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I made a categorization of some games, but I'd like your opinion on some of them... Who'd like to help the community objectively, so without your personal favourites?
 
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Daniel B-G
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If I'm going to be honest, the categories are very broad and not always well defined e.g. Agricola could be classed as both a building stuff game and a worker placement game.

Your categories are spanning thematic and mechanic definitions. I think I can see where you were going with some of them so I've made some suggested amendments and additions below.

Deck/pool building (opens up more options)
Worker Placement
Auction
Area Control
Tile-Laying (more specific term than building)
Cooperative
Network building (more generic term than train, which opens up Power Grid and Hansa Teutonica).
Card drafting

Specific points.
M:TG is not a deckbuilding game. It may involve playing with decks you've built, but a deckbuilding game is one in where the game is building the deck.
At the gates of Loyang is not a worker placement game. If you play this game, that will become obvious.
Tzolk'in is up there with Le Havre and Agrciola
I haven't played El Grande personally, but it is definitely not an easy game.

Additions
Deck/pool building: Light Valley of the Kings; Medium - Trains/Concordia/Roll for the Galaxy; Heavy - A Few Acres of Snow/Mage Knight Board Game/Lewis & Clark
Worker Placement: Light - Lords of Waterdeep; Medium - Keyflower/The Voyages of Marco Polo; Heavy - Caylus/Dominant Species
Auction: Light - For Sale/Biblios; Medium - Ra/Modern Art; Heavy - Indonesia/Goa
Area Control: Light - Eight-Minute Empire; Medium - Kemet/Alien Frontiers; Heavy - Imperial/Shogun
Tile-Laying: Light - Cacao/Patchwork; Medium - Suburbia/The Castles of Burgundy; Heavy - Tigris & Euphrates/Antiquity
Cooperative: Light Hanabi; Medium - Pandemic; Heavy - Robinson Crusoe: Adventures on the Cursed Island
Network building: Light Indigo/Paris Connection; Medium - Power Grid/Hansa Teutonica; Heavy - Brass: Lancashire/Roads & Boats
Card drafting: Light Sushi Go!; Medium - 7 Wonders; Heavy - Through the Ages: A Story of Civilization
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DAAAN wrote:
If I'm going to be honest, the categories are very broad and not always well defined e.g. Agricola could be classed as both a building stuff game and a worker placement game.

Your categories are spanning thematic and mechanic definitions. I think I can see where you were going with some of them so I've made some suggested amendments and additions below.

Deck/pool building (opens up more options)
Worker Placement
Auction
Area Control
Tile-Laying (more specific term than building)
Cooperative
Network building (more generic term than train, which opens up Power Grid and Hansa Teutonica).
Card drafting

Specific points.
M:TG is not a deckbuilding game. It may involve playing with decks you've built, but a deckbuilding game is one in where the game is building the deck.
At the gates of Loyang is not a worker placement game. If you play this game, that will become obvious.
Tzolk'in is up there with Le Havre and Agrciola
I haven't played El Grande personally, but it is definitely not an easy game.

Additions
Deck/pool building: Light Valley of the Kings; Medium - Trains/Concordia/Roll for the Galaxy; Heavy - A Few Acres of Snow/Mage Knight Board Game/Lewis & Clark
Worker Placement: Light - Lords of Waterdeep; Medium - Keyflower/The Voyages of Marco Polo; Heavy - Caylus/Dominant Species
Auction: Light - For Sale/Biblios; Medium - Ra/Modern Art; Heavy - Indonesia/Goa
Area Control: Light - Eight-Minute Empire; Medium - Kemet/Alien Frontiers; Heavy - Imperial/Shogun
Tile-Laying: Light - Cacao/Patchwork; Medium - Suburbia/The Castles of Burgundy; Heavy - Tigris & Euphrates/Antiquity
Cooperative: Light Hanabi; Medium - Pandemic; Heavy - Robinson Crusoe: Adventures on the Cursed Island
Network building: Light Indigo/Paris Connection; Medium - Power Grid/Hansa Teutonica; Heavy - Brass: Lancashire/Roads & Boats
Card drafting: Light Sushi Go!; Medium - 7 Wonders; Heavy - Through the Ages: A Story of Civilization


Why do you think Lewis & Clark is deck/poolbuilding (poolmanagement)?
Why Roll for the Galaxy?
I am just curious
(I see both have the mechanic listed in their page. I am familiar with Lewis & Clarke and I am surprised it does. I am not familiar with Roll for the Galaxy but I am interested; I just saw a review so I may simply have failed to notice that aspect.)

I commented on the list why I find interesting some categorization. Link: Comment
 
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Daniel B-G
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If you rebadge it as "pool" building that encompasses several disparate mechanics

Deckbuilding
Dicepool building - Roll for the Galaxy & Quarriors
Bag Building - Hyperborea & Orleans
Handbuilding - Concordia & Lewis and Clark

Core of the pool building mechanic is that you are drafting a range of personal actions that you alone have access. Access to those items are at times randomised (e.g. in Orleans, Hyberborea, Dominion and Quarriors), but that isn't a necessary condition.
 
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Daniel B-G
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I should add that the principal method of action in each of these games is to select and activate a smaller subset of the pool, with that subset determined either through chance (as above) or deliberate choice (L&C, Roll and Concordia).

Roll for the galaxy spans pool building and role selection as a mechanic, and Lewis & Clark also includes worker placement elements, but pool building is undeniably a significant element in each game.
 
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EDIT: I think you may have responded at least in part in your post while I was writing

DAAAN wrote:
If you rebadge it as "pool" building that encompasses several disparate mechanics

Deckbuilding
Dicepool building - Roll for the Galaxy & Quarriors
Bag Building - Hyperborea & Orleans
Handbuilding - Concordia & Lewis and Clark

Core of the pool building mechanic is that you are drafting a range of personal actions that you alone have access. Access to those items are at times randomised (e.g. in Orleans, Hyberborea, Dominion and Quarriors), but that isn't a necessary condition.


So if I understand correctly Roll for the Galaxy is poolmanagement because you acquire dice (that go in your pool). Have you access to all of them in every turn? (Like Lewis & Clark, in which you have all your cards.)

I have this nagging feeling that if we accept Lewis & Clark is a game with poolbuilding then we have to label Race for the Galaxy a game with poolbuilding too; and I think also Machi Koro.

The point about Hand building is really interesting for its implications.
I would like to know if this is a common enough idea (I did not think about it this way for example).
Maybe could I make a poll? But where? In "General gaming"? Suggestions?

Thanks DAAAN!
 
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Daniel B-G
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Machi Koro is a borderline case. The principal method of action is rolling some dice. There is literally no choice.

Race for the galaxy is not a pool building game, it is a role selection game. The cards you are collecting aren't directly activated, they are incidental activations based upon the role card that you select for the round.
 
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DAAAN wrote:
If you rebadge it as "pool" building that encompasses several disparate mechanics

Deckbuilding
Dicepool building - Roll for the Galaxy & Quarriors
Bag Building - Hyperborea & Orleans
Handbuilding - Concordia & Lewis and Clark

Core of the pool building mechanic is that you are drafting a range of personal actions that you alone have access. Access to those items are at times randomised (e.g. in Orleans, Hyberborea, Dominion and Quarriors), but that isn't a necessary condition.


The way you write this it would include Machi Koro?

You build your tableau of available cards from the central draft area, and randomly (dice) get to activate them.

The difference with a deck you draw from is only that you see the cards all the time, and don't shuffle, but roll dice.
 
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Daniel B-G
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In the next post, I further clarified this statement.

DAAAN wrote:
I should add that the principal method of action in each of these games is to select and activate a smaller subset of the pool, with that subset determined either through chance (as above) or deliberate choice (L&C, Roll and Concordia).

Roll for the galaxy spans pool building and role selection as a mechanic, and Lewis & Clark also includes worker placement elements, but pool building is undeniably a significant element in each game.


Machi Koro does not afford you a conscious choice in how to take your turn. You either adopt a hedging strategy or a focussed strategy that waits for a big payout. Either way, your game is focussed on finding ways to mitigate the luck of the dice rolls, which is not a feature found in all of the others.
 
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DAAAN wrote:
Machi Koro does not afford you a conscious choice in how to take your turn. You either adopt a hedging strategy or a focussed strategy that waits for a big payout. Either way, your game is focussed on finding ways to mitigate the luck of the dice rolls, which is not a feature found in all of the others.


So how's that any different from Dominion? You draw a random hand, and have to manage whatever you can buy from the effects of those cards. Call that 'mitigate the luck of the draw', and we're in the exact same place.

The main difference for Machi Koro would be the fact that the effect of a single dice roll can trigger multiples of the same effect. But that compares pretty well to the +draw and +action combo's in Dominion.

Mitigating luck is the aim of both games, except dice make it more visible, and the method is different.
Thinning your deck in DOminion works to mitigate, while in MK there is no thinning.
You actually need build more to mitigate, since you want to cover all numbers that can be rolled.

Also, you can save up money in MK, to buy something better/bigger later. Dominion does not offer that.

So there's your differences. Is that the defining difference between deck building or not deck building though?

And isn't it great to just get back to this nice discussion after a year and a half? Maybe we've got new insights (or silly examples) now.

I personally still think the fact that it's technically a tableau does not disqualify MK from the deck-building (pool building) category. It has too much in common with deckbuilders to simply dismiss it.
 
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