia but often grab Fengray instead).

I'm curious (and not trying to be contrarian) about how you're managing 14 damage with Fengray. Are you just adding together the damage from two separate actions with Master Strike or is there some super combo I'm not yet aware of? The best I can manage with him in one action (with no collaborative help from other heroes) is a Lunge plus the Regular Action of his Ancient Blade + 3 discards for 8 damage (throw in a whetstone for 9).

Penultimate means "second to last" by the way (now I am being contrarian...). Still true, IMO, because I find Venda to be the ultimate boss killer.
 
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Mike Clarke
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Fnar wrote:
Penultimate means "second to last" by the way (now I am being contrarian...). Still true, IMO, because I find Venda to be the ultimate boss killer.

LOL...I'll be damned if you're not right. You learn something new every day. Good to know for future reference too.

So yes eight damage with Fengray and the War Sword on top of the Deck using Fengray's "Never Defenceless" ability.

Play Master Strike which says Draw 3 cards and put a weapon in my Hero area and then use any one action on a weapon in my Hero area thereby allowing War Sword to strike for another six points of damage. (I'm paraphrasing here because I don't' have the card in front of me).

Three damage from the War Sword and three discards= six damage. 8+6=14.

Of course in Sigraed's case (the last time I used this) she absorbed three on each strike for a total of 14-6= 8 damage.

The only downside to this is Fengray starts his next turn with his War Sword in the discard pile. (But he still has an Axe!!)
 
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Stephen Martin
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Yeah, one thing I am finding (for good or for ill) is that several of my successful games of Mistfall end in a hand- and hero-area-clearing final super combo gambit that really nails the boss, after which I can usually manage to eat the counter attack from any of their buddies.

Not all the time, and the journey there is always certainly a wonderful puzzle. Probably why I enjoy the Black Crusade so much.
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Mike Clarke
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Fnar wrote:
Yeah, one thing I am finding (for good or for ill) is that several of my successful games of Mistfall end in a hand- and hero-area-clearing final super combo gambit that really nails the boss, after which I can usually manage to eat the counter attack from any of their buddies.

Not all the time, and the journey there is always certainly a wonderful puzzle. Probably why I enjoy the Black Crusade so much.

Myself as well. In Fengray's case he doesn't need to deal that many wounds and Mighty Strike gets buried when he uses it, so he usually doesn't buy it until just before the Boss fight. Until then he's better off with Cleave (I buy him two for 3 Resolve apiece) each of which gives him two Regular attacks if he kills an enemy with his first one. That way he can take down crowds until he gets to the boss.

I'm just about to try Black Crusade and I see Sycra is untouchable until the Blackwood Fighters are dealt with so I see what you mean. By the way, in that Scenario when the Quest pamphlet talks about Special Enemy life, it means Sycra, not the Fighters, yeah?
 
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