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Subject: A warning to wargamers about fake paypal emails. rss

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Jim F
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If you are fed up with your job and thinking of trying a bit of fraud as a sideline, I should warn you that it will take a better effort than from this lot. See if you can spot how this might not have been a real email from paypal.

Dear member,

You must confirme your Account informations
Why my account access is Iimited.........
We noticed some unusual log in activity with your account. Please confirm your account to help us check that no one has logged into your account without your permission.
Provide the information associated with your account.
The sooner your provide the information we need, the sooner we can resolve the situation.
please follwo this link :

Confirme here

thank you,
support team


Unless of course I am giving paypal more credit than they deserve!
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Caleb
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I've often said, if these guys would take an ESL course for a few weeks, they'd probably increase their hit rate by 1000%.
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Lance Runolfsson
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But this stuff actually works for them. I have a friend that was an armored car driver. He said that one of the Cashiers at a customer service counter in a grocery store told him they get several people a month sending large money orders to Nigeria etc.. The people would get so angry when they tried to warn it was a scam that they gave up trying.
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Barry Harvey
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If you do get something like this, paypal suggests you forward it to spoof@paypal.com.

Whether they do anything about it, and what they can do about it, I don't know, but certainly nothing can be attempted if they don't have any reports of problems.
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http://www.419eater.com/

Check out the above site for Nigerian scammer-based hilarity.
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Francisco Gutierrez
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Re: A warning to wargamers about fake paypal emails.
Thank for the warning. We take warning much seriously. Please provide me you PayPal imfo so we can report scams. Great reward for you.

PayPol official Support team
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Osprey
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This is the same wording you will find in most phishing emails.
1) They don't use your real name first and foremost. Any company that is having a real issue will always use your name and not a "Dear Member" or anything else like that.
2) They ask for your account info. No company will do that via an email like above.
3) Of course they try to scare you with the "unusual activity" subject and unfortunately it works on some people. And of course they need it ASAP.

Seems to be a pretty standard template for a lot of phishing mails. I suppose if they can get one out of hundred to answer with the info it's worth it to them.
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Steven
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cannoneer wrote:
I've often said, if these guys would take an ESL course for a few weeks, they'd probably increase their hit rate by 1000%.

Actually, the misspellings are often intentional. For a variety of reasons, those 'errors' can make it more likely that those liable to be scammed will be pulled in for it.
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Confusion Under Fire
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patton1138 wrote:
cannoneer wrote:
I've often said, if these guys would take an ESL course for a few weeks, they'd probably increase their hit rate by 1000%.

Actually, the misspellings are often intentional. For a variety of reasons, those 'errors' can make it more likely that those liable to be scammed will be pulled in for it.

Exactly what I was going to say. I was reading each post thinking I am going to post that it is done on purpose and then this last post said exactly that. Beaten to it.
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Some people with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder have a hard time ignoring these sorts of email as well, even when they recognize them as scams.

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Russ Williams
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patton1138 wrote:
cannoneer wrote:
I've often said, if these guys would take an ESL course for a few weeks, they'd probably increase their hit rate by 1000%.

Actually, the misspellings are often intentional. For a variety of reasons, those 'errors' can make it more likely that those liable to be scammed will be pulled in for it.
I've sometimes read this, but I don't understand why some victims would be MORE likely to respond if the email is full of typos and language errors. What is the psychological explanation for that? I can imagine some people not noticing the errors, and so being NO LESS likely to fall for the scam despite the errors, but I can't really imagine being MORE likely to fall for the scam if they notice the errors. "Oh, well since this email is full of typing errors, it must be really important and legitimate" or whatever. What's the explanation for the victim psychology supposedly explaining the errors as intentional?

Edited to add: Sag just commented "Some people with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder have a hard time ignoring these sorts of email as well, even when they recognize them as scams."

I notice the errors (somewhat compulsively) but that doesn't make me think "Oh, this must be a legitimate serious email from paypal." It just makes me think "Oh, this was written by a not very literate person."

Is the theory that the people somehow are mysteriously compelled to respond and reveal their private info, even though they know it's obviously a stupid scam and not really from paypal, just because they are compulsively boggled/distracted/hypnotized/distracted by the bad typing?
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Francisco Gutierrez
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russ wrote:

I've sometimes read this, but I don't understand why some victims would be MORE likely to respond if the email is full of typos and language errors.

Yeah I thought the same thing until I googled it. Apparently it is a preliminary screening of sorts.

If you are willing to believe that the garbled mess of an email is legitimate then you are either incredibly gullible or not very intelligent (note: I don't mean this an insult to those who do not speak English well)

So by pre screening people who aren't easily duped, they get people to respond who are already a bit convinced and easily tricked.
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Mike Hoyt

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Osprey wrote:
This is the same wording you will find in most phishing emails.
1) They don't use your real name first and foremost. Any company that is having a real issue will always use your name and not a "Dear Member" or anything else like that.
2) They ask for your account info. No company will do that via an email like above.
3) Of course they try to scare you with the "unusual activity" subject and unfortunately it works on some people. And of course they need it ASAP.

Seems to be a pretty standard template for a lot of phishing mails. I suppose if they can get one out of hundred to answer with the info it's worth it to them.

Mr. Wade Hyatt,

Sir, the IRS has taken notice of your illegal transfer of funds to Nigeria, a country on the US No Trade list, for the ostensible purpose of funding a bird watching sanctuary. Due to the philanthropic nature of your donation, we are inclined to waive the otherwise mandated criminal penalties and prison time. However, we cannot overlook the failure to pay export duties on these funds and will require that you make such payment to avoid a full prosecution.

This is a limited time offer. If you prefer to pay the duty and avoid prosecution, Geekmail me and I will give you all my Paypal information so you can deposit the amount owed.

(wait, that went off course somewhere…)
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Mike Hoyt

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Sagrilarus wrote:

Some people with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder...


a euphemism for wargamer?
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Russ Williams
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joetaco wrote:
russ wrote:

I've sometimes read this, but I don't understand why some victims would be MORE likely to respond if the email is full of typos and language errors.

Yeah I thought the same thing until I googled it. Apparently it is a preliminary screening of sorts.

If you are willing to believe that the garbled mess of an email is legitimate then you are either incredibly gullible or not very intelligent (note: I don't mean this an insult to those who do not speak English well)

So by pre screening people who aren't easily duped, they get people to respond who are already a bit convinced and easily tricked.
But seems a different issue, i.e. filtering out savvy people, to save the scammers from wasting time dealing with "victims" who later realize they're being scammed and don't cooperate later in the scam.

A person who "passes the gullible test" (i.e. does not realize it's a scam) is still not more likely to respond because of the typing errors. Such a person would surely be just as likely to respond to an email that was convincing, it seems to me.

---

I.e. the errors increase the probability that a responder is gullible (given that a response occurs, it is more likely to be a very gullible person), but I don't see how they would increase the probability that a gullible person will respond (given that a person is gullible, I'm skeptical that the errors make them more likely to respond).
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Michael Dillenbeck
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russ wrote:
joetaco wrote:
russ wrote:

I've sometimes read this, but I don't understand why some victims would be MORE likely to respond if the email is full of typos and language errors.

Yeah I thought the same thing until I googled it. Apparently it is a preliminary screening of sorts.

If you are willing to believe that the garbled mess of an email is legitimate then you are either incredibly gullible or not very intelligent (note: I don't mean this an insult to those who do not speak English well)

So by pre screening people who aren't easily duped, they get people to respond who are already a bit convinced and easily tricked.
But seems a different issue, i.e. filtering out savvy people, to save the scammers from wasting time dealing with "victims" who later realize they're being scammed and don't cooperate later in the scam.

A person who "passes the gullible test" (i.e. does not realize it's a scam) is still not more likely to respond because of the typing errors. Such a person would surely be just as likely to respond to an email that was convincing, it seems to me.

---

I.e. the errors increase the probability that a responder is gullible (given that a response occurs, it is more likely to be a very gullible person), but I don't see how they would increase the probability that a gullible person will respond (given that a person is gullible, I'm skeptical that the errors make them more likely to respond).

It doesn't increase the odds of a response. These are like automatic gun fire - you spray the internet with them and figure that 0.00001% will hit. Intelligent or savvy users will recognize the scam immediately and delete/spam it out of their inbox, while the gullible person may respond. Once they get the initial hook, they can try to scam more by upping the stakes or they may sell the information to other scammers.

If you want another analogy, think of this as the water hose in a squirt gun fight tactic - you aren't increasing the chance that someone will come within range of your hose in an attempt to hit you, but you know those that do are people you will soak completely. (Then again, on a 100 degree day, maybe you being dry with a hose running shows you're the gullible one...)
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Francisco Gutierrez
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russ wrote:

A person who "passes the gullible test" (i.e. does not realize it's a scam) is still not more likely to respond because of the typing errors. Such a person would surely be just as likely to respond to an email that was convincing, it seems to me

Ah, excuse me for not reading carefully enough the first time. You are correct, typos do not LITERALLY increase the amount of responses.
These scams are often not a "one time" deal. My mother fell for a similar scam, someone called and convinced her that he was a distant family member by dropping some names.

She sent him a money order and was going to send another before I convinced her that she was being scammed. (Note: I don't mean to insult my mother )

I think that by including typos you are "ensuring" your victim is gullible. Therefore you end up with gullible people who are gullible enough to be stringed along for more money.
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Mike Hoyt

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joetaco wrote:


I think that by including typos you are "ensuring" your victim is gullible. Therefore you end up with gullible people who are gullible enough to be stringed strung along for more money.

Fixed, right? You're not fishing for gullible victims here are you? Are you?
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blockhead wrote:
Sagrilarus wrote:

Some people with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder...


a euphemism for wargamer?

I'm talking real OCD, not the way the term is thrown around here.

S.
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Jim F
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-E.. wrote:
Ashiefan wrote:
See if you can spot how this might not have been a real email from paypal.

Dear member,
You must confirme your Account informations.........


Unless of course I am giving paypal more credit than they deserve!

You've never actually talked to Paypal, have you? Let's just say, that email would not be out of line with their telephone representation.

Actually I have and it was a very annoying and frustrating experience!
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I know it isn't the same but it still makes me smile when I think of it. My mother once received a cold call from someone selling patio doors. I wish I had answered the call because I would of loved to of heard his explanation of how safe it would be to fit patio doors to a second floor flat/apartment.
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Re: A warning to wargamers about fake "O"-faced paypal emails.
Sagrilarus wrote:
blockhead wrote:
Sagrilarus wrote:

Some people with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder...


a euphemism for wargamer?

I'm talking real OCD, not the way the term is thrown around here.

S.
surprise They don't EVEN "have": PRS here yet! shake
 
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