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Subject: Status Check?? rss

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Confusion Under Fire
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I am looking for the WW2 phrase used when the squad leader or platoon leader wanted to know the state of his unit during a firefight, maybe when pinned or just after being ambushed. He might shout out for each man or squad leader to call out the casualties. It would be something like a "status check" but this feels like a modern phrase.
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Aaron Yoder
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SitRep got its first use in the 1940s.
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Jason Sadler
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What you are talking about is an ACE report. ACE = Ammunition, Casualties, Equipment. This is the fast report that occurs during the consolidation phase after an assault.

A SITREP goes to higher to describe a situation and varies depending on what you have been told to do.

Here's a random Army pub reports:

3. REPORTS. The following reports are used.

(1) SALUTE--Size, Activity, Location, Unit/uniform, Time, Equipment.

(2) SITREP--(situation report) given IAW OPORD.

(3) ACE--(ammunition, casualty, equipment) normally, squad leaders give ACE reports to the platoon sergeant after contact with the enemy.

(4) Logistics--team leaders and squad leaders report twice daily up the chain of command.

(5) Sensitive item--status reported by team leaders and squad leaders up the chain of command twice daily.

(6) Personnel status--team leaders and squad leaders report twice daily. Normally, reports are given at stand-to and before nightfall.

(7) NBC 1 and NBC 4--whoever recognizes an NBC attack will report on the platoon net and preface the message with FLASH-FLASH-FLASH. NBC 1 and 4 reports are sent to the company CP and then forwarded to battalion.

(8) After Action Report

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Jim F
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I've read dozens of WW2 memoirs and don't remember casualties being reported back in the manner your post suggests - possibly because shouting out casualties during a firefight is giving the enemy potentially important information, also it's unlikely to be communicated in an effective manner with the confusion of battle all around them. Not to mention the obvious dangers of moving around to find out who has been killed/wounded and then finding you are amongst the casualties.

I have read accounts of tallies being taken during lulls in the fighting where replacement soldiers/NCO's are found from a platoon that has taken less casualties, or from LOB's etc... but this is organised at the Platoon level, as a minimum and more likely at company level.

Not sure this is helpful but this is just what I've come across.



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Edmund Hon
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Isn't "What the f@#k is going on?" pretty appropriate from the platoon sergeant?
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Neal Durando
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For the US in WW2, casualty reports were usually company-level morning reports which were sent up the chain. Usually, company morning report numbers show up in a regimental strength report with 24-48 hours delay.

I've never seen SALUTE (an intelligence report), SITREP, SPOT, or any other modern types of reporting in a WW2 context. There were fragmentary orders, based of off divisional field orders (all given numbers) but I've never heard of one called a FRAGO.

Intelligence, especially, was a much more ad hoc effort than it is today. Usually intelligence was gathered , assimilated, and diffused from regiment or even division. As such it was often out-of-touch and superficial. Mostly, it depended on interrogation of enemy P/Ws (prisoners of war) and civilian hearsay picked up on the battlefield.
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Confusion Under Fire
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Ashiefan wrote:

I've read dozens of WW2 memoirs and don't remember casualties being reported back in the manner your post suggests - possibly because shouting out casualties during a firefight is giving the enemy potentially important information, also it's unlikely to be communicated in an effective manner with the confusion of battle all around them. Not to mention the obvious dangers of moving around to find out who has been killed/wounded and then finding you are amongst the casualties.

I have read accounts of tallies being taken during lulls in the fighting where replacement soldiers/NCO's are found from a platoon that has taken less casualties, or from LOB's etc... but this is organised at the Platoon level, as a minimum and more likely at company level.

Not sure this is helpful but this is just what I've come across.




Definitely helpful as is all information.

I am currently designing a game, for personal use, with elements of FoW and unit elimination is unknown until checked by either player. The unit is only then removed from play. The "eliminated" unit still on the map cannot undertake any actions but it is possible for players to be unaware of its exact status until checked. I wanted to give the act of checking a units status a title, hence the reason for this thread.
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